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Posts Tagged "hoofed mammals"

Tetrapod Zoology

Pronghorn, designed by committee

Neat diagram from one of the Orbis World of Wildlife volumes, written by Felix Rodriguez de la Fuente.

So much for posting more on ratites – alas, I just haven’t had time to finish the next article. Inspired by an article recently published by my friend and homeboy Brian Switek, I thought it time to republish this 2010 article. Enjoy. The Pronghorn or Pronghorn antelope* Antilocapra americana is a strikingly unique artiodactyl, endemic to [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

The remarkable life appearance of the Woolly rhino

Cast of the famous Starunia Woolly rhino, on display at London's Natural History Museum. Photo by Darren Naish, CC BY.

One of the Pleistocene mammals depicted without fail in popular books – encyclopedias of prehistoric life and the like – is the Woolly rhinoceros Coelodonta antiquitatis (the species name is written antiquus in many sources). Originally named in 1807 (but known for some time prior), this cold-adapted, shaggy-coated rhinocerotid rhino occurred from the Atlantic fringes [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Fantastic asses

Kiang male (left) and female at Edinburgh Zoo, photo by Darren Naish.

Come on, this is Tetrapod Zoology: you knew those asses would be of the equid kind, right? I don’t think there’s been much on Tet Zoo about equids yet, nor about perissodactyls at all (a crime, given my strong interest in fossil rhinos). See the links below, however. I’ve taken various wild ass photos at [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Great Asian cattle

When unable to produce anything new, I resort to the extensive Tet Zoo archives. Here’s an article from ver 2, first published in April 2009… Cattle are another of those groups of animals that are really pretty incredible once you take the time to look at, and think about, them. The size, power and awesome [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Eld’s deer: endangered, persisting in fragmented populations, and morphologically weird… but it wasn’t always so

This is Eld’s deer Cervus eldi* or the Brow-antlered deer, Thamin or Tamin, a moderately obscure, CITES-listed Old World deer discovered (by Lt. Percy Eld) in India in 1839. It was later found to occur in fragmented populations across much of south-east Asia and also in southern China. Fossils are known from Java and it [...]

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