ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "science communication"

Absolutely Maybe

Science in the Abstract: Don’t Judge a Study by its Cover

Cartoon in a lab - You said to do an abstract

A competition for attention lies at the heart of the scientific enterprise. And the abstract is its “blurb.” A scientific abstract is a summary used to attract readers to an article and to get a piece of research accepted for a conference presentation. Other than the title, it’s the part of an article that is [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

The Disease Prevention Illusion: A Tragedy in Five Parts

Cartoon of an early bird catching no worms

Act I: An ounce of “prevention.” “Prevention is better than cure.” Aphorisms like this go back a long way. And most of our dramatic triumphs against disease come from prevention: clean water, making roads and workplaces safer, antiseptic routines in hospital, reducing smoking, immunization, stemming the spread of HIV. Many of our cultural superstitions and greatest [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Open access 2013: A year of gaining momentum

Cartoon of old school closed science library

Was this the year open access for science reached critical mass? One hypothesis suggests that a transformative group needs to reach one-third to be prominent and persisting. Rogers’ theory on the diffusion of innovations that will eventually reach saturation level says the first 2.5% are innovators. By the time you get to 16% the phase [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Biomedical research: Believe it or not?

Report card cartoon

It’s not often that a research article barrels down the straight toward its one millionth view. Thousands of biomedical papers are published every day. Despite often ardent pleas by their authors to “Look at me! Look at me!,” most of those articles won’t get much notice. Attracting attention has never been a problem for this paper though. [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Statistical significance and its part in science downfalls

Cartoon of statistician on ward rounds

Imagine if there were a simple single statistical measure everybody could use with any set of data and it would reliably separate true from false. Oh, the things we would know! Unrealistic to expect such wizardry though, huh? Yet, statistical significance is commonly treated as though it is that magic wand. Take a null hypothesis [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Science buzz and criticism get a powerful boost

Cartoon about commenting at PubMed

The scientific literature is full of it. By which I mean, of course, spin, error and less-than-reliable results. All that noise makes it tough to keep up with what’s important to read and buzz about. But the biomedical research community has a new way to share opinions on what may or may not be worth [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Motivated reasoning: Fuel for controversies, conspiracy theories and science denialism alike

Conspiracy cartoon

Pieces of information, disputed and not, can be woven very quickly into competing explanatory narratives. Press the right buttons, then it can be lightning fast to order them into a line leading to this or that logical conclusion. Those narratives can cause feuds that won’t quit and entrenched positions of extreme certitude from which people [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Dancing, sand art and science: Communication by art-y means

Photo of dancing statistics

There’s something wonderful about those art forms that can bypass our adult selves and touch the child inside us. Sand art has that in spades. Its family members include building sand castles, but the kind I mean here is live performance art. It’s better to experience it than read an explanation of it. The first performance [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

#NYCSciTweetUp is Coming!

What are you doing next Thursday? I’ll tell you what—if you live in the New York City area, you’re going to the #NYCSciTweetUp! Join the gang on March 29th, at the Peculier Pub in NYC for an informal evening of science and networking.. Updated details can always be found on the Facebook page. And as per [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Making, Education, and Innovation: Inspiring Makers in Underrepresented Communities

Maker Faire invites young Makers to enter a world of innovation and imagination. If you can dream it, you can build it—particularly as experienced Makers are on-hand and willing to share what they know. How can we better encourage a broader participation in this science and technology showcase by underrepresented groups—beginning in the very neighborhood [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

#NYCSciTweetUp Follow-Up

The third #NYCSciTweetUp was a huge success! Thanks to all who came out to The Peculier Pub. It was a pleasure seeing so many new faces mingling with familiar ones! What is the tweetup, you ask? It’s an informal monthly (or so) gathering for the science community in New York City. As Story Collider‘s Ben [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Interested in Science? Come to the #NYCSciTweetUp on Aug. 9th

Every month or so, the science community in New York City gathers to talk science over beer. The event—or TweetUp if you will—began as a means of connecting the online science community offline, which is why it bears a hashtag in its name. While the gathering is still in its infancy, turnouts have been fairly [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Are We Hoarding Connections?

