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"primates"35 articles archived since 1845

Some of The Things I Have Gotten Wrong

As a regular reader, you might know that Tet Zoo has been going for over nine years now. I've written about a lot of stuff, I’ve been intrigued and enthused by a substantial number of animals and animal-themed topics, and I’ve been attracted to a variety of controversial ideas and claimed discoveries.

April 20, 2015

Call of the Orangutan: A Camera Trap Menagerie

In order to get more information about the forest here at the Sikundur research station in North Sumatra, I've set up four camera traps, which I'm using to get a better look at the wildlife around the site.

November 25, 2014 — James Askew
Call of the Orangutan: How to Follow an Orangutan

Call of the Orangutan: How to Follow an Orangutan

In my previous post, I wrote about the first task in studying orangutan behavior: finding the animals. In this one I'll explain the second major task: following them.

August 20, 2014 — James Askew
Photoblogging: Gorilla Through Glass

Photoblogging: Gorilla Through Glass

One of the main challenges with photographing the non-human animals at the zoo is shooting through glass. Sometimes you just can’t get an angle without any glare, but sometimes it doesn’t matter.

December 15, 2013 — Jason G. Goldman
Call of the Orangutan: Using Drones to Scan the Forest

Call of the Orangutan: Using Drones to Scan the Forest

One of the most interesting areas the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (SOCP) is currently working on is mapping, monitoring and surveying orangutan habitats around the island using drones.

January 23, 2015 — James Askew
De Loys’ Ape and what to do with it

De Loys’ Ape and what to do with it

Purely because the time feels about right, I thought I’d post an excerpt from the cryptozoology-themed book that John Conway, Memo Kosemen and myself published last year – Cryptozoologicon Volume I (Conway et al.

July 17, 2014 — Darren Naish

How Zoos Acquire Endangered Species

How do you transport two young orangutans to a zoo thousands of kilometers away from their native lands? Here's the simple answer: FedEx. Here's the less simple answer: It's a lot of work.

March 30, 2015 — John R. Platt

Piltdown Man and the Dualist Contention

One of the most fascinating episodes in the history of palaeontology is that of Piltdown man, an alleged human ancestor discovered in 1908 at Piltdown in Sussex, England. Formally named Eoanthropus dawsoni in 1912, Piltdown man matched early 20th century expectations of what a human ancestor might be like. It combined a large brain with an ape-like jaw (therefore confirming ideas that the evolution of big brains led the way in hominin evolution), and it lived in Europe (confirming ideas that hominin evolution was a Eurasian event, the hominins of Africa and tropical Asia being divergent irrelevancies or side-branches). The African australopithecines had yet to be discovered, nor had scarcely any of the wealth of fossil African hominins we know of today.

October 3, 2015
Rare Monkey Population up 50 Percent in China and Tibet

Rare Monkey Population up 50 Percent in China and Tibet

Two decades ago just 50 black snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti) lived in the Tibetan Autonomous Region of China. This January a survey revealed that number had risen to an amazing 700 animals.

August 15, 2013 — John R. Platt
Good News for One of the World’s Rarest Monkeys

Good News for One of the World’s Rarest Monkeys

You know that a species is in rough shape when a population increase of just 20 animals is cause for celebration. But that’s the case in northern Vietnam this month, where one of the few remaining groups of critically endangered Tonkin snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus avunculus) has grown from just 90 individuals in 2006 to between [...]

December 17, 2013 — John R. Platt
Scientists Get Primates to Play Cards

Scientists Get Primates to Play Cards

A few months ago I moved to Reno, Nevada. Although I haven't been to a casino yet myself, living in a so-called `casino town' makes you acutely aware of the effects of gambling on people.

February 28, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Sunday Species Snapshot: Coquerel’s Sifaka

Sunday Species Snapshot: Coquerel’s Sifaka

These medium-sized lemurs, known for their delightful leaping ability, were only recognized as their own species in 2001, which undoubtedly slowed conservation efforts.

February 9, 2014 — John R. Platt

Tales from the Cryptozoologicon: the Yeti

Hot on the heels of our highly successful and much-praised All Yesterdays: Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Animals [BUY IT HERE], John Conway, C.

August 4, 2013 — Darren Naish

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