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"animation"12 articles archived since 1845

Scatter, Adapt, and Remember

Scatter, Adapt, and Remember

“If you think Humans are destroying the planet in a way that’s historically unprecedented, you’re suffering from a species-level delusions of grandeur.” -Annalee Newitz, Scatter Adapt, and Remember Perhaps it’s having a 3 month old baby in the house (our second), but I’ve been thinking about the apocalypse more than normal.

April 30, 2014 — Glendon Mellow

One Photon's Journey: Saul Perlmutter

This is the story of the evolution of life on earth during one photon’s journey across the universe. Told by Saul Perlmutter who shared the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe.

October 14, 2015 — Nature Video
Strangely Beautiful Sneeze Spray

Strangely Beautiful Sneeze Spray

With cold and flu season upon us and cooler weather increasingly pushing us indoors, it’s time to remind ourselves how to stay healthy.

September 23, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Science on a Sphere & Falling in Love Again

Science on a Sphere & Falling in Love Again

This week, the only dedicated science illustration conference in the country is taking place in Boulder, CO. The Guild of Natural Science Illustrators’ annual gathering is in full swing and there are fascinating developments to convey.

July 16, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Good Microbes Make Good Pets

THIS is good scicomm. Why? Well, for many reasons – good writing, good sound, good editing – but by far the most apparent, the reason most people will sit up and take note is because of the strong visuals.

November 25, 2013 — Kalliopi Monoyios

A Fleeting Molecular Kiss

Best viewed at 1080p In addition to creating science-art and blogging here on Symbiartic, I work at INVIVO Communications in QA and social media. One of the absolute treats in my day to day job is getting to watch gorgeous 3D animation about health, pharmaceutical mechanisms of action and medical devices.

April 28, 2014 — Glendon Mellow

The Pigeon, the Antenna and Me: Robert Wilson

Radioastronomer Robert Wilson recalls a pair of pigeons who almost thwarted the discovery of cosmic background radiation. Wilson’s discovery—“the echo of the big bang”—earned him a share of the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physics.

October 21, 2015 — Nature Video

Breathe Deep, Fellow Asthmatics

Today is World Asthma Day. Started by the Global Initiative for Asthma, I thought World Asthma Day would be a great time to share a detail from a series of key frames being produced by the animation team at INVIVO Communications, where I work.

May 5, 2015 — Glendon Mellow
A Wondrous Look Inside a Tuft of Grass

A Wondrous Look Inside a Tuft of Grass

500 years ago, artist and engraver Albrecht Dürer took the time to carefully and meticulously paint the >Great Piece of Turf. In both the Northern and Southern European Renaissance, studies in preparation of a larger painting were not uncommon.

September 14, 2014 — Glendon Mellow

What Is the Uncanny Valley? [Video]

Lifelike robots and animations can elicit a response that’s somewhere between uncomfortable and creeped out. Scientific American editor Larry Greenemeier explains why in our latest Instant Egghead video: More to explore: What Should a Robot Look Like?

October 28, 2013 — Joss Fong

Attribution is Catchy

Credit is Due (The Attribution Song) by Question Copyright and artist-in-residence Nina Paley with Bliss Blood on vocals. By pairing an important message with a catchy tune, the point sticks with you far longer than a © symbol will.

March 30, 2014 — Glendon Mellow