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Posts Tagged "scicomm"

Image of the Week

Have a Heart, Kill Your Lawn

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Source: Katie McKissick’s Symbiartic post: Don’t Be a Water Jerk. Image © Katie McKissick Few things are more inviting than a flawless green turf, stretching out before you like a luscious green tumbling mat – unless, of course, that lawn is in the Southwestern United States and you are aware of the severity of the [...]

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Image of the Week

The Emerging Mosquito

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Image Credit: © Alex Wild Source: Recipe For A Photograph #4: The Emerging Mosquito, on Compound Eye As the weather warms and spring marches into summer, mosquito pupae are shedding their skins and emerging from stagnant pools to search for warm mammalian blood. The thought of swarms of pesky mosquitoes and the itchy red welts [...]

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Image of the Week

Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

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Artist: Darren Naish Source: Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on… it’s about monitor lizards, by Darren Naish on Tetrapod Zoology If you’re not a herpetologist, you may be of the mindset that lizards all look the same, but that would only expose you for what you are: a human primate, finely attuned to the faces [...]

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Image of the Week

The 500-lb. Chicken From Hell

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Source: 500-Pound “Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Once Roamed North America by Kate Wong at Observations Illustration credit: Mark Klingler, Carnegie Museum of Natural History Nothing you could find in any hen house could prepare you for the 11.5-foot tall, 500-lb. behemoth that roamed the landscape 66-million years ago in what is today North and South [...]

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Image of the Week

Tragically Beautiful

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Source: ScienceArt On View in March/April 2014 on Symbiartic Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide, and those that remain are increasingly falling victim to environmental pollutants that cause deformities such as extra limbs and ambiguous sexual organs. Brandon Ballengée’s work aims to draw attention to their plight through visually arresting [...]

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Symbiartic

New Beginnings, Old Themes and False Starts

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About a month ago, We started something new. Kalliopi Monoyios, 1/3 of the Symbiartic posse pushed Katie McKissick and myself to start working on themed creations made especially for our blog. The first theme: ‘New Beginnings”. See the introductory post to Art Takes on Science here See Kalliopi Monoyios’s New Beginnings art here See Katie [...]

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Symbiartic

Help Us Start a SciArt Tweet Storm

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In addition to being artists ourselves, the Symbiartic team hopes to help advance the presence of images in science communication and culture. To that end, we would like to invite people making science-related art of all kinds to participate in an event from March 1-7 : the 1st SciArt Tweet Storm. Starting today, right now, let’s [...]

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Symbiartic

What Can We Learn From Renaissance Vegetables?

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Just throwing this out there. Has there been an attempt to track the meandering flow of selective breeding of fruits, vegetables and flowers by using still life paintings since the Renaissance? Are any vegetables significantly different in say, these face illusions by Giuseppe Arcimboldo (~1526-1593) than they would appear now? According to the Carrot Museum, [...]

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Symbiartic

Three Artists Tackle the Same Science: An Experiment in ScienceArt & Blogging

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This July, Symbiartic will celebrate its 4th birthday along with the entire Scientific American Blog Network. To date, we have featured more than 230 science artists in over 460 posts as the field continues to expand and come into its own. Featuring other peoples’ work and being a part of this burgeoning field has been [...]

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Symbiartic

A Farewell to Peers

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The Symbiartic team (Katie McKissick, Glendon Mellow, Kalliopi Monoyios) are sad to say farewell to the blogs and their bloggers that left the Scientific American blog network earlier this month. If you missed the announcement, the SciAm Blog Network has been pruned and is taking on a new shape. Many of the blogs have chosen [...]

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Symbiartic

A Photographic Survey of the American Yard

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Though it’s tempting to think you must spend thousands of dollars on equipment to take great photographs, Joshua White is helping prove that the best camera is the one you have on you when the inspiration strikes. His series, titled “A Photographic Survey of the American Yard,” is taken entirely with his iPhone and is [...]

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Symbiartic

10 Original Gifts for Science (and SciArt) Geeks

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It’s time again for me to offer up a few quirky gift ideas for the science enthusiasts in your life. I guarantee these will be the most original gifts under the tree! And the best part? Many are under $50. Squee! 10. Periodic Table Cutting Board by Elysium Woodworks, $45 on Etsy.com 9. Embroidered Anatomy [...]

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Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

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For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

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Symbiartic

Portraits of Bonsai at the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens

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As I write this, the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens is preparing an exhibit showcasing the work of Dick Rauh, a botanical illustrator who has distinguished himself as a master of botanical illustration since he picked up a pen and paper in his retirement. In a show called “Patience, Paper, Pen and Brush,” the Gardens will be [...]

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Symbiartic

In Case You’re Tempted to Think 3D Modeling All Looks the Same

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I initially contacted Bryan Christie to request permission to feature his spectacular cheetah illustration in this year’s blitz. He agreed, and so here it is, in all its glory: But he also tipped me off to his fine art work that is equally worthy of note: How could two such disparate styles emanate from the [...]

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