AiP_icon200

Ed Note: This article is from the Anthropology in Practice archives, and was originally posted on August 24th, 2010. I’ve elected to repost it given the introduction of the Google+, which offers (necessitates?) a new means to connect. Incidentally, if you would like connect with me on G+, you can find me at gplus.to/krystaldcosta. Facebook [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Picturing Science: Secrets of the Museum Revealed

To the public, museums are mysterious, magical places. Science, history, and context are carefully preserved and displayed—though the guy-wires are carefully hidden so as to not disturb the experience of the visitor. The work that goes into constructing the fancy dioramas and exhibits, the science that helps construct the scenes that we view as visitors [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

Facebook’s “I F*cking Love Science” does not f*cking love artists

IFLS_copyright

Elise Andrew runs the most popular Science page on facebook. I know so, because I see her content reshared dozens of times daily in my news feed. Well, it’s not really her content, but I’ll get back to that in a minute. The point is, I F*cking Love Science is big. By posting photos, cartoons, news [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

The Art of the Science Caption

Haploembia2f

I am not going to tell you what this animal is. At least, not yet. Instead, I’d like to use the absence of a caption to mention the importance of accompanying science images with the right text. Why? Artists and photographers spend enough time crafting images that it’d be a waste to lose potential viewers [...]

Keep reading »
Doing Good Science

More on rudeness, civility, and the care and feeding of online conversations.

composite-square-01

Late last month, I pondered the implications of a piece of research that was mentioned but not described in detail in a perspective piece in the January 4, 2013 issue of Science. [1] In its broad details, the research suggests that the comments that follow an online article about science — and particularly the perceived [...]

Keep reading »
Doing Good Science

Academic tone-trolling: How does interactivity impact online science communication?

composite-square-02

Later this week at ScienceOnline 2013, Emily Willingham and I are co-moderating a session called Dialogue or fight? (Un)moderated science communication online. Here’s the description: Cultivating a space where commentators can vigorously disagree with a writer–whether on a blog, Twitter, G+, or Facebook, *and* remain committed to being in a real dialogue is pretty challenging. [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Science Education and Changing People’s Minds: Writing to convince

I find online science communication fascinating. I am enthusiastic about its possibilities and intrigued by its challenges. With an interest in online communication, comes an interest in text. While videos, animations and images are powerful too, the written word is often the simplest and the default mode of online communication–-think blog posts, tweets, status updates, [...]

Keep reading »
Image of the Week

Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

DarrenNaishVaranidFEATURE

Artist: Darren Naish Source: Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on… it’s about monitor lizards, by Darren Naish on Tetrapod Zoology If you’re not a herpetologist, you may be of the mindset that lizards all look the same, but that would only expose you for what you are: a human primate, finely attuned to the faces [...]

Keep reading »
Not bad science

Unique Science Communication: Isabella Rossellini

hqdefault

I recently wrote an article about science communication, and in it mentioned that people can communicate science in many different ways using many different types of media. One more unusual way is what Isabella Rossellini has adopted. Using real animal behaviour science, she conveys it by dressing up as the animal in question, and presenting [...]

Keep reading »
Not bad science

How To Get Into Science Communication Online

pic1

I recently taught a class on science journalism and science communication. Although there have been a few articles on this topic already (in particular I’d recommend reading Ed Yong’s and Carl Zimmer’s) I thought I’d share a bit of advice from my own experience. I became involved in science writing just a few years ago, [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

On the Origin of White Power

KKK square

A new book argues race and genetics explain “the rise of the West.” Bad science explains the downfall of its ideas. Nicholas Wade is not a racist. In his new book, A Troublesome Inheritance, the former science writer for the New York Times states this explicitly. “It is not automatically racist to consider racial categories [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

The Allure of Gay Cavemen

"Cave Painting" by Nathaniel Gold

Third genders, two spirits, and a media without a clue. Author’s Note: Earlier this month the UK Daily Mail reported on continued excavation at an archaeological site near Prague where researchers described an individual with an alternative gender identity. The following post originally appeared at Neuron Culture hosted by Wired after the original report last [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Apes in the Suites and the Streets: Participatory Organizing from #Scio12 to #OccupyWallStreet

"@BoraChimp" by Nathaniel Gold

Conferences are social grooming events for relatively hairless apes. A few will stand before the multitude, beaming with pride or shaking with nervousness (as the case may be), and present the latest research in contemporary ape thought. As their vocalizations reach a crescendo, those sitting demurely below will produce flesh-slapping noises that indicate they were [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

The Uses of the Past: Why Science Writers Should Care About the History of Science – And Why Scientists Should Too

"The Anatomy Lesson of Homo sylvestris" by Nathaniel Gold

Whether we are exploring our family genealogy or the genetic tree of our primate ancestors, all of us have a common yearning to know from whence we came. Origin stories captivate our imagination and offer a narrative structure for better understanding where we are today. The reality is that a knowledge of the history of [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Probing the Passions of Science: Carl Zimmer Delves Beneath the Surface of Science Writing

