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Posts Tagged "illustration"

@ScientificAmerican

The Evolution of a Scientific American Information Graphic: Stellar Life Cycle

The evolution of a Scientific American information graphic: stellar life cycle

As the art director of information graphics at Scientific American, I’m charged with developing explanatory art for some pretty mind-blowing topics. Our team—text editor, expert author, artist, and me—often works toward illustrating a process or concept that has never been rendered before, or may have only been visualized for other specialists in the field in [...]

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Guest Blog

Words, pictures, and the visual display of scientific information: Getting back to the basics of information design

Data visualization. Infographics. Ooh, better yet, make that interactive infographics. The recent buzz around the visual display of information makes it seem like everyone should be rushing to whip up some multi-colored cartogram, bubble chart or word cloud. Never before have we had both the tools and the vast amounts of raw data to play [...]

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Life, Unbounded

Alien worlds through iPad eyes

Superimposed image of the Milky Way and Australian Aboriginal engraving of 'The Emu In The Sky' (Barnaby Norris)

Scientific illustration has a long and noble history, from ancient depictions of celestial forms to Leonardo Da Vinci’s extraordinary drawings of anatomy and invention, to the latest computer-generated animation splashed across CNN or – perhaps with more reflective thought – the cinematic screens of the world’s great science museums. In English the word ‘illustrate’ has [...]

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SA Visual

Art and Science of the Moiré

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I’m a bit obsessed with Scientific American covers, but my knowledge of the archive during the years before my time on staff is broad rather than deep. Artist Philippe Decrauzat, on the other hand, has developed an intense connection with a very specific cover image: May 1963. It was the inspiration point for his series [...]

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SA Visual

4 Ways to Venus: An Artist’s Assignment

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Irving Geis (1908–1997) is probably best known for illustrations of biological macromolecules, such as his groundbreaking watercolor painting of myoglobin—an exhaustive and beautiful portrait of the first properly sorted protein molecule. (The work appears in “The Three-dimensional Structure of a Protein Molecule,” by John Kendrew, Scientific American, December 1961.) From 1948 through 1983 he lent [...]

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SA Visual

The Evolution of a Scientific American Information Graphic: Stellar Life Cycle

The evolution of a Scientific American information graphic: stellar life cycle

As the art director of information graphics at Scientific American, I’m charged with developing explanatory art for some pretty mind-blowing topics. Our team—text editor, expert author, artist, and me—often works toward illustrating a process or concept that has never been rendered before, or may have only been visualized for other specialists in the field in [...]

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Symbiartic

In Case You’re Tempted to Think 3D Modeling All Looks the Same

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I initially contacted Bryan Christie to request permission to feature his spectacular cheetah illustration in this year’s blitz. He agreed, and so here it is, in all its glory: But he also tipped me off to his fine art work that is equally worthy of note: How could two such disparate styles emanate from the [...]

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Symbiartic

Who Illustrates the Murals at Museums?

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Have you ever wondered who illustrates the murals at our beloved museums, zoos, aquariums, and botanical gardens? Marjorie Leggitt is one such person. Based in Boulder, CO, she has spent her career illuminating science and natural processes through her art. This mural was made for the Denver Botanical Gardens in Denver, CO to illustrate the [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond

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The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as [...]

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Symbiartic

The Marvelous Flying Sauropods of Puttapipat

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There are two kinds of illustrators. Those, like myself who bend fine art and other forms into the service of illustration – and then there are illustrators like Niroot Puttapipat (a.k.a. Himmapaan) who follow in the rich tradition of book illustrators like Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac. In the handling of his art materials and [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Heat Up This Summer

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Take a break from the heat this summer to step into some cool galleries exhibiting scienceart. If the exhibits keep pouring in at this rate, I’ll have to split up this post by region. There are five scienceart exhibits in New York alone! But for those of you who are not in the NY-region, don’t [...]

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Symbiartic

Learning the Art of Science Illustration

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If you’ve ever wondered what it would take to combine your love of science and art, there is a conference on the horizon that might just be the inspiration you’ve been waiting for. This summer in Boulder, CO, the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators is hosting its annual conference and it is not to be [...]

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Symbiartic

For Admirers of Audubon & Sibley, Two Recurring Art Exhibits

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If you appreciate John J. Audubon’s exacting detail and beautiful compositions and you marvel at the encyclopedic knowledge and delicate illustrations in the famous Sibley Bird Guides you may be interested to know that there are many contemporary masters following in their footsteps today. Their names may be less well-known, but their work is equally [...]

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Symbiartic

The ScienceArt Exhibit Roundup for Spring

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This is the dish on the latest exhibits combining science and art around the country. This time the prize for the most bumpin’ scienceArt scene goes to the Northeast, amirite? Lucky you if you live there: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION JESSICA DRENK: An Allegory of Algorithms and Aesthetics April 12 – May 12, 2014 Adah Rose [...]

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Symbiartic

Snake vs. Croc in Real and Hyper-Real Versions

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When illustrators embark upon a new illustration, hours of research and work go into constructing a scene that is believable, powerful, and informative. In 2009, when James Gurney was tasked with reconstructing Titanoboa, the largest snake that ever lived, his first priority was conveying the sheer size of a 48-foot long, 2500-lb. beast. Ultimately, he [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt on View in March/April 2014

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A fresh batch of exhibits combining science and art are going up around the country, plus, there’s still time to catch some of the longer running exhibits that go through the middle of 2014. From John J. Audubon to dark matter to hybrid bodies created with modern transplant technology, there’s something in here for everyone. [...]

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