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Posts Tagged "scienceart"

Image of the Week

A Genome is Not a Blueprint

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Image: 1936 Joy Oil gas station blueprints (top); sequence from human chromosome 1 (bottom). Source: from A Monkey’s Blueprint by Martin Krzywinski on SA Visual When artist Martin Krzywinski was challenged to come up with a graphic that quickly and concisely shows how the human genome is more similar to chimpanzee and bonobo genomes than [...]

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Image of the Week

Have a Heart, Kill Your Lawn

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Source: Katie McKissick’s Symbiartic post: Don’t Be a Water Jerk. Image © Katie McKissick Few things are more inviting than a flawless green turf, stretching out before you like a luscious green tumbling mat – unless, of course, that lawn is in the Southwestern United States and you are aware of the severity of the [...]

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Image of the Week

A Mitey Claw

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If the key to happiness is appreciating the little things in life, then take a moment to appreciate the claw of a microscopic mite only 600 µm long. It’s from a new species discovered in the soil of a chestnut plantation where they use their nubbles and knobs (technically known as palettes) to “swim” through [...]

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Image of the Week

The 500-lb. Chicken From Hell

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Source: 500-Pound “Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Once Roamed North America by Kate Wong at Observations Illustration credit: Mark Klingler, Carnegie Museum of Natural History Nothing you could find in any hen house could prepare you for the 11.5-foot tall, 500-lb. behemoth that roamed the landscape 66-million years ago in what is today North and South [...]

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Image of the Week

Tragically Beautiful

DFA186: Hadēs by Brandon Ballengée

Source: ScienceArt On View in March/April 2014 on Symbiartic Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide, and those that remain are increasingly falling victim to environmental pollutants that cause deformities such as extra limbs and ambiguous sexual organs. Brandon Ballengée’s work aims to draw attention to their plight through visually arresting [...]

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Symbiartic

Three Artists Tackle the Same Science: An Experiment in ScienceArt & Blogging

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This July, Symbiartic will celebrate its 4th birthday along with the entire Scientific American Blog Network. To date, we have featured more than 230 science artists in over 460 posts as the field continues to expand and come into its own. Featuring other peoples’ work and being a part of this burgeoning field has been [...]

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Symbiartic

An Intricate 3D-Printed Dress, No Assembly Required

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One of the most inspired design studios working at the intersection of science, art, and technology today is Nervous System, a Massachusetts-based team led by Jessica Rosenkrantz and Jesse Louis-Rosenberg. In the past, I have touted their spectacular lamps, housewares, and jewelry designed with algorithms derived from patterns in nature and printed in 3D in [...]

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Symbiartic

Science and Art Exhibits To Launch 2015

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The number of exhibits combining science and art in some capacity has grown steadily since I began blogging about them in 2011. With exhibits in galleries and museums across the country, there’s something for everyone. Enjoy! EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION WILDERNESS FOREVER: 50 Years of Protecting America’s Wild Places September 3, 2014 – TBD Smithsonian Museum [...]

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Symbiartic

A Photographic Survey of the American Yard

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Though it’s tempting to think you must spend thousands of dollars on equipment to take great photographs, Joshua White is helping prove that the best camera is the one you have on you when the inspiration strikes. His series, titled “A Photographic Survey of the American Yard,” is taken entirely with his iPhone and is [...]

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Symbiartic

A Last-Last Minute ScienceArt Gift Guide

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In my efforts to make the most original sciart gift guide I could muster earlier this month I overlooked some fantastic books that I want to plug today in case you’re doing any last minute shopping at bookstores. And if you buy through Amazon’s charity program, SMILE, you can designate the Guild of Natural Science [...]

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Symbiartic

10 Original Gifts for Science (and SciArt) Geeks

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It’s time again for me to offer up a few quirky gift ideas for the science enthusiasts in your life. I guarantee these will be the most original gifts under the tree! And the best part? Many are under $50. Squee! 10. Periodic Table Cutting Board by Elysium Woodworks, $45 on Etsy.com 9. Embroidered Anatomy [...]

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Symbiartic

What’s an Artist Doing at Fermilab?

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When a revered research institution reaches out to a fine artist to create its first ever artist-in-residency program, we should all sit up and take notice. This month, Fermilab, the celebrated particle physics research laboratory, announced a year-long partnership with artist Lindsay Olson. For those of us invested in promoting collaborations between artists and scientists, [...]

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Symbiartic

Small Science-Themed Art

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December 1st is the deadline to participate in an exciting annual exhibit at the Art.Science.Gallery in Austin, TX. For years, artists have created small trading cards to exchange amongst themselves at conferences and gatherings, but according to the rules of exchange, these cards must never be bought or sold. Art.Science.Gallery, a brick-and-mortar gallery in Austin, [...]

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Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

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For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

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Symbiartic

Inside a Changing Autumn Leaf

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One of the great wonders of life is watching the leaves change colors in the fall. When temperatures get cool, chlorophyll begins to break down revealing the underlying pigments in the plants’ sap. This depiction of the inner-workings of a maple leaf shows the process in action (see the annotated version that appeared in The [...]

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