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Posts Tagged "scienceart"

Image of the Week

A Mitey Claw

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If the key to happiness is appreciating the little things in life, then take a moment to appreciate the claw of a microscopic mite only 600 µm long. It’s from a new species discovered in the soil of a chestnut plantation where they use their nubbles and knobs (technically known as palettes) to “swim” through [...]

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Image of the Week

The 500-lb. Chicken From Hell

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Source: 500-Pound “Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Once Roamed North America by Kate Wong at Observations Illustration credit: Mark Klingler, Carnegie Museum of Natural History Nothing you could find in any hen house could prepare you for the 11.5-foot tall, 500-lb. behemoth that roamed the landscape 66-million years ago in what is today North and South [...]

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Image of the Week

Tragically Beautiful

DFA186: Hadēs by Brandon Ballengée

Source: ScienceArt On View in March/April 2014 on Symbiartic Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide, and those that remain are increasingly falling victim to environmental pollutants that cause deformities such as extra limbs and ambiguous sexual organs. Brandon Ballengée’s work aims to draw attention to their plight through visually arresting [...]

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Symbiartic

Reconstructing an Ancient Fin and Watching it Paddle to Fame

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Friends and colleagues who know that I illustrated Neil Shubin’s first book, Your Inner Fish, have been asking if I was involved in the three-part PBS series hosted by Shubin that will air next week on April 9th. The short answer is no. But I’m proud to say that I made this very model of [...]

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Symbiartic

‘Cosmos’ and ‘Your Inner Fish’ Pack the 1-2 Punch

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Two weeks from today, on April 9th, PBS will air the first of a three-part series adapted from Neil Shubin’s popular book, Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year-History of the Human Body. If you’ve ever wondered why we’re built the way we are – with five fingers on each hand, testes that hang [...]

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Symbiartic

Snake vs. Croc in Real and Hyper-Real Versions

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When illustrators embark upon a new illustration, hours of research and work go into constructing a scene that is believable, powerful, and informative. In 2009, when James Gurney was tasked with reconstructing Titanoboa, the largest snake that ever lived, his first priority was conveying the sheer size of a 48-foot long, 2500-lb. beast. Ultimately, he [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt on View in March/April 2014

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A fresh batch of exhibits combining science and art are going up around the country, plus, there’s still time to catch some of the longer running exhibits that go through the middle of 2014. From John J. Audubon to dark matter to hybrid bodies created with modern transplant technology, there’s something in here for everyone. [...]

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Symbiartic

20th-Century Math Hidden in 15th-Century Art

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Art and science are often thought of as disparate entities, drawing on different strengths and different ways of thinking. This is surely true, but the disciplines also share patterns of thought and essential characteristics. Take, for example, their inherently collaborative processes. No artist creates in a vacuum just as no scientists could perform the work [...]

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Symbiartic

Tools Change But Creative People Are a Constant

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Once upon a time, I wrote about five reasons your camera won’t steal my job. In short, the reasons were: 1. Photography can’t capture small things 2. Photography can’t capture distant things 3. Photography can’t capture extinct things 4. Photography can emphasize the wrong things 5. Photography is just one tool of many to master [...]

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Symbiartic

Scientists Discover the Very First Hipster

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You’ve seen the cartoon before: a fish hoisting itself up on land with its front fins, being greeted with some snarky sign like, “Evolve at your own risk,” or something similar. This fish has become a meme, so much so that when the discovery of Tiktaalik roseae, a 375-million year old fossil that displays a [...]

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Symbiartic

Start 2014 in Style With These ScienceArt Exhibits

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All in all, 2013 was a bang-up year for science art. It seems the genre is gaining ground as more and more exhibits tackle the fascinating possibilities that exist at the intersection of science and art. 2014 seems to be continuing the trend with a wide array of notably longer exhibits. Enjoy! EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION [...]

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Symbiartic

Original Gifts for Science and Art Geeks

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Looking for a knock-out gift for the science geek in your life? Look no further. If you like art and you like science, these artists, all featured on Symbiartic at one point, have gifts that will impress even the most jaded gift recipients… Made With Molecules Jewelry by Raven Hanna, PhD. Raven Hanna, PhD. left [...]

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Symbiartic

Happiness on a Chain: Is That An Oxymoron?

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Scientists are, in general, a rebellious bunch. But Raven Hanna, the brains behind Made With Molecules, may be more rebellious than most. After completing a PhD in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale and doing a post-doc at UC Berkeley, she left the well-trodden path to the Ivory Tower to live off the grid and [...]

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