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Posts Tagged "robotics"

@ScientificAmerican

Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2015

What innovations are leaping out of the labs to shape the world in powerful ways? Identifying those compelling innovations is the charge of the Meta-Council on Emerging Technologies, one of the World Economic Forum’s network of expert communities that form the Global Agenda Councils, which today released its Top 10 List of Emerging Technologies for [...]

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Budding Scientist

Hot Bots: How Arduino Teaches Kids the Science behind Modern Gizmos

Guest post by Michael R. Duffey There is a wide variety of creative projects which can help introduce children to the world of microcontrollers.  A microcontroller is simply a small computer that can interact with the outside world.  It can connect different types of “inputs” (such as sensing a motion, force, or temperature change) to [...]

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Observations

Solar-Powered Ford Aims to Drive Off-Grid

Ford,solar,CES,auto

Solar-powered cars have been little more than a novelty to date, experimental vehicles resembling photovoltaic-laden surfboards designed mostly for racing across deserts. Expensive batteries, relatively inefficient PV energy conversion and the lack of intense sunlight in many places have made sun-powered passenger vehicles impractical. Ford is looking to change that with a version of its [...]

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Observations

What Is the Uncanny Valley? [Video]

uncanny valley chart

Lifelike robots and animations can elicit a response that’s somewhere between uncomfortable and creeped out. Scientific American editor Larry Greenemeier explains why in our latest Instant Egghead video: More to explore: What Should a Robot Look Like? (Scientific American) Is the Uncanny Valley Real? (BBC Future) Translation of Masahiro Mori’s 1970 paper (IEEE Spectrum) – [...]

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Talking back

Action Plan: Making Brain-Controlled Prosthetics That Can Open a Clothespin

Last year a group of researchers at Brown and Harvard universities reported on a study called Braingate, in which a paralyzed woman picked up a container of coffee with a robotic arm and drank from it through a straw, an action directed by electrical signals from her motor cortex. Brain-controlled interfaces have advanced dramatically during [...]

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