ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "artiodactyls"

Tetrapod Zoology

South America’s very many remarkable deer

Fine specimen of South Andean huemul. Photo by Ricardo Hevia Kaluf, CC BY-SA 3.0.

Deer are strongly associated with Eurasia and North America and less so with the other regions of the world. In this brief article – part of which is an excerpt from my 2013 article on the conservation status of South American mammals (Naish 2013) – I’m going to say a few things about the deer [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

Duikers once more

Common duiker in profile; image in public domain.

Time for another classic from the archives. This article originally appeared on Tet Zoo ver 2 back in August 2008 (my god… about six years ago), and appears here in tweaked, updated form. Duikers or cephalophines are an entirely African group of bovids, and so far as we know they have never gotten out of [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

Pronghorn, designed by committee

Neat diagram from one of the Orbis World of Wildlife volumes, written by Felix Rodriguez de la Fuente.

So much for posting more on ratites – alas, I just haven’t had time to finish the next article. Inspired by an article recently published by my friend and homeboy Brian Switek, I thought it time to republish this 2010 article. Enjoy. The Pronghorn or Pronghorn antelope* Antilocapra americana is a strikingly unique artiodactyl, endemic to [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

Reasons for really liking wildebeest

Brindled wildebeest, photographed at Kruger National Park by Chris Eason. Image licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

There are lots of reasons for liking wildebeest… or gnus. For me, the main one comes from the fact that they are insanely flamboyant in appearance. Check out all the stuff we have going on in the best known and most widespread of the two (read on) species, the Brindled or Blue wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus: [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

Great Asian cattle

When unable to produce anything new, I resort to the extensive Tet Zoo archives. Here’s an article from ver 2, first published in April 2009… Cattle are another of those groups of animals that are really pretty incredible once you take the time to look at, and think about, them. The size, power and awesome [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

Eld’s deer: endangered, persisting in fragmented populations, and morphologically weird… but it wasn’t always so

This is Eld’s deer Cervus eldi* or the Brow-antlered deer, Thamin or Tamin, a moderately obscure, CITES-listed Old World deer discovered (by Lt. Percy Eld) in India in 1839. It was later found to occur in fragmented populations across much of south-east Asia and also in southern China. Fossils are known from Java and it [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

Because giraffes are heartless creatures, and other musings

Those of you who read the recent Tet Zoo article on The Second International Workshop on Sauropod Biology and Gigantism may have been wondering about the odd picture I showed in one of the slides of my talk. It was some sort of ‘survival of the fittest’ cartoon posed as a multi-choice exam question: it [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

The noble tradition of military goats

The use of animals in military ceremony and warfare has always interested me. On a trip to Cardiff (Wales) in 2010 I encountered the stuffed Qatar goat Billy of the Royal Welch Fusiliers. It turns out that all the Royal Welch* Fusilier goats are called William of Windsor (Billy for short). They have a ration [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

Artiodactyls and steep slopes, and a new banner for Tet Zoo

While on fieldwork recently, I got to see something that I considered pretty remarkable. A series of loud, weird shrieks alerted us to the presence of a large mammal. It emerged from foliage on the side of an impossibly steep cliff and proceeded to clamber up the slope without much difficulty.  Pretty impressive. Here’s what it [...]

Keep reading »
Tetrapod Zoology

The seemingly endless weirdosity of the Milu

Thanks to everyone who had a go at identifying the ‘mystery object’ I was recently photographed holding. Obviously, said object is an antler. So, well done if you got that bit right. But it’s a very weird antler. It obviously comes from one of the larger deer species and is consistent in overall anatomy with [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Black Friday/Cyber Monday Blow-Out Sale

Enter code:
HOLIDAY 2014
at checkout

Get 20% off now! >

X

Email this Article

X