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Posts Tagged "mural"

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Who Illustrates the Murals at Museums?

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Have you ever wondered who illustrates the murals at our beloved museums, zoos, aquariums, and botanical gardens? Marjorie Leggitt is one such person. Based in Boulder, CO, she has spent her career illuminating science and natural processes through her art. This mural was made for the Denver Botanical Gardens in Denver, CO to illustrate the [...]

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Symbiartic

Look into the Eyes: paleoart by Stevie Moore

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I think it’s the eyes. There is a lot of paleoart out there, and we feature a lot of it here on Symbiartic. Something about dinosaurs attracts some of the very best nature and science illustrators out there. I suspect some kind of love of science plus childhood nostalgia drives all of the dinophilia images [...]

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Physics Hasn’t Looked This Hot Since The Big Bang

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The ATLAS detector at CERN is overwhelming to mere mortals like myself. It’s one of four detectors along the Large Hadron Collider designed to detect the most fundamental particles in our universe. It sits in a cave 92 meters below ground, is over 45 meters long and weighs a mere 7000 metric tons (that’s equivalent [...]

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Symbiartic

You Had Me At Hydrothermal Vent Worms

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There’s an interesting show going on currently in Denver, CO’s Anthology Fine Art Gallery that’s worth a special trip if you’re into sciart. Patrick Maxcy is a painter, illustrator, and muralist who is fascinated by the natural world. His exhibit, titled Running Wild, showcases his back-to-the-basics drawing chops and his flair for telling compelling stories. [...]

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Symbiartic

SciArt of the Day: Arach-attack!

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Marlin Peterson’s spectacular trompe l’oeil of two opiliones (commonly known as daddy long legs) atop Seattle’s Armory is bound to give arachnophobes a run for their money. Trompe l’oeil (literally “trick the eye”) is a classic mural technique that is used to create the illusion of a three-dimensional object on a flat surface. Because of [...]

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