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Posts Tagged "sciart"

Image of the Week

The 500-lb. Chicken From Hell

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Source: 500-Pound “Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Once Roamed North America by Kate Wong at Observations Illustration credit: Mark Klingler, Carnegie Museum of Natural History Nothing you could find in any hen house could prepare you for the 11.5-foot tall, 500-lb. behemoth that roamed the landscape 66-million years ago in what is today North and South [...]

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Image of the Week

Tragically Beautiful

DFA186: Hadēs by Brandon Ballengée

Source: ScienceArt On View in March/April 2014 on Symbiartic Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide, and those that remain are increasingly falling victim to environmental pollutants that cause deformities such as extra limbs and ambiguous sexual organs. Brandon Ballengée’s work aims to draw attention to their plight through visually arresting [...]

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The Ocelloid

An ink dinoflagellate

Things have been a little tense lately… here, have a dinoflagellate! (kinda looks like a space ship, no?) This ink drawing is based on Protoperidium, a dinoflagellate notable for its ‘pallium feeding‘: upon finding something tasty but awkwardly-shaped, it extrudes a ‘feeding veil’ in the form of a pseudopod-like structure, which then envelops the prey [...]

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The Ocelloid

Drawing trilobites, and the life of Midwestern coral reefs

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Yes, Indiana has coral reefs. More on that in a bit. A couple days ago I entered a trilobite doodling spree, and have come up with a sort of technique for drawing them. Their diversity is astounding, but this is the basic body plan, which gets tinkered by the different species. Haven’t figured out how [...]

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The Ocelloid

Protist-y art continued: the protist zodiac

One night, when I was definitely completely sober in every way possible (of course!), it struck me that while both the European and Chinese zodiacs (ones I’m familiar with) display a nice variety of animals with and without backbones (I happen to be spineless according to the European one, and scaly and flame-breathing according to [...]

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The Ocelloid

Some protist-y art

For me, the second more relaxing activity after microscopy is vector art. And then regular art. (This excludes non-activities, such as napping in the sun, and staring at life passing by. That’s all I’d do if one didn’t have to work — watch things.) Since I’m not often creative with my subject matter, the art [...]

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Symbiartic

Just How Fishy Are You? More About Your Inner Animal

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Last night the final episode of the 3-part series of PBS’s adaptation of Neil Shubin’s book Your Inner Fish aired in most of the country (although some PBS stations have delayed the last episode until next week… If you didn’t catch the series, you can stream them online for a short period here.) If tweets [...]

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Symbiartic

Reconstructing an Ancient Fin and Watching it Paddle to Fame

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Friends and colleagues who know that I illustrated Neil Shubin’s first book, Your Inner Fish, have been asking if I was involved in the three-part PBS series hosted by Shubin that will air next week on April 9th. The short answer is no. But I’m proud to say that I made this very model of [...]

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Symbiartic

12 Things I’ve Learned About Being a Science Artist Online

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After celebrating 7 years of blogging on The Flying Trilobite, I’m going to get all old guard and pompous and established and drop some wisdom about best practices for science artists online. Show off. Saying “I am too busy making art to spend time online” means you are too busy making art no one will [...]

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Symbiartic

‘Cosmos’ and ‘Your Inner Fish’ Pack the 1-2 Punch

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Two weeks from today, on April 9th, PBS will air the first of a three-part series adapted from Neil Shubin’s popular book, Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year-History of the Human Body. If you’ve ever wondered why we’re built the way we are – with five fingers on each hand, testes that hang [...]

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Symbiartic

What If All The Images Went Away

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Last week on Twitter and Facebook, I leveled criticisms at particular sites and railed against improper image use in science communication. Again. After arguing with (arguably) allies in science communication I was fed up. Fed up with the attitude that unattributed images are just a (small) sacrifice for the net good of science communication to [...]

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Symbiartic

Snake vs. Croc in Real and Hyper-Real Versions

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When illustrators embark upon a new illustration, hours of research and work go into constructing a scene that is believable, powerful, and informative. In 2009, when James Gurney was tasked with reconstructing Titanoboa, the largest snake that ever lived, his first priority was conveying the sheer size of a 48-foot long, 2500-lb. beast. Ultimately, he [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt on View in March/April 2014

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A fresh batch of exhibits combining science and art are going up around the country, plus, there’s still time to catch some of the longer running exhibits that go through the middle of 2014. From John J. Audubon to dark matter to hybrid bodies created with modern transplant technology, there’s something in here for everyone. [...]

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Symbiartic

The Most Fascinating Image You Can See On LinkedIn

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Nothing can say”Amazing art!” the way an intricate web with your own name in the center can. I am glorious. LinkedIn launched a feature called InMaps back in 2011 and they produce visually arresting, zoomable depictions of your network. Over the last 6 or 7 years, I’ve developed my LinkedIn network in a mostly casual [...]

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Symbiartic

20th-Century Math Hidden in 15th-Century Art

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Art and science are often thought of as disparate entities, drawing on different strengths and different ways of thinking. This is surely true, but the disciplines also share patterns of thought and essential characteristics. Take, for example, their inherently collaborative processes. No artist creates in a vacuum just as no scientists could perform the work [...]

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Symbiartic

Tools Change But Creative People Are a Constant

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Once upon a time, I wrote about five reasons your camera won’t steal my job. In short, the reasons were: 1. Photography can’t capture small things 2. Photography can’t capture distant things 3. Photography can’t capture extinct things 4. Photography can emphasize the wrong things 5. Photography is just one tool of many to master [...]

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