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Posts Tagged "paleoart"

Image of the Week

The 500-lb. Chicken From Hell

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Source: 500-Pound “Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Once Roamed North America by Kate Wong at Observations Illustration credit: Mark Klingler, Carnegie Museum of Natural History Nothing you could find in any hen house could prepare you for the 11.5-foot tall, 500-lb. behemoth that roamed the landscape 66-million years ago in what is today North and South [...]

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Image of the Week

Dynamic Grace from Static Fossils

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Tiktaalik reconstruction © Kalliopi Monoyios   From: Scientists Discover the Very First Hipster Source: Kalliopi Monoyios While photography is often the preferred way to document scientific phenomena, there’s an area where scientific illustration rules: the fossil record. Scientific American Blogs’ own Kalliopi Monoyios has been documenting Tiktaalik with Neil Shubin’s lab since the beginning, seeing [...]

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Symbiartic

Jurassic World Butting Heads with PaleoIllustrators

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Once again, paleo-illustrators are being alienated from a movie they could probably love. At least a few paleo-illustrators are discovering their work has been put up on the Jurassic World “as-if-it-was-a-real-park” promotional website without their permission. Here’s a short history of pushing away what should be the movie’s most ardent supporters. First, the director Colin [...]

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Symbiartic

Those Wild Little Trilobites

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Triloarte 1 © Samantha Fermo     Triloarte 6 © Samantha Fermo Triloarte 8 © Samantha Fermo Trilobites, in all their wild and crazy biodiverse forms, look delightful in this series by Italian painter Samantha Fermo. Created as part of paleontologist Dr. Gianpaolo Di Silvestro’s informative and visually-rich Trilobiti.com, this collaboration is the start of [...]

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Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

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For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

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Symbiartic

Synapsid Sunrise

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With hues inspired by calcite and a plastic toy dimetrodon sitting as a model, Sharon Wegner-Larsen created this stunning watercolour and ink work, Synapsid Sunrise. The paint is warm and reminiscent of how light through stained glass on a sunny day seeps into your pores. The scene captures the heat and cheer of an early [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond

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The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as [...]

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Symbiartic

The Marvelous Flying Sauropods of Puttapipat

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There are two kinds of illustrators. Those, like myself who bend fine art and other forms into the service of illustration – and then there are illustrators like Niroot Puttapipat (a.k.a. Himmapaan) who follow in the rich tradition of book illustrators like Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac. In the handling of his art materials and [...]

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Symbiartic

Glendon’s Top 5 Paleoart Books You Must Own

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Protoceratops © by John Conway, from All Yesterdays As someone fascinated by prehistoric life during my entire existence, my love for paleoart is experiencing something of a renaissance: I have children now. There’s nothing more enchanting than reading a dinosaur book with a 3 year old and talking about the beasties. “Maybe this one ate [...]

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Symbiartic

Dinosaurs in Broad Daylight: The Paleoart of Julius Csotonyi

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Back in 2012 I described paleoartist Julius Csotonyi as a Paleoart Rockstar. The title certainly fits: few illustrators today can make a living image-making full-time, especially in the sciences. If The Paleoart of Julius Csotonyi: Dinosaurs, Sabre-Tooths and Beyond (Titan Books) is any indication, Csotonyi is not only surviving, he is thriving. This book is [...]

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Symbiartic

The Hypnotic Whorl of Teeth That Keeps Researchers Guessing

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How many facelifts can one extinct animal undergo? The answer is probably equal to the number of interested researchers and paleoartists out there, and then some. In the case of the mysterious whorled tooth rows left behind by the fossil fish known as Helicoprion, artist Ray Troll has documented close to two dozen, many of [...]

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Symbiartic

Look into the Eyes: paleoart by Stevie Moore

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I think it’s the eyes. There is a lot of paleoart out there, and we feature a lot of it here on Symbiartic. Something about dinosaurs attracts some of the very best nature and science illustrators out there. I suspect some kind of love of science plus childhood nostalgia drives all of the dinophilia images [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

The changing life appearance of dinosaurs

Jurassic dinosaurs as illustrated by Peter Zallinger: these are svelte, lightweight animals typical of the late 1970s and 80s. Hat-tip to LITC for the scan.

