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Posts Tagged "sciart"

Image of the Week

A Genome is Not a Blueprint

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Image: 1936 Joy Oil gas station blueprints (top); sequence from human chromosome 1 (bottom). Source: from A Monkey’s Blueprint by Martin Krzywinski on SA Visual When artist Martin Krzywinski was challenged to come up with a graphic that quickly and concisely shows how the human genome is more similar to chimpanzee and bonobo genomes than [...]

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Image of the Week

Guinness-Busting Bug

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Credit: China News Service/Zhong Xin Source: Bec Crew’s Largest aquatic insect in the world found in China on Running Ponies Remember the Guinness Book of World Records? Pouring over the pages of tiny text and black and white images of record breakers was a hallowed summer time-busting tradition, at least in my circle of friends. [...]

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Image of the Week

Have a Heart, Kill Your Lawn

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Source: Katie McKissick’s Symbiartic post: Don’t Be a Water Jerk. Image © Katie McKissick Few things are more inviting than a flawless green turf, stretching out before you like a luscious green tumbling mat – unless, of course, that lawn is in the Southwestern United States and you are aware of the severity of the [...]

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Image of the Week

The Emerging Mosquito

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Image Credit: © Alex Wild Source: Recipe For A Photograph #4: The Emerging Mosquito, on Compound Eye As the weather warms and spring marches into summer, mosquito pupae are shedding their skins and emerging from stagnant pools to search for warm mammalian blood. The thought of swarms of pesky mosquitoes and the itchy red welts [...]

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Image of the Week

Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

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Artist: Darren Naish Source: Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on… it’s about monitor lizards, by Darren Naish on Tetrapod Zoology If you’re not a herpetologist, you may be of the mindset that lizards all look the same, but that would only expose you for what you are: a human primate, finely attuned to the faces [...]

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Image of the Week

The 500-lb. Chicken From Hell

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Source: 500-Pound “Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Once Roamed North America by Kate Wong at Observations Illustration credit: Mark Klingler, Carnegie Museum of Natural History Nothing you could find in any hen house could prepare you for the 11.5-foot tall, 500-lb. behemoth that roamed the landscape 66-million years ago in what is today North and South [...]

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Image of the Week

Tragically Beautiful

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Source: ScienceArt On View in March/April 2014 on Symbiartic Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide, and those that remain are increasingly falling victim to environmental pollutants that cause deformities such as extra limbs and ambiguous sexual organs. Brandon Ballengée’s work aims to draw attention to their plight through visually arresting [...]

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The Ocelloid

An ink dinoflagellate

Things have been a little tense lately… here, have a dinoflagellate! (kinda looks like a space ship, no?) This ink drawing is based on Protoperidium, a dinoflagellate notable for its ‘pallium feeding‘: upon finding something tasty but awkwardly-shaped, it extrudes a ‘feeding veil’ in the form of a pseudopod-like structure, which then envelops the prey [...]

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The Ocelloid

Drawing trilobites, and the life of Midwestern coral reefs

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Yes, Indiana has coral reefs. More on that in a bit. A couple days ago I entered a trilobite doodling spree, and have come up with a sort of technique for drawing them. Their diversity is astounding, but this is the basic body plan, which gets tinkered by the different species. Haven’t figured out how [...]

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The Ocelloid

Protist-y art continued: the protist zodiac

One night, when I was definitely completely sober in every way possible (of course!), it struck me that while both the European and Chinese zodiacs (ones I’m familiar with) display a nice variety of animals with and without backbones (I happen to be spineless according to the European one, and scaly and flame-breathing according to [...]

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The Ocelloid

Some protist-y art

For me, the second more relaxing activity after microscopy is vector art. And then regular art. (This excludes non-activities, such as napping in the sun, and staring at life passing by. That’s all I’d do if one didn’t have to work — watch things.) Since I’m not often creative with my subject matter, the art [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond

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The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as [...]

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Symbiartic

SciArt Destinations: The Paleolithic Caves of Cantabria, Spain

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Think of the last time you were in the presence of something really old. Was it a cherished possession of one of your family members? Was it a used book or antique that spoke to you from a dusty hole-in-the-wall shop? Think of your impulse to handle it and let your mind wander to the [...]

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Symbiartic

The Marvelous Flying Sauropods of Puttapipat

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There are two kinds of illustrators. Those, like myself who bend fine art and other forms into the service of illustration – and then there are illustrators like Niroot Puttapipat (a.k.a. Himmapaan) who follow in the rich tradition of book illustrators like Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac. In the handling of his art materials and [...]

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Symbiartic

Essential Social Media Sites for Science Illustrators

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During my recent talk at the AMI conference about social media and illustration, I skimmed this slide near the end. Talks were intended to be 20 minutes long and I don’t like to rehearse too much: I don’t read off of my slides so I tend to remind myself of the critical points and fret [...]

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Symbiartic

Science on a Sphere & Falling in Love Again

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This week, the only dedicated science illustration conference in the country is taking place in Boulder, CO. The Guild of Natural Science Illustrators’ annual gathering is in full swing and there are fascinating developments to convey. First off, on Monday the keynote speakers addressed two sides of the same question: how can we engage more [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Heat Up This Summer

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Take a break from the heat this summer to step into some cool galleries exhibiting scienceart. If the exhibits keep pouring in at this rate, I’ll have to split up this post by region. There are five scienceart exhibits in New York alone! But for those of you who are not in the NY-region, don’t [...]

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Symbiartic

Do Our Descendants Have the Right to Spy On Us?

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Do our unborn descendants have a right to spy on our day-to-day activities? There’s little doubt they will look through our digital archive, minus some terrible technological disaster. How about watching us from weeds at the little corners of the street, from holes in the cement, from our eavestroughs? Jonathon Keats is at it again. [...]

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Symbiartic

Making the Ugly World of Medical Illustration Online Pretty Again

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Shortly after my Symbiartic co-blogger Kalliopi has run a workshop about social media for nature & science artists at the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators annual conference in July, I will be speaking about social media for medical illustrators and communicators at the Association of Medical Illustrators annual conference at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, [...]

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Symbiartic

Learning the Art of Science Illustration

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If you’ve ever wondered what it would take to combine your love of science and art, there is a conference on the horizon that might just be the inspiration you’ve been waiting for. This summer in Boulder, CO, the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators is hosting its annual conference and it is not to be [...]

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Symbiartic

Can Machines Produce Art that Moves Us?

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This happens more often than you’d think: You tell someone you are an illustrator. They ask you a few questions and then get to what’s really on their mind: “So, do you do all your work on the computer or do you draw everything by hand?” When you respond that you do some (or all) [...]

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