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Posts Tagged "emergence"

But Seriously...

Interview with a Cicada (Expert)

Cicada-Alex Wild

In North Carolina, this was a big year for cicadas. Our 17-year cicadas, after biding their time underground for so very long, finally emerged in the spring. This event, in turn, stimulated the emergence of a species that is extraordinarily rare: the cicada specialist. Chris Simon is an excellent specimen of the latter. A cicada [...]

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Symbiartic

The Most Fascinating Image You Can See On LinkedIn

InMap_Glendon_Mellow_mini

Nothing can say”Amazing art!” the way an intricate web with your own name in the center can. I am glorious. LinkedIn launched a feature called InMaps back in 2011 and they produce visually arresting, zoomable depictions of your network. Over the last 6 or 7 years, I’ve developed my LinkedIn network in a mostly casual [...]

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Symbiartic

Balloons, Books and Beer: The Emergent Art of Willy Chyr

WChyr-220

Back in February, we showcased some of science-artist Willy Chyr‘s stunning Neuroplastic Dreams. When I met Chyr here in Toronto those few months back, I wasn’t expecting the forthright clarity and modesty in his character that I encountered. Chyr is intelligent and fun. I’m pleased to share this interview with this vibrant talent. – - [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Stephen Hawking’s advice for twenty-first century grads: Embrace complexity

As the economy continues to chart its own tortuous, uncertain course, there seems to have been a fair amount of much-needed discussion on the kinds of skills new grads should possess. These skills of course have to be driven by market demand. As chemist George Whitesides asks for instance, what’s the point of getting a [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Is the age of scientific genius over?

There’s a short rumination in this week’s Nature in which Dean Keith Simonton, a psychologist from the University of California, Davis asks a question that often surfaces: Is the age of scientific genius over? Will we see another Einstein, Darwin or Newton or is the idea of the lone genius assiduously scribbling at his desk [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Chemistry and Biology: Kuhnian or Galisonian?

Freeman Dyson has a perspective in this week’s Science magazine in which he provides a summary of a theme he has explored in his book “The Sun, the Genome and the Internet”. Dyson’s central thesis is that scientific revolutions are driven as much or even more by tools than by ideas. This view runs somewhat [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Physicists in Biology; And Other Quirks of the Genomic Age

Leo Szilard – brilliant, peripatetic Hungarian physicist, habitué of hotel lobbies, soothsayer without peer – first grasped the implications of a nuclear chain reaction in 1933 while stepping off the curb at a traffic light in London. Szilard has many distinctions to his name; not only did he file a patent for the first nuclear reactor [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

The Higgs boson and the future of science

The discovery of the Higgs boson (or the “Higgs-like particle” if you prefer) is without a doubt one of the signal scientific achievements of our time. It illustrates what sheer thought – aided by data of course – can reveal about the workings of the universe and it continues a trend that lists Descartes, Hume, [...]

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