ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "science illustration"

@ScientificAmerican

A Defense of Artistic License in Illustrations of Scientific Concepts

Detail of two illustration approaches

The other day, my own hypocrisy slapped me in the face. I was looking at a quantum illustration. One for which I had just encouraged an artist to develop a dimensional and detailed representation of a particle, that—by the author’s own admission—may or may not exist. And if it does exist, we certainly know nothing [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

4 Ways to Venus: An Artist’s Assignment

Geis_detail

Irving Geis (1908–1997) is probably best known for illustrations of biological macromolecules, such as his groundbreaking watercolor painting of myoglobin—an exhaustive and beautiful portrait of the first properly sorted protein molecule. (The work appears in “The Three-dimensional Structure of a Protein Molecule,” by John Kendrew, Scientific American, December 1961.) From 1948 through 1983 he lent [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

How I Reconciled My Love for Art and Science

crustacea_detail

In college in the 1990s, I suffered an identity crisis. Was I a scientist or an artist? I loved the clarity and order inherent to the scientific process; ask questions, set up methodologies, collect data, analyze. Research projects and papers I co-authored on the topics of trace fossils and hydrothermal vent species were immensely satisfying. [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

A Defense of Artistic License in Illustrations of Scientific Concepts

The other day, my own hypocrisy slapped me in the face. I was looking at a quantum illustration. One for which I had just encouraged an artist to develop a dimensional and detailed representation of a particle, that—by the author’s own admission—may or may not exist. And if it does exist, we certainly know nothing [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Learning the Art of Science Illustration

14-020FEATURE

If you’ve ever wondered what it would take to combine your love of science and art, there is a conference on the horizon that might just be the inspiration you’ve been waiting for. This summer in Boulder, CO, the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators is hosting its annual conference and it is not to be [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Start 2014 in Style With These ScienceArt Exhibits

13-055FEATURE

All in all, 2013 was a bang-up year for science art. It seems the genre is gaining ground as more and more exhibits tackle the fascinating possibilities that exist at the intersection of science and art. 2014 seems to be continuing the trend with a wide array of notably longer exhibits. Enjoy! EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Illustrated Books Are For Kids, Right? Nah.

Respectable books used to be illustrated. Then someone decided that picture books were for kids and boo hoo hoo, suddenly illustrations vanished from “serious” books. Well, I don’t know about you, but I like a book that’s secure enough in its content that it can throw a couple of illustrations inside and still call itself [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Children Exploding Out of Stars

Stardust-M-Soyeon-Kim-mini

  As the worlds of science and illustration continue to show, sometimes non-traditional forms of  illustration – the whimsical, the mysterious, the abstract – are the best ways to draw in a new audience to scientific ideas. The book You Are Stardust by author Elin Kelsey and illustrator Soyeon Kim (hey! We were students together!) transcends typical illustration [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

SciArt of the Day: Arach-attack!

12-031FEATURE

Marlin Peterson’s spectacular trompe l’oiel of two opiliones (commonly known as daddy long legs) atop Seattle’s Armory is bound to give arachnophobes a run for their money. Trompe l’oeil (literally “trip the eye”) is a classic mural technique that is used to create the illusion of a three-dimensional object on a flat surface. Because of [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Communicating Science: What’s Your Problem?

After reading Scicurious’ and Kate Clancy’s posts on science outreach and what a drag it is on already overworked and underpaid scientists, I feel like climbing to the top of the highest mountain in Whoville and exclaiming, “We are here! We are here! We are here! We are here!” For those of you who missed [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Special Universe

Get the latest Special Collector's edition

Secrets of the Universe: Past, Present, Future

Order Now >

X

Email this Article

X