Anyone who knows anything about Mesozoic dinosaurs will be – or certainly should be – familiar with the fact that our view of what these animals looked like in life has changed substantially within the last several decades. The ‘dinosaur renaissance’ of the late 1960s and 70s saw the flabby-bodied, tail-dragging behemoths of earlier decades [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Where did all these Phorusrhacos come from?

Phorusrhacos models at various outdoor attractions. All images by Darren Naish except one at bottom left, by Colleen Blue.

If, as I have, you’ve spent copious time wandering the British countryside, visiting amusement parks and visitor attractions that feature life-sized ‘prehistoric animals’, you’ll surely have seen all those Phorusrhacos* models. Look, here’s a little montage I made… * You might have seen the name Phorusrhacos written as Phororhacos (and Phorusrhacidae written as Phororhacidae). The former [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

TetZooCon 2014: last call!

One of Rebecca Groom's newest Palaeoplushies -- can you guess what it is? Buy one at TetZooCon!

Are you interested in the evolution and diversity of tetrapods? In dinosaurs? Pterosaurs? Herpetology, mammalogy, wildlife photography, palaeoart? In speculative zoology, cryptozoology or arcane historical zoology? The answer is surely yes, and, seeing as it is, you very probably need to BOOK NOW for TetZooCon 2014, the world’s first-ever Tetrapod Zoology Convention. It’s being held [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

A tongue-wrestling interlude, from the azhdarchids

Tongue-wrestling Quetzalcoatlus pair, by Bob Nicholls, used with permission.

I’d like to talk to you about the recently announced ‘Yeti DNA’ discovery just featured on British television; I’d like to talk to you about tail feathers in Cretaceous maniraptoran dinosaurs (O’Connor et al. 2013), about the weird new Miocene pseudo-otter Teruelictis (Salesa et al. 2013), about the spectacular new leaf-tailed gecko Saltuarius eximius (Hoskin [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

All Your Yesterdays, our new book

All Your Yesterdays is here. The cover art (featuring juvenile troodontids) is by Alvaro Rozalen.

Last year, John Conway, Memo Kosemen and myself published All Yesterdays (it also features skeletal reconstructions by the brilliant Scott Hartman), a book that focused specifically on the more speculative aspects of palaeoart: follow the links below for more on this project. If you liked All Yesterdays, you’ll be pleased to hear that there’s a sequel, [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Teenage Mutant Ninja Temnospondyls

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You all enjoyed the many Platyhystrix images featured here the other day (interesting discussion still going on in the comments section on that article, check it out). Henrik Petersson, in particular, did us all proud with a TMNT-themed temnospondyl, perhaps the world’s first ever (and I used to play TMNT the RPG, so I’ve seen [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

The troubling lack of Platyhystrix images online: the Tet Zoo Solution

TMNT Platyhytrix, but with the second 'T' standing for temnospondyl! Image by Henrik Petersson, used with permission. I hope that we'lll end up a full squad of TMNT temnos... that's Raphael done, Donatello next?

Regular readers will know that I’ve been doing my best over the last several years to get through the temnospondyls of the world. Temnospondyli, for the one or two or you that don’t know, is an enormous and substantially diverse clade of anamniotes (‘amphibians’) that was an important and persistent presence between the Early Carboniferous [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Quetzalcoatlus: the evil, pin-headed, toothy nightmare monster that wants to eat your soul

Giovanni Caselli's 1975 Demon Quetz, the image that started the meme.

Regular readers of Tet Zoo will be familiar with two topics I’ve covered on and off over the years: azhdarchid pterosaurs, and palaeoart memes. Azhdarchids were mostly large to gigantic, long-skulled Cretaceous pterosaurs, noted for their enormous wingspans (up to 10 m or so in the case of Quetzalcoatlus from the USA and Hatzegopteryx from [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Tet Zoo Bookshelf: van Grouw’s Unfeathered Bird, Bodio’s Eternity of Eagles, Witton’s Pterosaurs, Van Duzer’s Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps!

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I feel guilty about the fact that I haven’t been able to keep up with book reviews lately. It typically takes me – literally – months to years to read a book and then write a substantive review, and pressures of work, domestic life, research and other commitments make it very hard to find the [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

All Yesterdays: the talks!

The three talks given at the All Yesterdays launch earlier this month are now viewable online. I’ve been having trouble getting them viewable here at Tet Zoo: here’s mine (with a link to the youtube appearance below)… All Yesterdays Book Launch Talk – Darren Naish For John’s go here; for Memo’s go here. I will [...]

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