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"music"23 articles archived since 1845

Brief Musical Interlude (Or, Bias)

Let’s talk about bias for a minute. My fiance, Rachel Rynick, just released her first album, and I think it’s awesome. Of course, my opinion on this matter can’t really be trusted.

January 16, 2014 — Kevin Bonham
The Ancient Marriage between Music, Movement and Mood

The Ancient Marriage between Music, Movement and Mood

Think back to that moment when you first heard your favorite song. What about it made you stop in your tracks? Was it the incessant buildup, soaring high, filling you with a sense of elation?

November 18, 2013 — Shelly Fan

Genetic Memory: How We Know Things We Never Learned

I met my first savant 52 years ago and have been intrigued with that remarkable condition ever since. One of the most striking and consistent things in the many savants I have seen is that that they clearly know things they never learned.

January 28, 2015 — Darold Treffert
Music Steeped in the Wilds of Canada

Music Steeped in the Wilds of Canada

Eighteen years ago this July, a group of 14 adventurers unloaded tents, gear, food, canoes, and two guitars from the back of a big old bus and loaded them into 7 canoes in a nondescript boat launch outside of Yellowknife, NWT.

April 25, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
The Mind of the Prodigy

The Mind of the Prodigy

Prodigies dazzle us with their virtuoso violin concertos, seemingly prescient chess moves, and vivid paintings. While their work would be enough to impress us if they were 40, prodigies typically reach adult levels of performance in non-verbal, rule-based domains such as chess, art, and music before the age of 10.

February 10, 2014 — Scott Barry Kaufman

Rhythm Is Heard Best in the Bass

Better detection by the brain could explain why low-pitched notes carry the beat across musical cultures

July 5, 2014 — Philip Ball and Nature magazine
A Capella Science–Bohemian Gravity

A Capella Science–Bohemian Gravity

Who has not caught themselves singing along to Queen’s number one hit “Bohemian Rhapsody”? Perhaps we’ve made up words when we didn’t know them!

September 18, 2013 — Joanne Manaster

The Sound (And Taste) Of Music

It's said that a person can have good taste in music but what about the taste of music? What would it taste like? Experimental psychologist Charles Spence and researchers at the Crossmodal Research Laboratory at the University of Oxford may be able to provide some insight.

December 9, 2014 — Layla Eplett
The IgNobels, 2013! Playing opera to your mice.

The IgNobels, 2013! Playing opera to your mice.

I have to say that the winners of this IgNobel won in my heart PURELY because of the costumes they wore to the ceremony. Yes. Costumes. (The best image I could find, from the South China Post coverage of the story, which you can read here, photo originally via Reuters) Because if you’re going to [...]

September 19, 2013 — Scicurious
Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

Education needs more radioactive spiders. Stay with me. Remember Peter Parker? His childhood wasn’t easy. Both of his parents– Richard and Mary– were killed on a mission as double agents.

September 9, 2013 — Scott Barry Kaufman
Genetic Memory: How We Know Things We Never Learned

Genetic Memory: How We Know Things We Never Learned

I met my first savant 52 years ago and have been intrigued with that remarkable condition ever since. One of the most striking and consistent things in the many savants I have seen is that that they clearly know things they never learned.

January 28, 2015 — Darold Treffert
Sight and Sound: An Evening with John Williams and Steven Spielberg

Sight and Sound: An Evening with John Williams and Steven Spielberg

We’re sitting in the front row of the Phoenix Symphony Orchestra, listening to the musicians warm up for the dress rehearsal of tonight’s benefit concert starring John Williams, his movie music, and guest starring Steven Spielberg.

September 28, 2013 — Stephen L. Macknik

Creativity, Madness and Drugs

San Diego—Would we have Poe’s Raven today if the tormented author had taken lithium to suppress his bipolar illness? Not likely, considering the high frequency of psychiatric illnesses among writers and artists, concluded psychiatrist Kay Jamison of Johns Hopkins Medical School speaking last week at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in San Diego.

November 22, 2013 — R. Douglas Fields