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Posts Tagged "iq"

Beautiful Minds

How Does IQ Relate to Personality?

boy behind a desk

Personality and IQ have traditionally been viewed as distinct domains of human functioning. However, research over the past three decades suggests that IQ is a personality trait. In an excellent book chapter in The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence, personality neuroscientist Colin DeYoung points out that many personality traits involve cognitive processes and abilities. It’s just [...]

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Beautiful Minds

The Heritability of Intelligence: Not What You Think

Diversity of the Mind

One of the longest standing assumptions about the nature of human intelligence has just been seriously challenged. According to the traditional “investment” theory, intelligence can be classified into two main categories: fluid and crystallized. Differences in fluid intelligence are thought to reflect novel, on-the-spot reasoning, whereas differences in crystallized intelligence are thought to reflect previously acquired [...]

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Beautiful Minds

Mind Wandering: A New Personal Intelligence Perspective

daydreamer1

Once accused of being absent-minded, the founder of American Psychology, William James, quipped that he was really just present-minded to his own thoughts. Most recent studies depict mind wandering as a costly cognitive failure with relatively few benefits (Mooneyham and Schooler, 2013). This perspective makes sense when mind wandering is observed by a third party [...]

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Beautiful Minds

IQ Test Controversies Persist

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What do IQ tests measure? Can intelligence be improved? How should we select students for gifted and talented programs? How well do IQ tests predict success in life? How important are characteristics such as self-regulation and ambition? What about deliberate practice? What is the neuroscience of intelligence? These are some of the most hot button issues facing us today [...]

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Beautiful Minds

In Defense of Intelligent Testing

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I recently published a book called Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined. With a title like that, you’d think the book is one big anti-IQ, anti-testing manifesto. It isn’t. While the IQ test certainly has a less than pretty history of abuse and misuse, we can learn a lot about a child’s educational needs through the responsible use of intelligent testing. A [...]

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Beautiful Minds

Is Your Child Ungifted?

PROLOGUE

  When Jay Leno asked Steve Carell how his kids were doing, he didn’t seem too concerned: “I hate it when people talk about kids on talk shows. I hate it, because every person who talks about their kids, their kids are obviously the most intelligent and the cutest. They’re all very, very gifted children. Ask [...]

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Beautiful Minds

Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined

Ungifted

Hardcover | E-book | Audio book Here’s to the kids who are different, The kids who don’t always get A’s The kids who have ears twice the size of their peers, And noses that go on for days . . . Here’s to the kids who are different, The kids they call crazy or dumb, The kids [...]

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Beautiful Minds

The Complexity of Greatness: Beyond Talent or Practice

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What is greatness and how do people get there? Is greatness born or made? Is greatness the result of talent or practice? Few other questions have caused such intense debate, controversy, and diversity of opinions. The heights of human accomplishment have always fascinated us, and for good reason. The striving for greatness is a fundamental [...]

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Beautiful Minds

Introducing Beautiful Minds

kid on playground

When I was a kid, I was diagnosed with a learning disability. By the age of three, I had already suffered from twenty-one ear infections. As a result, I developed “Central Auditory Processing Disorder,” which made it very difficult for me to process auditory input in real time. For much of my youth, I felt as [...]

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Guest Blog

The Politics of the Null Hypothesis

ResearchBlogging.org

To what degree these and other differences originate in biology must be determined by research, not fatwa. History tells us that how much we want to believe a proposition is not a reliable guide as to whether it is true. –Steven Pinker, commenting on Lawrence Summers in the The New Republic In late April, Dr. [...]

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Guest Blog

You can increase your intelligence: 5 ways to maximize your cognitive potential

"One should not pursue goals that are easily achieved. One must develop an instinct for what one can just barely achieve through one’s greatest efforts." —Albert Einstein While Einstein was not a neuroscientist, he sure knew what he was talking about in regards to the human capacity to achieve. He knew intuitively what we can [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Do Music Lessons Make You Smarter?

Practice makes progress, if not perfection, for most things in life. Generally, practicing a skill—be it basketball, chess or the tuba—mostly makes you better at whatever it was you practiced. Even related areas do not benefit much. Doing intensive basketball drills does not usually make a person particularly good at football. Chess experts are not [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

How Do You Spot a Genius?

Drawing of Bobby Fischer and chess board

The November/December Scientific American Mind, which debuted online today, examines the origins of genius, a concept that inspires both awe and confusion. Some equate genius with IQ or creativity; others see it as extraordinary accomplishment. As this issue reveals, genius seems to arise from a mosaic of forces that coalesce into a perfect storm of [...]

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Talking back

Will “Call of Duty” Be Assigned for 10th Grade (Gaming) Homework?

Two prominent neuroscientists have published a commentary in the Feb. 28th Nature suggesting that video games might be crafted to improve brain function and enhance personal well-being. In “Games To Do You Good,” they cite prospects for bettering performance on behavioral measures ranging from visual perception to altruism. Daphne Bavelier of the University of Rochester [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Intelligence, Cancer, and Eyjafjallaj

ResearchBlogging.org

This seems to have become unofficial volcano week, here at ScienceBlogs. If you haven’t been following the coverage of the Eyjafjallaj

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