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Posts Tagged "marine biology"

Anecdotes from the Archive

Spring break sure looked different back then

Woods Holl students

These coeds may be spending some time down at the beach, but as students of the Marine Biological Laboratory at Wood’s Holl, Mass., it’s for work rather than play. The laboratory, featured in the July 4, 1903, Scientific American Supplement, was founded on the belief of naturalist Louis Agassiz: “nature and not books should be [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

A Closer Look at a Tiny, Floating Horde

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It’s a strange but true fact that the young of many familiar sea creatures look nothing like them. Drifting on currents to distribute their kind, they are an unsung part of the plankton, itself an unsung part of the sea. A few years back, I wrote about the work of Richard Kirby, a research fellow [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

What Do Vampire Squid Really Eat? Hint: It’s Not Blood

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Waters nearly devoid of oxygen are not just found off the coast of South America, as we saw last time. “Oxygen minimum zones” may occur throughout the world’s ocean’s at mid-water depths where food consumption is high but supplies of oxygen are low. Although, as I mentioned last time, such waters are dead zones for [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Missing Nitrogen May Be Vanishing in the Tubes of Giant Bacteria

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Off the coast of Mexico’s Baja Peninsula lies a dark, still, deep place. It is called the Soledad Basin, and in it lies a garden of bacteria so large you can see them with your own eyes. A 250-m high ridge on the edge of the Soledad basin traps water inside. No strong currents disturb [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

The Private Life of Plankton — in HD

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Artistic black-and-white photos of plankton — as we saw last time — are fabulous. But what if one hungers for HD? The Plankton Chronicles have got you covered. On Friday I wrote about the Plankton Portal, a project to enlist the public’s help in identifying and cataloguing weird, deep-sea life. Via their blog, I learned [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Wonderful Things: The Universe Between the Sand Grains

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This is the fourth post in the Wonderful Things series. As we saw last time, the thin strip of sand found on beaches is home to many organisms that can dwell no where else. But the strip swept by waves — the intertidal — may be the richest part of all. Living between the wet [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Glass Sponges Poriferify — and Beautify — Impoverished Antarctic Neighborhood

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Glass sponges are taking over a newly sunlit strip of Antarctic marine real estate at a blistering clip, surprising biologists who had no idea they had it in them. And what’s in them, it turns out, is also fairly astounding. The story, as was widely reported last month, is this: Although more than 30% of [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

The Swimming Sea Cucumber and the Exploding Paint Pack

Sea cucumbers aren’t all boring, trundling bags. Some of them swim — and glow. Though I opted to focus on creatures found at greater depths in my last post, one of the creatures observed by the Deepsea Challenger expedition in the New Britain Trench at a relatively shallow 1000 meters was just such a swimming [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

What Lives at the Bottom of the Mariana Trench? More Than You Might Think

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The deepest, darkest, scariest place on the maps I loved pondering as a child was a crescent-shaped canyon in the western Pacific Ocean. It was called the Mariana Trench, and at the very, very bottom was the lowest point on Earth’s surface, the Challenger Deep. Its floor was seven terrifying miles down. What was down [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Diatoms, or The Trouble with Life in Glass Houses

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Blogger’s note: I’m still away from the blog taking care of important life stuff, but I’ll be back soon! This post originally appeared on March 28, 2010. It has been edited slightly. Earlier this week I posted a link to Victorian microscope slides that included arranged diatom art. People really seemed to respond to the [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

The Overlooked Joy of the Christmas Tree Worm

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While in the southern hemisphere, I’ve taken every opportunity I can to dive. It’s the hiking of the submarine world: good exercise, and lots of pretty stuff to see. One my final dives, on the reefs of the remote island of Rarotonga in the New-Zealand -dministered Cook Islands*(see here for locator map), I encountered an [...]

