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Posts Tagged "monkeys"

Anthropology in Practice

Closing the Monkey House: The End of a Shared Experience

Change is afoot and people aren’t sure what to make of it. Last Monday, the Bronx Zoo officially closed its 111-year-old Primate (“Monkey”) House, citing a need for change in the ways the animals are exhibited—an evolution, if you will. Responses have revealed how deeply unsettling the closure is to the general psyche of the [...]

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Compound Eye

Primates of Kibale Forest

baboon1f

Uganda’s Kibale forest is such a hotspot for primate research that when our group of 40 biologists arrived this August to study ants (=definitely not primates!) we received some strange looks. Why look at insects when the trees are full of a dozen monkey species? That insects are, in fact, waaaaayyy more interesting than monkeys [...]

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Extinction Countdown

First-Ever Video of Critically Endangered Myanmar Snub-Nosed Monkeys

myanmar snub-nosed monkey

Here’s something you don’t see every day: video footage of the critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus strykeri), a species that was only discovered in 2010. You can count at least 23 of the rare monkeys, out of a total population estimated to range from 260 to 330 individuals for the entire species, in the [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Lion Tamarins versus Climate Change

golden lion tamarin

Ecologically speaking, humans maintain a pretty broad niche. We can adapt to live just about anywhere. Most other species aren’t that lucky. Take the four species of lion tamarins, for example. These small, endangered monkeys of the genus Leontopithecus rely on very narrow niches of habitat in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, areas that already face [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Good News for One of the World’s Rarest Monkeys

tonkin snub-nosed monkeys

You know that a species is in rough shape when a population increase of just 20 animals is cause for celebration. But that’s the case in northern Vietnam this month, where one of the few remaining groups of critically endangered Tonkin snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus avunculus) has grown from just 90 individuals in 2006 to between [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Rare Monkey Population up 50 Percent in China and Tibet

black snub-nosed money Franziska Bauer

Two decades ago just 50 black snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti) lived in the Tibetan Autonomous Region of China. This January a survey revealed that number had risen to an amazing 700 animals. Now further surveys of the monkeys’ other populations in China bring us even more good news: The total population for this endangered species [...]

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Extinction Countdown

A Monkey with Human Eyes and Other Links from the Brink

lesula

A winning snail, an unusual monkey and abused manatees are among the endangered species in the news this week. Best News of the Week: The Magazine Mountain shagreen snail (Inflectarius magazinensis) has become the first invertebrate protected by the Endangered Species Act to fully recover. The snail has now been removed from the endangered species [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Critically Endangered Purring Monkey and 1,900 Other Species Added to IUCN Red List

It took more than 30 years for science to formally identify the Caquetá titi monkey (Callicebus caquetensis) of Colombia as a new species. Now it probably won’t last another 30 years unless it is protected, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which on Tuesday added the monkey and more than 1,900 [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Poachers Wiping Out Rare Monkey in Tanzania

An endangered Old World monkey species found in only two sites in Tanzania is in danger of being poached and eaten into extinction, researchers from the Tanzania Forest Conservation Group (TFCG) and Udzungwa Ecological Monitoring Center reported last week. The Sanje mangabey (Cercocebus sanjei) lives only in the Mwanihana Forest and the Udzungwa Scarp Forest [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Ugandan Chimpanzees May Be Hunting Red Colobus Monkeys into Extinction

red colobus monkey

Red colobus monkeys in Uganda’s Kibale National Park are being hunted to extinction—by chimpanzees. According to a study published May 9 in the American Journal of Primatology, this is the first documented case of a nonhuman primate significantly overhunting another primate species. (The taxonomy of Ugandan red colobus monkeys is in dispute. Some scientists consider [...]

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Guest Blog

Frans de Waal on the human primate: Fair is fair

Editor’s Note: This post is the first in a four-part series of essays for Scientific American by primatologist Frans de Waal on human nature, based on his ongoing research. De Waal and other researchers appear in a series of Department of Expansion videos focusing on the same topic. How often do we see rich people [...]

