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Posts Tagged "salamanders"

Extinction Countdown

Fire Salamanders in the Netherlands Wiped Out by Newly Discovered Fungus

fire salamander

Five years ago the Netherlands was home to a small but healthy population of fire salamanders (Salamandra salamandra terrestris). That is no longer the case. The first dead salamanders, their bodies lacking any visible signs of injuries, turned up in 2008. More mysteriously dead salamanders appeared in the following years, while field surveys found fewer [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Hellbender Head Start: Raising Giant Salamanders in the Bronx

Eastern Hellbender sq

Four years ago 41 hellbender salamander larvae from western New York State arrived at their temporary home in New York City. Originally collected as eggs near the Allegheny River, the hellbenders—also known as snot otters or devil dogs—were hatched at the Buffalo Zoo and then transferred to the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo, where they [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Amphibians in U.S. Declining at “Alarming and Rapid Rate”

yellow-legged frog

A new study finds that frogs, toads, salamanders and other amphibians in the U.S. are dying off so quickly that they could disappear from half of their habitats in the next 20 years. For some of the more endangered species, they could lose half of their habitats in as little as six years. The nine-year [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Endangered Ozark Hellbender Salamanders Breed in Captivity for the First Time

“In my 24 years in the zoo business, this is one of the most exciting periods I’ve been through so far,” says Jeff Ettling, curator of herpetology and aquatics at the Saint Louis Zoo. He’s talking about the birth of 185 baby Ozark hellbender salamanders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi) at the zoo’s Ron Goellner Center for [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Salamanders slipping away, global warming may be to blame

Biologists report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week that they were unable to find  a pair of previously common Guatemalan salamander species — Pseudoeurycea brunnata and Pseudoeurycea goebeli — and  say they are apparently extinct. Numerous other species in Guatemala and Mexico also failed to turn up during several surveys [...]

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Guest Blog

Regeneration: The axolotl story

Last week, the science community was set a-buzz with a new study that showcased the unique relationship between salamanders and algae. The research, done by Ryan Kerney at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, found that spotted salamander tissues contained algae embedded within them. The exact purpose of this relationship (which begins when the salamanders are [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Model salamanders, in a cave

Life-sized Fire salamander model, encountered in one of the Dan yr Ogof caves, Brecon Beacons National Park, Wales.

While on a family holiday recently I visited Dan yr Ogof, the famous National Show Cave for Wales. Besides being interesting for the expected geological and speleological reasons, Dan yr Ogof is set within landscaped gardens that, bizarrely, feature one of Europe’s largest ‘dinosaur parks’. Great plastic models of tyrannosaurs, sauropods and all manner of [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

THE AMAZING WORLD OF SALAMANDERS

How could I not mention the Black Mudpuppy, the world's best parthenogenetic salamander superhero? The Black Mudpuppy is a comic, featuring nazi dinosaurs, Aztec gods and a whole world of awesome. Image kindly provided by Ethan Kocak.

Tet Zoo loves amphibians* (that’s anurans, salamanders, caecilians and their close relatives), and since 2008 I’ve been making a concerted effort to get through all the amphibian groups of the world. I’ve failed, and I’m blaming that entirely on the fact that I can’t put the time I need to into blogging. Sigh, always busy [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

33% of the newts of my country

NOT a Palmate newt: a male Smooth newt. Note obviously spotted underside and lack of terminal tail filament. Photo by Darren Naish. CC BY.

I know the newts of my country… but that’s not hard, there are only three (or four if you count the alien one). The Palmate newt Lissotriton helveticus is Britain’s smallest species (reaching 95 mm in total length), though it’s not the smallest of all European newts, being exceeded by the 80 mm Italian newt L. [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Life and times of the wild Axolotl

There haven’t been enough lissamphibians on Tet Zoo lately. So here’s a recycled section of text on axolotls, originally from a 2008 ver 2 article. I haven’t updated it properly, but I have added a new section of text at the end. Thanks to its perennial use in the pet and laboratory industries, the Axolotl [...]

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