Zimmer Square.jpg

Click here for Part One: Carl Zimmer on the Art of Science Writing Carl Zimmer has an uncanny knack for getting under your skin, quite literally. While travelling through the village of Tumbura in southern Sudan he encountered invisible monsters that live inside the subcutaneous tissue of their innocent victims. Under a microscope these creatures, [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Probing the Passions of Science: An Interview with Carl Zimmer on the Art of Science Writing

Zimmer Square.jpg

Click here for Part Two: Carl Zimmer Delves Beneath the Surface of Science Writing Carl Zimmer is one of the most insightful and trenchant science writers working today. Whether he is delving into the soul of the scientific revolution or exposing the precise horror of parasites to reveal our relationship with the natural world, he [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Male Chauvinist Chimps or the Meat Market of Public Opinion?

"Chimp with Monocle" by Nathaniel Gold

Author’s Note: The following originally appeared at Nature Network. It was subsequently selected as a PLoS ONE Pick of the Month, as a Finalist in the 2009 Quark Prize in Science and appeared in the 2009 edition of The Open Laboratory: The Best Science Writing on the Web (buy it here). You can still nominate entries for [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Frans de Waal on Political Apes, Science Communication, and Building a Cooperative Society

Frans de Waal by Nathaniel Gold

“It’s the animal in us,” we often hear when we’ve been bad. But why not when we’re good? This is the question that has driven Frans de Waal for the past 30 years. From his pioneering research on alliance formation in Chimpanzee Politics, to reconciliation behavior in Peacemaking Among Primates and Good Natured, to the [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Knowledge, Knowledge Everywhere: Do Social Networks Spread or Drown Health & Science News?

Southwell_Picture

We live in an age of constant data. Between television, the Internet, and  our “real-life” social circles, society has never before had as much access to health and science news as we now enjoy — and it has never been so easy for anyone to access an entire encyclopedia of information about any health or [...]

Keep reading »
Roots of Unity

Apply Now for an AAAS Mass Media Fellowship

The 2012 Mass Media Fellows at orientation in Washington, DC. Image: Jessica McDonald.

I started writing about math and science in June 2012 thanks to an AAAS Mass Media Fellowship sponsored by the American Mathematical Society. Every year, the fellowship provides opportunities for math and science graduate students to work for mass media outlets such as Scientific American (where I worked), NPR, the Chicago Tribune, and so on. [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

Don’t Just Visualize Data—Visceralize It

Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew (December 7, 1972). Image courtesy of NASA Johnson Space Center

The title of this post borrows from ideas presented by Sha Hwang at the Visualized conference in New York City several weeks ago: He kicked off the data-visualization event with a talk that—in effect—challenged the audience to take a step back. Way back. And then to look again, with fresh unblinking eyes. What does a [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Heat Up This Summer

14-021FEATURE

Take a break from the heat this summer to step into some cool galleries exhibiting scienceart. If the exhibits keep pouring in at this rate, I’ll have to split up this post by region. There are five scienceart exhibits in New York alone! But for those of you who are not in the NY-region, don’t [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Learning the Art of Science Illustration

14-020FEATURE

If you’ve ever wondered what it would take to combine your love of science and art, there is a conference on the horizon that might just be the inspiration you’ve been waiting for. This summer in Boulder, CO, the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators is hosting its annual conference and it is not to be [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

A DIY Fossil Hunting Activity for Pre-K Classrooms

14-019FEATURE

The following project constitutes a half-hour activity for 3-, 4-, or 5-year olds. It includes the entire process from finding fossils to putting the recovered pieces together like a puzzle to drawing our best guess at what it looked like in life. The details of the project are based on my experience working in Neil [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

For Admirers of Audubon & Sibley, Two Recurring Art Exhibits

14-017FEATURE

If you appreciate John J. Audubon’s exacting detail and beautiful compositions and you marvel at the encyclopedic knowledge and delicate illustrations in the famous Sibley Bird Guides you may be interested to know that there are many contemporary masters following in their footsteps today. Their names may be less well-known, but their work is equally [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

The ScienceArt Exhibit Roundup for Spring

14-015FEATURE

This is the dish on the latest exhibits combining science and art around the country. This time the prize for the most bumpin’ scienceArt scene goes to the Northeast, amirite? Lucky you if you live there: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION JESSICA DRENK: An Allegory of Algorithms and Aesthetics April 12 – May 12, 2014 Adah Rose [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Reconstructing an Ancient Fin and Watching it Paddle to Fame

