ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "emotion"

Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selections: Bipedalism, Emotions, Mass deaths, and Gifts

This week on my ResearchBlogging.org column: Could there be evidence of a second type of bipedalism in the hominid family tree? Possibly—though the evidence is scant. At Lawn Chair Anthropology, Zachary Cofran discusses the potential a 3.4 million year old foot may bring to discussions about evolution. How does your liver feel? The Neuroskeptic discusses [...]

Keep reading »
Dog Spies

What You Don’t Know About Your Dog’s Nostrils

8039373226_f0238601cd_q

Nostrils. Your dog has them. Two of them actually. And you don’t give them any attention, do you? Sure, you might take your dog to the vet when you see gunk coming out of them, but on any given ho-hum day, you’re not giving your dog’s nostrils a second thought. Of course, we all know [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Could chess-boxing defuse aggression in Arizona and beyond?

Teleportation, cloaks of invisibility, smell-o-vision, 3D printing, and even holograms, were all ideas first imagined in science fiction—and now are real products and technologies in various stages of development by scientists. While this is common in fields like experimental physics, it isn’t as often that cognitive neuroscience and applied psychology score insights from this fantasy [...]

Keep reading »
Illusion Chasers

Neuroscience in Fiction: The Princess Bride

The_princess_bride_20th_anniversary_edition_dvd[1]

The novel is a wonderful read, but something that I hadn’t expected is that the plot would revolve so much around the topic of pain, both psychological and physical. As in death, torture, mutilation, and the loss of true love.

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

Technology May Lift Severe Depression, but Full Recovery Takes Time

Courtesy of Dave Gingrich via Flickr.

This blog is the last in a series of guest posts on technology and the brain to celebrate Scientific American Mind’s 10-year anniversary. The magazine’s special November/December issue similarly highlights the interface between code and thought in profiling a future, more digital YOU. I have been a practicing psychiatrist at the Cleveland Clinic since 1989. [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

The Persistent Myth of Holiday Suicide

More urban myth than actual reality, the holiday season does not have the highest incidence for suicide. Though suicide is the most preventable kind of death with an average of 3,000 people dying by suicide each day – November and December actually have the lowest rates of suicide. The highest rate of death by suicide [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

How to Erase Bad Memories

Courtesy of R. Douglas Fields.

I’ll never forget it. They strapped electrodes to my wrist, cranked up a black dial on a frightening electronic device encrusted with switches and knobs, and shocked me repeatedly with jolts of electricity. No, this was not torture and the memory is not a traumatic one. I was inside the laboratory of Dr. Daniela Schiller, [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

The Ancient Marriage between Music, Movement and Mood

Think back to that moment when you first heard your favorite song. What about it made you stop in your tracks? Was it the incessant buildup, soaring high, filling you with a sense of elation? The flirty high notes, light as wings, bringing a bounce in your step? Or the rumbling base drop, furiously cascading, [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

Emotional Needs in Teens May Spur the Growth of New Brain Cells

Until recent decades, the brain was viewed as static. The accepted scientific view was that after early childhood few changes occurred in the connections between neurons and no new brain cells appeared. A new, dynamic model of the brain has emerged from this fixed model. This transition was marked, first by scientific acceptance of the [...]

Keep reading »
Not bad science

Can Pigs Empathize?

Pigs are social animals with complex emotions - but do they empathize?

There are a handful of traits that scientists and philosophers would argue would make us human, including self-awareness and language. Another key part of being human is thought to be our ability to empathize (although I sometimes find myself doubting some humans’ abilities to empathize). I also doubt that we are the only animal that [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

The Best PsycHoliday Stocking Stuffer!

Our gratitude holders.

If there are three things that people tend to have on their minds during the holiday season, it’s a) saving money, b) friends & family, and c) finding the perfect gifts for everyone on their lists. With this in mind, why not step outside of the box when it comes to this year’s stocking stuffers? [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Envying Evolution: What Can The X-Men Teach Us About Stereotypes?

x_men_logo

This weekend marked the opening of X-Men: Days of Future Past, the latest installment in the wildly successful X-Men movie franchise. For those who are unfamiliar with the X-Men series, the stories revolve around groups of ‘mutants,’ super-powered beings who supposedly represent the next stage in human evolution and whose powers run the gamut from [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Blind athletes provide clues about the nature of our emotions.

514px-石井と鈴木

One of the most important ways that we learn how to interact with the world around us is through observational learning. By watching how our friends and family members behave, we learn at a very young age how to do things like turn on a lightbulb, open a door, or play with a doll, without [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Fear and Love on a Shaky Bridge

shakybridge

“Imagine being in the jungle, thousands of miles from civilization…” Thus opened the promo two years ago for Love In The Wild, the “extreme dating experiment” on NBC that sent its contestants on first dates that were jam packed with shaky bridges, crocodile attacks, and bungee jumping. Either NBC replaced their writing staff with former academics, [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

The Psychology of Giving Thanks

romantic_couple_koala_plushie_by_ameliaange-d39f4r2

As we all sit down tonight to feast on turkey and pumpkin pie, many of us will be going around the table giving thanks for our everyday sources of gratitude, like friendships, relationships, and good health. Luckily, there are actually plenty of reasons why Thanksgiving itself can help maintain and improve those very things for [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Email this Article

X