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Posts Tagged "squamates"

Tetrapod Zoology

Skinks skinks skinks (part I)

A Tiliqua montage. At top: Blotched blue-tongue (T. nigrolutea) (photo by Benjamin444, CC BY-SA 3.0). Below: A Shingleback (T. rugosa) (photo by Jarrod, CC-BY-2.0).

Skinks (properly Scincidae… though read on) are one of the most successful of squamate groups, accounting for approximately 1500 species – in other words, for about 25% of all lizards. Skinks occur on all continents (except Antarctica) as well as on numerous island groups. Extant species range from less than 10 cm in total length [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Racerunner lizards of the world unite

Racerunners as geopolitical icons. Steppe-runners (E. arguta) on stamps produced by Kyrgyzstan and Moldova. Images in public domain.

Today we’re here because of the lacertid lizards, the Old World clade that includes Eurasian wall lizards, green lizards, fringe-toed lizards and a great number of less familiar species groups that rarely get much attention outside of the specialist literature. Yes, as you might have realised if you’re a long-term and/or regular reader, this is [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Neat news from the TetZoo-sphere

"Tapirs sometimes walk on the bottom of lakes and rivers". Oh really? Yes, really.

Here are some amazing things that me and my friends have been talking about lately. They all concern fascinating discoveries or insights into unusual aspects of tetrapod behaviour. We’ll start with my current obsession: the short bit of underwater footage (16 seconds long) that shows an adult Lowland tapir Tapirus terrestris ‘walking’ (at great speed) [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on… it’s about monitor lizards

Current version of the monitor montage. Image by Darren Naish.

There’s been a bit of a monitor lizard thing going on here for the past few months: articles have covered Australian goannas, the Komodo dragon Varanus komodoensis, Dumeril’s monitor and Timor and Peachthroat monitors, and the ‘prasinoid’ tree monitors. In ‘spare’ time, I’ve been working on the montage you see here, designed to depict a [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Portraits of amphisbaenians

Portrait of Amphisbaena alba, by Darren Naish.

There have never been enough amphisbaenians on Tet Zoo. In fact, the only time I’ve written about them at any sort of length is in the 2008 (and 2012) April Fool’s article wherein they were convincingly (cough) shown to be the true ancestors of mammals. In reality, amphisbaenians – popularly called worm lizards – are [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Hell yes: Komodo dragons!!! (again)

Komodo dragon feeding scrum. Not sure what's in the middle, but I somehow doubt that it's alive.

What with all the monitor-themed goodness around these parts lately (see links below), it seems only fitting that I provide a re-vamped, substantially updated version of this Tet Zoo ver 2 classic (originally published in September 2007). Here we go… Without doubt, one of the coolest living animals on the planet is the Komodo dragon Varanus [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

“Lean, green and rarely seen”: enthralling prasinoid tree monitors

A tree monitor montage, images by Darren Naish.

I said in the previous Tet Zoo article on monitor lizards that I really wanted to cover the prasinoids; that is, the arboreal tree monitors of New Guinea, Cape York Peninsula and various of the islands surrounding these areas. So, let’s get to it. Tree monitors or prasinoids, also termed the Varanus prasinus species group, [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Obscure and attractive monitor lizards to know and love

Varanid portraits.

Everybody loves monitor lizards, or varanids. And there is so much to learn about, and to appreciate, in these remarkable, charismatic, complex, sophisticated lizards that scientists across many disciplines are being encouraged to study them and – lo – to make remarkable discoveries. In recent months we’ve seen the discovery of a mammal-like rate of [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Australia, land of dragons (part II)

Dwarf bearded dragon (Pogona minor), a semi-arboreal Pogona that lacks many of the spines present in other Pogona species. Image (c) Stephen Zozaya, used with permission.

Time for more Australian agamids, or amphibolurines, or dragons, whichever you prefer. Last time round, we looked at the water dragons, Moloch and a few other taxa, meaning that ‘all’ that’s left to get through is… the remainder. And there are quite a few of them: bearded dragons, earless dragons, bicycle dragons (yes, really) and [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Australia, land of dragons (by which I mean: agamids) (part I)

Frilled dragon of the especially dark sort seen in Cape York Peninsula: I love the fact that you can see the large caniniform teeth in this shot. Image (c) Stephen Zozaya, used with permission.

Agamids are a widespread, diverse iguanian lizard group that I have a special fondness for and consequently have featured several times on Tet Zoo (see links below). Of course, I’ve never featured them enough, nor discussed or even mentioned whole groups of species that really should get adequate coverage here. In a recent article I [...]

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