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Illusion Chasers

Fat Tuesday: Caloric Restriction’s Days Are Numbered

Whereas monkeys that are put on a restricted diet long-term may be healthier than monkeys that are fed 50% more, they don’t live longer. But you have to admit, the monkeys do look spritely.

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Observations

Parasitic Worm Eggs Ease Intestinal Ills by Changing Gut Macrobiota

parasitic worm egg monkey colitis ibs

Intestinal issues are not just for us humans. Whereas the inflammatory bowel disease (IBS) now afflicts some 1.4 million people in the U.S., a similar condition often besets captive monkeys. But these animals are providing new insights about a cure for this condition in both species—and that cure is worms. Rhesus macaque monkeys living in [...]

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Observations

Can You Predict a Monkey’s Social Status by Looking at Its Genes?

rhesus macaques in India

Rhesus macaques, which are some of the best studied of all monkeys, establish hierarchies in their social groups. Whenever two macaques tussle over a piece of food, say, or the right to mate, the monkey with the higher rank usually wins. Primatologists have established that monkeys of a lower social status are generally more stressed [...]

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Observations

New ape fossil challenges DNA evidence about ancient split from other primates

primate skull found that might illuminate human and great ape evolution

With high-speed DNA sequencing, scientists can look at slight genetic differences among humans, great apes and other primates to arrive at new estimates of when different ancestral groups split. These findings provide invaluable insights into the evolutionary past, especially when the fossil record is sparse, as it is for the period when the ancestors of [...]

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Observations

Monkey see, monkey calculate: How are primates’ brains wired for math?

monkey primate math rule brain neuron

Like a lot of humans, monkeys might not be able to do calculus. But a new study shows that they can learn and rapidly apply abstract mathematical principles. Previous work has shown that monkeys and birds can count, but flexible applications of higher mathematic rules, the study authors asserted, "require the highest degree of internal [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

De Loys’ Ape and what to do with it

Ameranthropoides imagined as a 'real' platyrrhine primate: image by C. M. Kosemen, from the 2013 book Cryptozoologicon Volume I (Conway et al. 2013).

Purely because the time feels about right, I thought I’d post an excerpt from the cryptozoology-themed book that John Conway, Memo Kosemen and myself published last year – Cryptozoologicon Volume I (Conway et al. 2013). The book is still available for purchase here; previously featured excerpts are linked to at the bottom of this article, [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Old World monkeys of choice

Male Gelada, Howletts Animal Park. Don't call them 'gelada baboons', since they're not baboons. Photo by Darren Naish.

There have never been enough primates on Tet Zoo. That isn’t because I’m not interested in primates, nor because I don’t think about primates, or look at primates, that much… in fact, I probably think about, and look at, primates more than I do any other group of animals… it’s simply because – as is [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Nasalis among the odd-nosed colobines or The “Nasalis Paradox” (proboscis monkeys part II)

Yay, more primates. Right? Before moving on to other things (the list of subjects that need to be covered at Tet Zoo ASAP is now worryingly and impractically long), I must finish with the Proboscis monkey Nasalis larvatus [adjacent photo by Bjørn Christian Tørrissen]. In the previous article I discussed various aspects of this fascinating monkey’s [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

The amazing swimming Proboscis monkey (part I)

I am perpetually interested in monkeys. One of the most remarkable and interesting of them all has to be the uniquely Bornean Proboscis monkey Nasalis larvatus, also sometimes called the Long-nosed monkey or Bekantan. Proboscis monkeys are famously named for the enormous, pendant, tongue-shaped noses of adult males; those of juveniles and females are shorter [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Marmosets and tamarins: dwarfed monkeys of the South American tropics

Marmosets and tamarins (callitrichids) are small platyrrhine monkeys: total lengths range from 40 cm for the Pygmy marmoset Cebuella pygmaea to 75 cm for the Golden lion tamarin Leontopithecus rosalia. The Pygmy marmoset can weigh as little as 120 g. Callitrichids are unique to tropical South [UPDATE: and Central!] America. About 60 species are recognised, [...]

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