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Symbiartic

Symbiartic

The art of science and the science of art.

Symbiartic’s September SciArt Blitz!

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Since Symbiartic began here on the Scientific American Blog Network a little over two years ago, we've been sharing the view from the rich intersection of science and art (at the corner of micro and macro) and helped connect image-makers around the razor edge of of the #SciArt world.

We're a well-rounded, well-published group:

  • Kalliopi Monoyios, scientific illustrator, original artist for Tiktaalik, once ripped off by South Park
  • Glendon Mellow, fine artist who sticks wings on extinct aquatic animals, designer of scientist tattoos
  • Katie McKissick, a.k.a. Beatrice the Biologist, cartoonist, documenter of amoeba affection

Kalliopi, Katie and myself have brought hundreds of images and celebrated their makers. But it's not enough. There's so much out there. That's why last September on Symbiartic we did the SciArt of the Day - to bring more to you, to feel like we were catching up on all the great work out there, even if only a little bit.

This year we're going bigger!

Welcome to the September SciArt Blitz! More SciArt every day all month!

Let's start the Blitz off with a heavy dose of artistic hubris: some of the original concept images for the Symbiartic banner.

The original Symbiartic banner concept. © Symbiartic

A little to wacky? Perhaps.

These concepts were pretty early, before we knew the blog layout. So we had unnecessary text.

Of course! The Mona Lisa.

A skeleton!

The Mona Lisa and skeleton. The only logical progression.

The original avatar of beauty, the Venus of Willendorf.

Our final banner, in Deluxe, oversized Technicolor™.

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On this day last year:

We started our SciArt September with Earth's Pulse by Kathryn Brimblecomb-Fox. Here's a peek.

Earth's Pulse © Kathryn Brimblecomb-Fox.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click the image to see the whole painting and post.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

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