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Posts Tagged "mammalogy"

Symbiartic

I Want A Carl Buell Coffee Table Book

Carl_Buell_Mammoth_mini

A while back an illustrator I consider a friend and mentor sent me an amazing birthday gift: It’s a mammoth by Carl Buell. Buell, you’ll likely already know, is the greatest living painter of extinct mammalian fauna today. Because I’m a terrible indoor photographer, let’s look at it the way it was intended. I met [...]

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Symbiartic

Road Kill So Perty You Can Bring It Home To Ma

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Most people swerve around road kill in hopes of avoiding the gore, or worse, the dreaded thwump that indicates you added your treadmarks to the list of said road kill’s insults. But a few crazy people will screech to a halt to see what got hit. Two of these folks just happen to be researchers, [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Pronghorn, designed by committee

Neat diagram from one of the Orbis World of Wildlife volumes, written by Felix Rodriguez de la Fuente.

So much for posting more on ratites – alas, I just haven’t had time to finish the next article. Inspired by an article recently published by my friend and homeboy Brian Switek, I thought it time to republish this 2010 article. Enjoy. The Pronghorn or Pronghorn antelope* Antilocapra americana is a strikingly unique artiodactyl, endemic to [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Mystery big cat skulls from the Peruvian Amazon not so mysterious anymore

Skulls and accompanying life restorations of (A) the Peruvian 'Anomalous jaguar' and (B) 'Peruvian tiger'; image by Gustavo Sanchez.

Scientific projects are very often years in the making. Within the past few days, I’ve had a new paper appear in the open-access journal PeerJ. It’s co-written with Manabu Sakamoto, Peter Hocking and Gustavo Sanchez. Therein, we examine and, we think, resolve the previously vexing identity of two big cat skulls obtained in the Peruvian [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Reasons for really liking wildebeest

Brindled wildebeest, photographed at Kruger National Park by Chris Eason. Image licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

There are lots of reasons for liking wildebeest… or gnus. For me, the main one comes from the fact that they are insanely flamboyant in appearance. Check out all the stuff we have going on in the best known and most widespread of the two (read on) species, the Brindled or Blue wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus: [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Homage to The Velvet Claw, again

The Velvet Claw, the book. You should own it.

At long last, somebody has uploaded (at least some of) The Velvet Claw to youtube. What’s The Velvet Claw, I hear you ask? Well, actually, I probably don’t hear you ask, seeing as you probably know already. Indeed, if you’re a long-term Tet Zoo reader, you’ll have heard me talk about it before. And here [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Happy 8th birthday Tetrapod Zoology: 2013 in review

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It’s January 21st, meaning that, once again, a year has passed and that much-loved internet phenomenon known at Tetrapod Zoology is fully one year older. Eight years of Tet Zoo… it seems incredible that I’ve been doing this for nearly a decade now. In fact, that’s scary. As is tradition, my aim here is simply [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

North America: land of obscure, freaky voles

Arborimus, based on a photo in Nowak (1999). Image by Darren Naish, colouring by Gareth Monger. CC BY.

As a European person, I find European voles (and, to a degree, Asian voles) pretty familiar, commonplace, homely. Still interesting, mind you. But when it comes to North American voles — oh my god, the weird. I don’t even know where to start, so I’ll just launch right in and hope that the crazy string [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Of vole plagues and hip glands

Bank vole. Image by soebe, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

You’ll already know what voles are. They’re blunt-nosed, comparatively short-tailed rodents with chunky bodies and rounded ears that are mostly concealed by fur. They often have open-rooted (or near open-rooted) teeth and perform well as grass-eaters (as you know, the silica crystals embedded in grass blades make them nasty, abrasive things to eat on a [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

A new living species of large mammal: hello, Tapirus kabomani!

Illustration of Tapirus kabomani by G. Braga, from Cozzuol et al. (2013).

For some considerable time now, there have been rumours of an incredible zoological discovery: a new species of living perissodactyl – a tapir – due to be announced from the Amazon. At long last, the paper is out. Published in Journal of Mammalogy, and authored by Mario Cozzuol and a team of colleagues, it describes [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Odobenocetops: ridiculous ‘walrus whales’

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I always hoped that, one day, I’d have time to talk at length about Odobenocetops, one of the strangest and most exciting of fossil cetaceans. Alas, I haven’t yet found that time, so here are a few slides on the beast from one of my fossil marine mammal lectures. Odobenocetops was originally described by Muizon [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

The remarkable life appearance of the Woolly rhino

Cast of the famous Starunia Woolly rhino, on display at London's Natural History Museum. Photo by Darren Naish, CC BY.

One of the Pleistocene mammals depicted without fail in popular books – encyclopedias of prehistoric life and the like – is the Woolly rhinoceros Coelodonta antiquitatis (the species name is written antiquus in many sources). Originally named in 1807 (but known for some time prior), this cold-adapted, shaggy-coated rhinocerotid rhino occurred from the Atlantic fringes [...]

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