14-012FEATURE

Friends and colleagues who know that I illustrated Neil Shubin’s first book, Your Inner Fish, have been asking if I was involved in the three-part PBS series hosted by Shubin that will air next week on April 9th. The short answer is no. But I’m proud to say that I made this very model of [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

What If All The Images Went Away

noimg_mini

Last week on Twitter and Facebook, I leveled criticisms at particular sites and railed against improper image use in science communication. Again. After arguing with (arguably) allies in science communication I was fed up. Fed up with the attitude that unattributed images are just a (small) sacrifice for the net good of science communication to [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

ScienceArt on View in March/April 2014

14-007FEATURE

A fresh batch of exhibits combining science and art are going up around the country, plus, there’s still time to catch some of the longer running exhibits that go through the middle of 2014. From John J. Audubon to dark matter to hybrid bodies created with modern transplant technology, there’s something in here for everyone. [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Why do SciArt Groups need Social Media? – Guide Part 1

SocialMedia_mini1

  Guide to Social Media for SciArt Groups – Part 1 Introduction The past several years I have participated in forum discussions, Twitter chats, moderated sessions and presentations for a number of groups at the art+science boundary. One problem I have had is that these talks have been somewhat walled-off and exclusive to each group. [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

I Want A Carl Buell Coffee Table Book

Carl_Buell_Mammoth_mini

A while back an illustrator I consider a friend and mentor sent me an amazing birthday gift: It’s a mammoth by Carl Buell. Buell, you’ll likely already know, is the greatest living painter of extinct mammalian fauna today. Because I’m a terrible indoor photographer, let’s look at it the way it was intended. I met [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Science on Screen in LA Tomorrow: Bestiaire followed by Q&A

Tomorrow night, Friday February 22 at 7:30pm, Cinefamily and and Cinespia Salon will present the latest installment of the their Science on Screen series at the old Silent Movie Theater in Los Angeles. The evening’s screening will feature an independent film called Bestiaire. A truly breathtaking exploration of interspecies observation, Bestiaire is the rare documentary [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Putting Science on Screen (A Tale Told In Tweets)

disney chimpanzee

What responsibilities do filmmakers have in terms of scientific accuracy? Usually, I argue that filmmakers are storytellers first, and while scientific accuracy (or plausibility) can often support a narrative, the first responsibility of the filmmaker is to weave a captivating tale. But what happens when the film (or TV series) in question is overtly scientific [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

A Fishy Beachfront Orgy: The Tweet That Became An Article

grunion-jason-1

Earlier this summer, evolutionary biologist, wildlife photographer, and (most importantly) my friend Neil Losin asked if I wanted to drive down to Long Beach with him to check out the grunion run, and try to get some decent photos of it. We went, and it was awesome, so I tweeted about it. You guys. You [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Sidewalk Science: A Different Approach To Outreach

sidewalk science-resized

Last week (June 5, 2012), the lucky citizens of Earth were in just the right place to watch Venus’s transit across the face of the sun. While this occurred just eight years ago as well, it won’t happen again for more than a century. The next time any Earthling will be able to watch Venus [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Science and Science Communication at EB2012 [SLIDEDECK]

Here is a slightly modified version of the slidedeck I used in my talk at Experimental Biology this weekend. Jason G. Goldman EB2012 science communication View more presentations from jgold85 For more on getting started in science blogging, see my Science Blogging 101 series: Science Blogging 101: Part 1 Science Blogging 101: Part 2 – [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Science and Social Media at Experimental Biology in San Diego

eb2012-crop

Just a quick announcement that I’ll be joining fellow SA blogger Danielle Lee, Dr. Isis, and Pascale Lane in what promises to be the “world’s most amazingest session ever” on Saturday at 3pm at the Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego.

