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Posts Tagged "genomics"

But Seriously...

Linda Avey on Open Access and 23andMe

Linda Avey

With 23andMe in the news this week, I thought it was a good time to share something I’d never published before. It’s a short interview with Linda Avey, co-founder of 23andMe. I spoke with Linda a couple years ago at the 2011 Open Science Summit in Mountain View, CA. I asked her a few questions [...]

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Expeditions

You wanted to know: what is this virus that infects the phytoplankton? (Part One)

So far I’ve told you about the phytoplankton we’re studying — the coccolithophores, how we figure out where they’re going to be, and how we collect them. But there’s a key element that’s missing in this description: the virus that infects them. And a lot of you wanted to know about it. What kind of [...]

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Observations

Massive Genomics Center Set to Open in Lower Manhattan

artist

NEW YORK—For a spot news junkie, the sight of a podium-studded dais surrounded by people holding up recording devices is irresistible, especially on a hot summer day. So, I was delighted to happen this morning upon such a press conference on my way to the Scientific American office. The event was held to announce a [...]

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Observations

1 Big Migration Spawned Most–but Not All–Indigenous Americans

genomics show wave of first american migrations

At least 15,000 years ago intrepid Siberians crossed the newly exposed Bering land bridge to arrive in the unpeopled Americas. But was this influx the only ancient wave from East Asia? Researchers have been studying archeological, linguistic and genetic evidence for years in a quest to understand how the first Americans arrived and spread through [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Winning two Nobel Prizes, turning down knighthoods: The legacy of Fred Sanger (1918-2013)

Fred Sanger (1918-2013) (Image: The Telegraph)

British biochemist Fred Sanger died today at 95. He’s the only person to win two Nobel Prizes in chemistry, an achievement that is unlikely to be surpassed anytime soon. In his full but not overly long career – promptly ending with retirement at the mandatory retirement age in Britain – Sanger revolutionized both protein sequencing [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Cancer, genomics and technological solutionism: A time to be wary

In his new book “To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism”, the philosopher of technology Evgeny Morozov develops the concept of “technological solutionism”, the tendency to define problems primarily or purely based on whether or not a certain technology can address them. This is a concerning trend since it foreshadows a future [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

ENCODE, Apple Maps and function: Why definitions matter

Remember that news-making ENCODE study with its claims that “80% of the genome is functional”? Remember how those claims were the starting point for a public relations disaster which pronounced (for the umpteenth time) the “death of junk DNA”? Even mainstream journalists bought into this misleading claim. I wrote a post on ENCODE where I [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Physicists in Biology; And Other Quirks of the Genomic Age

Leo Szilard – brilliant, peripatetic Hungarian physicist, habitué of hotel lobbies, soothsayer without peer – first grasped the implications of a nuclear chain reaction in 1933 while stepping off the curb at a traffic light in London. Szilard has many distinctions to his name; not only did he file a patent for the first nuclear reactor [...]

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