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"anurans"

Tadpole nests, past and present

Thanks to that recent Tet Zoo article about American spadefoot toads and their tadpoles, I've had visions in my mind of drying ephemeral pools in hot, arid environments, crammed with crowded, gasping tadpoles.

January 3, 2015 — Darren Naish
Parsley frogs: spadefoots without spades

Parsley frogs: spadefoots without spades

Anurans - frogs and toads - haven't received enough coverage on Tet Zoo of late, so here's one of several efforts to redress the balance. For no particular reason, in this article I want to talk about pelobatoids, also known as anomocoelans: the anuran group that (as conventionally conceived) includes spadefoot toads (Pelobatidae) and parsley [...]

December 28, 2014 — Darren Naish
`Strange bedfellow frogs' (part I): rotund, adorable brevicipitids

`Strange bedfellow frogs' (part I): rotund, adorable brevicipitids

Suddenly and unexpectedly, I have the urge to write about frogs. Today we look briefly at the first of two behaviourally peculiar, anatomically surprising groups, both of which are endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, both of which belong to a major neobatrachian frog clade called Allodapanura, and both of which have been united in a clade [...]

January 13, 2015 — Darren Naish

Gladiatorial glassfrogs, redux

Readers with supernaturally good memories might remember the two articles, published here back in January and February 2013, on glassfrogs, a highly unusual and poorly known group of Neotropical frogs, so named due to their incredible translucent or transparent ventral skin.

January 5, 2015 — Darren Naish

It's the Helmeted water toad… this time, with information!

Back in October 2007 (at Tet Zoo ver 2) I wrote a very brief article on a poorly known, gigantic, deeply weird South American frog: the Helmeted water toad, Chilean giant frog or Gay's frog* Calyptocephalella gayi (long known - incorrectly it turns out - as Caudiverbera caudiverbera).

January 15, 2015 — Darren Naish

There is so much more to flying frogs than flying frogs

Episode 2 of David Attenborough's Conquest of the Skies appeared on TV the other day, and I watched it (in fact, I livetweeted throughout, mostly because I wanted to talk about their portrayal of pterosaurs and Mesozoic theropods).

January 11, 2015 — Darren Naish

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