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Open Lab 2011! (but really 2012)

The final 50 posts (plus one poem) that will comprise the next edition of the yearly anthology of the best science writing on the web have been officially announced by this year’s editor Jennifer Ouellette. Having served as editor for last year’s edition, I know just how hard and painful the editing process can be [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Marie Curie, Theater, and Science Communication: An Interview with Alan Alda

Alda Headshot_High-Res

I grew up watching M*A*S*H reruns with my dad, so even early in life, Alan Alda, who played Dr. Hawkeye Pierce throughout the show’s eleven seasons, was a familiar name and face. You might also recognize him from TV shows like The West Wing or movies like Murder at 1600. What you might not know [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Engaging Undergrads with Wikipedia

Longtime science blog readers will certainly remember the popular cognitive psychology blog Cognitive Daily, written by Greta and Dave Munger, that had a fantastic five-year run at Scienceblogs. While Dave is still involved in the science blogging community through projects like Research Blogging and Science Seeker, and of course writing his own blogs, Greta has [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Using Blogs and Social Media in Undergrad Classrooms

This January, John Hawks (of his eponymous weblog) and I are moderating a session as part of the education track at Science Online in North Carolina. Blogging in the undergraduate science classroom (how to maximize the potential of course blogs) (discussion) – Jason Goldman and John Hawks This session will mainly feature a roundtable discussion [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Shareef Jackson

Welcome to my second installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may have been sleeping on. Introducing…. Shareef Jackson and ShareefJackson.com Shareef Jackson shares interesting STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) news related stories at his website/blog of the same name. He discusses science [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

#Scio14 Expanding the Dialogue on Diversity: Privilege and the Pursuit of Science

BBW do science

As I was completing my doctorate studies, I was mounting an insane amount of student debt. I needed to finish. I wanted to finish. However, working an outside job or even a teaching assistantship kept taking up mind space and time and prevented me from just getting things done. I was so financially strapped that I was [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Free live stream of 2014 AAAS Science Communication Session #AAASmtg #Scicomm

DNLee at the iPad

I will be speaking  at the 2014 Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS on Thursday, February 13. I am speaking in the Communicating Science Sessions. It includes three panels. Engaging with Journalists with Cornelia Dean (moderator) and speakers Carl Zimmer, Robert Lee Hotz, David Baron, and Paula Apsell. Engaging with [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Communicating Science in Chicago – come see me!

Students at a nature center doing hands on urban ecology observations

I will be in Chicago, Illinois, attending the American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS, meeting in Chicago February 13-17, 2014. As the largest general science conferences ever it hosts presentations and demonstrations  health, medicine, agriculture, engineering, life sciences, physical sciences, social sciences, education, mathematics, policy, and more. I will be presenting on Thursday, February 13 [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Free the News, Share the Science – Campaign to create the Sex Politics & Religion Network

20131219223945-pressclubjbey

The National Science & Technology News Service’s own Jamilah Bey has been given the opportunity to create a new online journalism forum: The Sex Politics And Religion Network. It will be an online forum and an iTunes podcast. It will be the perfect place to continue and expand many of the science, science literacy, and science [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

#NPRBlacksinTech – a conversation about African American participation in American Innovation fields

#NPRBlacksinTech Week 2

NPR Tell Me More Program with Michel Martin has been hosting an on-going conversation about the state of African-American participation in technology, as well as science and engineering field. It began with an on air radio program on November 27, 2013: A Day In The Life: Blacks At The Cutting Edge Of Innovation (Podcast of [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

#DivSciWri I need a social media intern. Are you interested?

DNLee at the iPad

My hands are full. Life and research are busy. If I learned nothing else in Dissertation Support Group, then I at least learned the importance of asking for help when you need it. I need help. I would like to take on a social media intern to help me stay on top of this little [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Sharing Science & Expanding Science Communication opportunities to Broader Audiences

DiverseScholar-Unity-vote

My name is Danielle Lee; and I share science. I’ve used that short sentence to start several of my seminar talks about science education, science communication and science outreach. For me, these three activities are heavily co-mingled. I weave in and through these arenas like an atom. It’s quite natural for me. It’s also very [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Notes from the #NABJ13 Science Journalism 101

Ivan Oransky, Global Editor Director, MedPage Today (Former Executive Editor of Reuters Health) Danielle N. Lee, Science Blogger, The Urban Scientist of The Scientific American Network Jamila Bey, Radio Show Host pg The Sex, Politics And Religion Hour: SPAR With Jamila, AM 1390 Washington, DC and AM 1430 New York City, Washington Post blog, She [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

The Tweet Recap of NABJ Science Journalism 101

nabj_orlando

The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Science Journalism Panel was great. I owe unending thanks to Jamila Bey, David Kroll, Robin Lloyd and Ivan Oransky for their generous support of this endeavor. There were about 20 people in the room – we had some stiff competition, but there were engaged people in the room…many [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Dinosaurs

Get Total Access to our Digital Anthology

1,200 Articles

Order Now - Just $39! >

X

Email this Article

X