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Culturing Science

Collapsed cod fishery shows signs of life

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Perhaps our species’s greatest misconception about the sea was that it is inexhaustible. The idea seems rather silly now, in a world where most people are familiar with the word “overfishing.” But men once gazed into the deep and imagined that it teemed with life so plentiful that we could take and take without ever [...]

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Expeditions

All Aboard: how you can be a part of our research blog

Hi there! I’m Rose, a science journalist and producer. I live in Brooklyn now, where I write, produce and generally try to explain science-y things. But in a few weeks, I’ll be writing to you from somewhere far, far away from Brooklyn: the North Atlantic Ocean. I’m heading out to sea with a research group [...]

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Expeditions

Squid studies: How does one get ready for an expedition?

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Editor’s Note: Marine biologist William Gilly is on an expedition to study Humboldt squid on the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System research vessel New Horizon in the Gulf of California. He and other scientists will spend the coming weeks learning about the giant squid, their biology and ecology on this National Science Foundation-funded expedition. This is [...]

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Guest Blog

To catch a fallen sea angel: A mighty mollusk detects ocean acidification

  "What’s more," snapped the Lorax. (His dander was up.) "Let me say a few words about Gluppity-Glupp. Your machine chugs on, day and night without stop making Gluppity-Glupp. Also Schloppity-Schlopp. And what do you do with this leftover goo?… I’ll show you. You dirty old Once-ler man, you! "You’re glumping the pond where the [...]

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Running Ponies

New carnivorous harp sponge discovered in deep sea

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You may remember the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) from such discoveries as the Yeti crab, the squid with elbows and my personal favourite, the pigbutt worm, and now they’re back with footage of a new species of carnivorous sponge. Seventeen years ago, Jean Vacelet and Nicole Boury-Esnault from the Centre of Oceanology at [...]

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Running Ponies

Eunice aphroditois is rainbow, terrifying

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If Hell’s a glittery rainbow party of terror, you’ll find this guy having post-drinks in the pub at 10am. This is Eunice aphroditois, otherwise known as a bobbit worm. Apparently around 20 years ago, an underwater photographer thought it and other species in the Eunice genus were reminiscent enough of the Bobbitt family incident of [...]

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Running Ponies

Monsters in a barrel, sea slugs and the art of (man-o) war

Because I’ll never grow tired of seeing incredible footage of sea creatures, here are a few of the best ones I’ve seen lately. First up, a video by a group called Coral Morphologic, which is an art-science project led by James Cook University-educated marine biologist Colin Foord, and American musician Jared McKay. “With the aquarium [...]

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Running Ponies

Hitchhiking jellyfish, gonad-loving parasites and the skeleton shrimp

I recently came across this incredible underwater photography by russian marine biologist and underwater photographer, Alexander Semenov – head of the White Sea Biological Station deep-sea diving team from the Lomonosov Moscow State University. And as always with sea creatures, an investigation into the way they work reveals that they are truly just as bizarre [...]

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Running Ponies

Get on your bike, Phallostethus cuulong

Who says genitals have to be between your legs? A new species of fish has literally turned the genital game on its head and is quietly running with it in the murky Meking River. Discovered in 2009 by zoologist Koichi Shibukawa from the Nagao Natural Environment Foundation in Tokyo, Japan, and described in a recent [...]

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Running Ponies

Pyura chilensis: the closest thing to getting blood from a stone

“Period Rock? You’re calling me Period Rock now? Guys, seriously, I might look like a stone, but that doesn’t mean I have the heart of one. Why doesn’t anyone ever just call me Michael?” **** Despite appearances, this is not some kind of cruelly bisected alien stone organism or a tomato thunderegg. This is Pyura [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

More Oarfish And This Time They’re Alive

In October, two oarfish mysteriously washed up dead on beaches in Southern California. It’s unusual to find one intact oarfish carcass, so the fact that there were two within days of each other had scientists scratching their heads. While it was probably nothing more than coincidence, researchers quickly took the opportunity to study the intact [...]

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