ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network













Symbiartic

Symbiartic


The art of science and the science of art.
Symbiartic HomeAboutContact

Science-Art Scumble #31

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


Email   PrintPrint



The Science-Art Scumble is a post full of links, and some stunning art. Click here for recent Scumbles and  here for even earlier Scumbles.

Featured Art by Daniel Brown of Laughing Mantis Studio:

Ocean Invasion #12: "We've Got Crabs" © Daniel D. Brown

Part of digital artist and cell biologist Daniel DeWitt Brown‘s Ocean Invasion series, when I saw Daniel post this stunner, I immediately asked if we could feature it for this Scumble. Blending realism with a legitimate sense of whimsy and camp, Brown’s whole series makes you wish the denizens of the deep became the newest invasive species on land and in our cities.

Make sure to check out Daniel D. Brown’s work at the links:

 

Now for the science-art scumble!
- -
Circulatory System Body Art as Promotion for Blood Donation – Laughing Squid

Cc: me by Elaine Whittaker – Redhead Gallery

Galaxy Garden by Jon Lomberg visited by students (video) – PBS Hawaii

Biomedical Picture of the Day – new site launched, hat tip to Anthony Lewis.

What’s Your Lens on Nature? – Lisa Gardiner, Spark Blog

Dragon Breeder Beta begins! – Spongelab

Giant Whale Spotted in Argentinian Forest – My Modern Met, hat tip to Tommy Leung.

New breakthroughs in computer graphics – Gurney Journey

Better Blogging for the Artist/Entrepreneur – Artist Mommy

Always a helpful review of biomimicry – Hybrids of Art and Science

Get Ready to Celebrate 300 Years of Botanical Art – ArtPlantae Today

Whales have a sensory organ unlike anything we’ve ever seen – io9, featuring kick-ass illustrations by Carl Buell.

Painting with Microbes – Mad Art Lab

The Dan Varner Tribute Gallery – ART Evolved, massive paleo-art gallery in tribute to a great artist.

Goldilocks Planets Captured in Glass – Rebecca Hill, CultureLab

Super-Heroes – Art @ Kathryn Brimblecombe-Fox

Trish Murphy in Colour Pencil Society Exhibit – SONSI

The Regularly Scheduled Bonus Comic – Sci-ence Comics

Dragon Eggs – Walkabout. Make sure to regularly check this amazing naturalist diary blog by Emily Coren.

BONE – Anatomy Illustrated – Street Anatomy

Kristian Hammerstad - Fresh Photons

New illustrations: Zoo Animals – News from the Studio by Emily S. Damstra

Selected for a Big Project – Heather Ward Wildlife Art

Hybrid Flying Trilobite – The Flying Trilobite

Dinosaurs In Ink - Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs

More Dinosaurs in Comics! – Carnosauria with Brett Booth

The Great Dying – Julio Lacerda

Like a Deer Fly in the Headlights – Biodiversity in Focus

DNA Human Being – GabrielGrob

Penguin Poo Illustration: investigation of biophysics, or fecal humor? – Biocreativity

Elizabeth Turk’s marble sculpture – Bioephemera

Sketching Solitude – Karen’s Nature Art

Lori Dunn in Animal Artists Exhibit – SONSI

Dinosaur Art Auction – Blacknick Sculpture

Organs and Organisms – David Earl Crooks

Albasaurus: The World’s First Day-Glo Velocirabbit – Science to the Power of Art

- – -

Scumble:  ”A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through.”

From  The Artist’s Handbook, by Ray Smith.


This began as a series of posts on my personal blog, The Flying Trilobite, as a way to brush highlights over the tremendous amount of science-based art that’s out there. I can’t begin to cover it all, so here’s a scumble over some recent posts that I found interesting, provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the  Science Artists Feed, and other sources.

Science-art is becoming an increasingly popular form of science communication and entertainment. Drawing from fine art, laboratory work, scientific illustration, concept art and more, watch how artists spread scientific literacy and play with the inspiring concepts in science.  Doing the Scumble posts, I hope to connect artists with each other, and expose their work to a wider audience.  Remember, a lot of these artists are available for commissions and have online shops for original art and reproductions.

Put your feet up, make yourself a cappuccino and enjoy the science-art on the links above.

Glendon Mellow About the Author: Glendon Mellow is a fine artist, illustrator and tattoo designer working in oil and digital media based in Toronto, Canada. He tweets @FlyingTrilobite. You can see Glendon's work-in-progress at The Flying Trilobite blog and portfolio at www.glendonmellow.com. Follow on Twitter @symbiartic.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





Rights & Permissions

Comments 1 Comment

Add Comment
  1. 1. LaughingMantis 12:58 pm 05/29/2012

    Thank you so much for featuring my work, Glendon. And now I get to spend the next long while pouring through this excellent collection of links.

    Link to this

Add a Comment
You must sign in or register as a ScientificAmerican.com member to submit a comment.

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Special Universe

Get the latest Special Collector's edition

Secrets of the Universe: Past, Present, Future

Order Now >

X

Email this Article

X