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Posts Tagged "Mesozoic dinosaurs"

Tetrapod Zoology

Bird behaviour, the ‘deep time’ perspective

Composite cladogram of Avialae - topology and names based mostly on Yuri et al. (2013), and with many lineages excluded for reasons of space – showing where the fossil record gives us key insights into behaviour. From Naish (2014): this diagram is a much-updated version of the tree published in Naish (2012).

The behaviour of long-extinct animals remains an area of major public and scientific interest – the great perennial problem being that we’re always massively constrained, if not crippled, by a frustrating lack of data. Think of all the things we want to know, versus the things that we actually do know. In a paper recently [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Flight of the Microraptor

Our Microraptor in picturesque settings. The hindlimbs are shown here in near-maximum sprawl. Photo from Dyke et al. (2013).

Some weeks ago now, myself and a team of colleagues (Gareth Dyke, Roeland de Kat, Colin Palmer, Jacques Van der Kindere and Bharathram Ganapathisubramani) – all of whom are based at the University of Southampton – published the results (in Nature Communications) of our study on the aerodynamic performance of Microraptor, a small, long-winged dromaeosaurid [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Coelophysoid theropods 101

Thorax of one of the famous AMNH Coelophysis specimens that has a crocodylomorph (NOT a juvenile Coelophysis) preserved within. Neck at top of image, left forelimb projecting to left. Image by smokeybjb, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Due to the usual frustrating inability of being unable to finish any of the in-prep Tet Zoo articles (and… I’ve been away), I give you the following short article. Coelophysoids are best known for Coelophysis from the Upper Triassic of the USA; extremely similar (perhaps congeneric) forms are known from the Lower Jurassic of Zimbabwe, [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

All Your Yesterdays, our new book

All Your Yesterdays is here. The cover art (featuring juvenile troodontids) is by Alvaro Rozalen.

Last year, John Conway, Memo Kosemen and myself published All Yesterdays (it also features skeletal reconstructions by the brilliant Scott Hartman), a book that focused specifically on the more speculative aspects of palaeoart: follow the links below for more on this project. If you liked All Yesterdays, you’ll be pleased to hear that there’s a sequel, [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

The Jehol-Wealden International Conference, 2013

Jehol-Wealden-2013-banner-600-px-tiny-Sept-2013

This Friday and Saturday (20th and 21st September, 2013), the National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, is hosting the Jehol-Wealden International Conference. This event – titled Celebrating Dinosaur Island – features an impressive list of talks and events relating to the Lower Cretaceous biota of Europe and Asia. More info (and booking advice) here. Items [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

21st Century Dinosaur Revolution

Primary achievement of the 21st Century: MEMES. This from John Conway's series on Hypsilophodon.

A recent tour of the Natural History Museum (London) bookshop reminded me that my 2009 book, The Great Dinosaur Discoveries (A & C Black in the UK, University of California Press in the USA), is still on sale and in demand. Buy it here on amazon and here on amazon.co.uk. Thoughts on this book (including [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Brilliant Brazilian spinosaurids

Rio-May-2013-DNPM-Angaturama-skeleton-head-end-right-lateral-600-px-tiny-May-2013-Darren-Naish-Tetrapod-Zoology

You liked the photo of the brilliant Angaturama skeletal mount, right? Photographed at the Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, the mount shows Angaturama limai – a spinosaurine spinosaurid – carrying the skeleton of an anhanguerid pterosaur. Here are some more views of the same display… The behavioural interaction you see here was not just invented in [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Dinosaurs and their ‘exaggerated structures’: species recognition aids, or sexual display devices?

Mesozoic dinosaurs of several lineages famously possessed horns, frills, bony bosses, crests, frills, blah blah blah – you’ve heard all this a million times before. Pterosaurs were flamboyant creatures too. Why did these animals possess these so-called exaggerated structures? Together with Dave Hone, I’ve just published my latest missive on this issue (Hone & Naish [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

All Yesterdays: the talks!

The three talks given at the All Yesterdays launch earlier this month are now viewable online. I’ve been having trouble getting them viewable here at Tet Zoo: here’s mine (with a link to the youtube appearance below)… All Yesterdays Book Launch Talk – Darren Naish For John’s go here; for Memo’s go here. I will [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Did Velociraptor and Archaeopteryx climb trees? Claws and climbing in birds and other dinosaurs

Two weeks ago I and colleagues published a new paper in the august open-access online pages of PLoS ONE. Led by Aleksandra Birn-Jeffery of the Royal Veterinary College, and co-authored by Charlotte Miller, Emily Rayfield, Dave Hone and myself, the paper is titled ‘Pedal claw curvature in birds, lizards and Mesozoic dinosaurs – complicated categories [...]

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