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Posts Tagged "Pinch of Pigment"

Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Ultramarine

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The Virgin in Prayer, 1640-50, by Sassoferrato. National Gallery, UK. When I write these Pinch of Pigment posts, alternate, catchier titles come to mind. This one could be called “Why Blue is a Girl’s Colour” or “The Economics of Symbols”. Ultramarine Blue is one of the most important pigments in Western fine art history. And [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Quinacradone Burnt Orange

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The first time I had ever heard of Quinacradone Burnt Orange (C20H12N2O2) was after starting to work for an art supply company, DeSerres, that I worked for for the next 10 years. That was also when I first started becoming fascinated by pigments. A number of the staff were excited about trying different pigments, and [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Cobalt Blue

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Cobalt Blue is a fascinating colour with a much longer history than many pigments in use today. It’s also the only goblin hiding in the Periodic Table. Cobalt, is symbol Co on the periodic table with an atomic weight of 27. While in it’s natural, raw state it’s a somewhat burnished silver colour, it is [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Mummy Brown

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Many of the early Pre-Raphaelite paintings may have paint made from dead Egyptians. Considered to be a highly variable pigment between raw umber (almost greenish brown) and burnt umber (a ruddier brown), Mummy Brown was a transparent brown good for mixing. And it was appalling. Made from ancient Egyptian human and feline mummies grave-robbed investigated [...]

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