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Posts Tagged "art and science"

The Artful Amoeba

Mysterious Tiles from a Time When Art and Science Were Friends

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Forces in society of late have lots of us longing for the days of the Enlightenment, smallpox, powdered wigs, ridiculously uncomfortable clothing and all. It must have been nice to live in an era when science and scientists were respected, admired, and generously funded (though often by self-funded aristocrats or by royal grants gleaned from [...]

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Guest Blog

#WSF11: The Invisible Language of Smell

When attending events, like scientific conferences, some people take copious notes with pen and paper. More and more people live-blog or live-tweet such events. But some people do something different – they live-draw the events. Perrin Ireland is an artist who does this – turning the words, sounds, sights and smells of the event into [...]

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Guest Blog

Dressing the meat of tomorrow

If you take a small sample of animal tissue and encourage it to grow in vitro, separate from the original animal’s body, it is possible to create an edible piece of meat. Culturing living tissue is a routine lab procedure and an important part of medical and biological research, but using the tools and techniques [...]

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Image of the Week

A Mitey Claw

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If the key to happiness is appreciating the little things in life, then take a moment to appreciate the claw of a microscopic mite only 600 µm long. It’s from a new species discovered in the soil of a chestnut plantation where they use their nubbles and knobs (technically known as palettes) to “swim” through [...]

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Image of the Week

The 500-lb. Chicken From Hell

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Source: 500-Pound “Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Once Roamed North America by Kate Wong at Observations Illustration credit: Mark Klingler, Carnegie Museum of Natural History Nothing you could find in any hen house could prepare you for the 11.5-foot tall, 500-lb. behemoth that roamed the landscape 66-million years ago in what is today North and South [...]

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Image of the Week

Tragically Beautiful

DFA186: Hadēs by Brandon Ballengée

Source: ScienceArt On View in March/April 2014 on Symbiartic Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide, and those that remain are increasingly falling victim to environmental pollutants that cause deformities such as extra limbs and ambiguous sexual organs. Brandon Ballengée’s work aims to draw attention to their plight through visually arresting [...]

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Life, Unbounded

Tweets In Space!

Tweets In Space (N. Stern and S. Kildall)

When the interplanetary missions Pioneer 10 and 11 launched in the late 1970s they each carried a metal plaque engraved with a set of pictorial messages from humanity. Eventually these extraordinary probes will traverse interstellar space, carrying these hopeful symbols towards anyone, or anything, that might one day find them. A few years later also [...]

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Observations

X-rays blow up secret to van Gogh’s fading sunflowers [Video]

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The umber tinge accenting the tips of many of Vincent van Gogh‘s famous sunflowers has vexed conservators and chemists alike, who know that this hue was not what the artist had first daubed on his canvases. Now, after subjecting several samples of 19th-century paints to finely tuned x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) [...]

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Symbiartic

20th-Century Math Hidden in 15th-Century Art

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Art and science are often thought of as disparate entities, drawing on different strengths and different ways of thinking. This is surely true, but the disciplines also share patterns of thought and essential characteristics. Take, for example, their inherently collaborative processes. No artist creates in a vacuum just as no scientists could perform the work [...]

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Symbiartic

The Three Little Pigs Never Thought of This Building Material

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Bricks, sticks, and hay are decidedly pedestrian building materials in comparison to a new building that just opened to the public last Thursday in Hamburg, Germany. Ambitious architects have built an apartment covered in a thin layer of living, breathing algae. The building, known as BIQ (for Bio Intelligent Quotient), meets the extremely stringent passive-house [...]

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