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"germany"25 articles archived since 1845

The Zeppelin Earns a Fearsome Reputation, 1915

The Zeppelin Earns a Fearsome Reputation, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 27, 1915 Airships with rigid frames were developed by Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin of Germany starting in the late 19th century.

March 27, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

The Big Guns, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 6, 1915 World War I was an artillery war. Even as new technology—tanks, airplanes, submarines and poison gas—changed the nature of fighting, it was the power of mass manufacturing that had the most profound effect on the conduct of war.

March 6, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Lawrence in Arabia: from Archaeologist to Spy, 1914

Lawrence in Arabia: from Archaeologist to Spy, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 12, 1914 Here's a short, cryptic note from our December 12, 1914, issue, about scientific work being carried out in the Middle East: "Survey of Southern Palestine.—A considerable amount of surveying and exploration has recently been done along the southern frontier of Palestine under [...]

December 12, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Will Germany really phase out nuclear by 2021?

Will Germany really phase out nuclear by 2021?

Germany’s electricity mix is rapidly changing, with renewables on the way in and nuclear (potentially) heading out. But, given nationwide concerns regarding energy affordability and fairness, the future remains unclear.

March 16, 2014 — Melissa C. Lott
Renewable Energy Shines in 2014

Renewable Energy Shines in 2014

Looking back at 2014 through the prism of renewable energy, it's hard not to get bombastic. So many records were broken, corners turned, and with costs declining, it's hard not to wonder if 2015 will see renewable energy become nothing more than a fully competitive energy source, capturing more and more market share.

February 5, 2015 — Tali Trigg
First Sea Battle of World War I

First Sea Battle of World War I

Reported in Scientific American this Week in World War I: September 12, 1914 The Battle of Heligoland Bight took place in the North Sea on August 28, 1914.

September 12, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Photo Friday: Energy on the horizon, A foggy German morning

Photo Friday: Energy on the horizon, A foggy German morning

This photo shows the town of Emmerich, Germany at sunrise. Taken by Denmark’s Dave Heuts in 2009, this landscape shows not only the morning fog, but also a peak at Germany’s energy infrastructure.

September 20, 2013 — Melissa C. Lott

Data show that Germany's grid is one of the world's most reliable

As the share of enewables in Germany's electricity mix approaches 30%, the country's power grid appears to be going strong. According to data released Friday by the Bundesnetzagentur (Germany's grid regulator), the country's power grid remained one of the world's most reliable in 2013.

September 16, 2014 — Melissa C. Lott

Battle of Gallipoli: A Strategic View, 1915

Scientific American looked at the wider context of the battle for Gallipoli. This Week in World War I: April 24, 1915 April 25, 2015, marks the 100-year anniversary of an important battle in the First World War: it was a major defeat for the Allies (Britain, France and Russia) and a great victory for the [...]

April 24, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
X-Rays at War, 1915

X-Rays at War, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 30, 1915 X-rays were used for medical operations within a couple of months after they were discovered by Wilhelm Roentgen in late 1895.

January 30, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

X-Rays at War, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 30, 1915 X-rays were used for medical operations within a couple of months after they were discovered by Wilhelm Roentgen in late 1895.

January 30, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Sinking the Lusitania, Part 2: Death and Blame, May 7, 1915

Reports and opinions in Scientific American on a key tragedy in World War I May 8, 2015 When the German submarine U-20 torpedoed the British civilian ship Lusitania on May 7, 1915, the grand ocean liner sank in only 18 minutes.

May 7, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Fighting Zeppelins with Airplanes, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: June 26, 1915After the First World War broke out, airships quickly became a scourge. German Zeppelins bombed Liège and Antwerp in Belgium and perhaps hastened the fall of those two cities even though there were few casualties (as we understand such things in our more dismal era).

June 26, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Women and the War, 1915

Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: July 3, 1915By July 1915 the war had been going on for almost a year. German mobilization had proved to be highly effective at ensuring a steady supply of young, healthy men for duties in the army.

July 3, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff