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"robotics"15 articles archived since 1845

Need a Hand? Now You Can Print One

"Every 4 1/2 minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect." That translates to 1 of just 33 babies being born with a defect in the U.S. Of these, about 1,500 babies, or 4 out of every 10,000 babies are born missing a hand or arm ("upper limb reduction").

March 6, 2014 — Judy Stone

Meet Your Dr. Octopus: Surgical Octo Arms

Robotic surgery has proved itself to be less than perfect so far. Stiff robotic limbs, burning surfaces, numerous complications. But what if that surgeon’s assistant was less like a standard robot—and more like an octopus?

June 30, 2014 — Katherine Harmon Courage

Box–The Synthesis of Real and Digital Space (with Robots!)

Watch, and have your mind bent, blown, and boggled. Astounding. Appropriately, this video ends with the Arthur C. Clarke quote, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” If you’ve recovered from your state of awe and want to learn more about this performance, I’ve grabbed a couple of descriptions directly from the website “Bot [...]

September 25, 2013 — Joanne Manaster

Scientists Move to Patent Octopus Robot

Scientists have spent years crafting a very special, creepy robot. One that can crawl over obstacles, swim through surf and grasp just about any object.

March 31, 2014 — Katherine Harmon Courage

Will the Robot Uprising Be Squishy?

Octopuses offer an extreme engineering challenge: They are almost infinitely flexible, entirely soft-bodied and incredibly intelligent. Are we vertebrate humans ever going to be able to build anything as deformable and complex as a real octopus?

July 26, 2013 — Katherine Harmon
Solar-Powered Ford Aims to Drive Off-Grid

Solar-Powered Ford Aims to Drive Off-Grid

Solar-powered cars have been little more than a novelty to date, experimental vehicles resembling photovoltaic-laden surfboards designed mostly for racing across deserts.

January 3, 2014 — Larry Greenemeier

Stunning Live Visual Effects in Box

Wow. This is the most awesome thing I saw yesterday, even though I watched – and enjoyed – Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.. This short video entitled, “Box,” packed a bigger punch in five minutes than Joss Whedon and ABC did in an hour.

September 25, 2013 — Brian Malow
New Views into the Octopus’s Bizarre Moves

New Views into the Octopus’s Bizarre Moves

We’ve known for centuries that octopuses get around one of two ways: one, by crawling over surfaces with their arms, or, two, swimming with the help of their siphon’s jet.

November 21, 2013 — Katherine Harmon Courage

Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2015

What innovations are leaping out of the labs to shape the world in powerful ways? Identifying those compelling innovations is the charge of the Meta-Council on Emerging Technologies, one of the World Economic Forum’s network of expert communities that form the Global Agenda Councils, which today released its Top 10 List of Emerging Technologies for [...]

March 4, 2015 — Mariette DiChristina

Wireless Robot Octopus Swims with the Fishes [Video]

Robot octopuses can already walk, jet along and even grasp tools. But new advances have these machines swimming faster than ever. And thanks to the addition of soft, fleshy webs, they’re starting to look—and move—much more like the real thing, too.

September 26, 2014 — Katherine Harmon Courage
Robot Octopus Swims with Lifelike Arms [Video]

Robot Octopus Swims with Lifelike Arms [Video]

Most octopuses get around primarily by crawling along the seafloor. And if they need to get somewhere in a hurry, they can employ their funnels to jet away like their pelagic cousins, squid.

August 1, 2013 — Katherine Harmon Courage

What Is the Uncanny Valley? [Video]

Lifelike robots and animations can elicit a response that’s somewhere between uncomfortable and creeped out. Scientific American editor Larry Greenemeier explains why in our latest Instant Egghead video: More to explore: What Should a Robot Look Like?

October 28, 2013 — Joss Fong

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