ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network













Rosetta Stones

Rosetta Stones


Adventures in the good science of rock-breaking.
Rosetta Stones Home

“Time and Space, Space and Time”

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


Email   PrintPrint



 

Time and Space, Space and Time. Tick: a life form emerges; Tock: a sun explodes; Tick: a galaxy is ripped apart; Tock: a star is formed. Our universe is absolutely amazing.

-Sardior Ruby

 

Monarch butterfly emerging from chrysalis. Image courtesy Sid Mosdell (SidPix)

Monarch butterfly emerging from chrysalis. Image courtesy Sid Mosdell (SidPix)

NGC 6302: The Butterfly Nebula. A dying star that was once about five times the mass of the Sun is at the center of this fury. Image and caption courtesy NASA.

NGC 6302: The Butterfly Nebula. A dying star that was once about five times the mass of the Sun is at the center of this fury. Image and caption courtesy NASA.

 

Arp 194. This interacting group contains several galaxies, along with a "cosmic fountain" of stars, gas, and dust that stretches over 100,000 light-years. Image and caption courtesy NASA.

Arp 194. This interacting group contains several galaxies, along with a "cosmic fountain" of stars, gas, and dust that stretches over 100,000 light-years. Image and caption courtesy NASA.

 

Sharpless 2-106. A massive, young star, IRS 4 (Infrared Source 4), is responsible for the furious activity we see in the nebula. Image and caption courtesy NASA.

Sharpless 2-106. A massive, young star, IRS 4 (Infrared Source 4), is responsible for the furious activity we see in the nebula. Image and caption courtesy NASA.

 

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it is tied to everything else in the universe.

-John Muir (1838-1914) U. S. naturalist, explorer.

 

I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale.

Marie Curie (1867 – 1934)

Chemical compound being drawn by female chemist. Image courtesy DARPA via Wikimedia Commons.

Chemical compound being drawn by an unidentified chemist. Image courtesy DARPA via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Aerogel cube & Peter Tsou, JPL Scientist, Stardust Deputy Principal Investigator. Image courtesy NASA via Wikimedia Commons.

Aerogel cube & Peter Tsou, JPL Scientist, Stardust Deputy Principal Investigator. Image courtesy NASA via Wikimedia Commons.

 

If one is sufficiently lavish with time, everything possible happens.

- Herodotus

Chlorion aerarium, Cumberland, Maryland, July 2012. Image courtesy USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Laboratory via Fotopedia.

Chlorion aerarium, Cumberland, Maryland, July 2012. Image courtesy USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Laboratory via Fotopedia.

 

This artist's concept features NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover, a mobile robot for investigating Mars' past or present ability to sustain microbial life. Curiosity landed near the Martian equator about 10:31 p.m., Aug. 5 PDT (1:31 a.m. Aug. 6 EDT) In this picture, the rover examines a rock on Mars with a set of tools at the end of the rover's arm, which extends about 7 feet (2 meters). Two instruments on the arm can study rocks up close. A drill can collect sample material from inside of rocks and a scoop can pick up samples of soil. The arm can sieve the samples and deliver fine powder to instruments inside the rover for thorough analysis. The mast, or rover's "head," rises to about 6.9 feet (2.1 meters) above ground level, about as tall as a basketball player. This mast supports two remote-sensing science instruments: the Mast Camera, or "eyes," for stereo color viewing of surrounding terrain and material collected by the arm; and, the Chemistry and Camera instrument, which uses a laser to vaporize a speck of material on rocks up to about 23 feet (7 meters) away and determines what elements the rocks are made of.

This artist's concept features NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover, a mobile robot for investigating Mars' past or present ability to sustain microbial life. Curiosity landed near the Martian equator about 10:31 p.m., Aug. 5 PDT (1:31 a.m. Aug. 6 EDT) In this picture, the rover examines a rock on Mars with a set of tools at the end of the rover's arm, which extends about 7 feet (2 meters). Two instruments on the arm can study rocks up close. A drill can collect sample material from inside of rocks and a scoop can pick up samples of soil. The arm can sieve the samples and deliver fine powder to instruments inside the rover for thorough analysis. The mast, or rover's "head," rises to about 6.9 feet (2.1 meters) above ground level, about as tall as a basketball player. This mast supports two remote-sensing science instruments: the Mast Camera, or "eyes," for stereo color viewing of surrounding terrain and material collected by the arm; and, the Chemistry and Camera instrument, which uses a laser to vaporize a speck of material on rocks up to about 23 feet (7 meters) away and determines what elements the rocks are made of. Image and caption courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech via Wikimedia Commons.

 

“Rivers shift, oceans fall, and mountains drift.”

-R.E.M., “Feeling Gravity’s Pull”


 

We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.

-Maria Mitchell, Astronomer (1818-1889)

An estimated 10,000 galaxies are revealed in humankind's deepest portrait of the visible universe ever. Image and caption courtesy NASA/ESA/S. Beckwith(STScI) and The HUDF Team.

An estimated 10,000 galaxies are revealed in humankind's deepest portrait of the visible universe ever.

 

Imaging of the tonoplast intrinsic protein in Arabidopsis roots. Image courtesy S. Gattolin et al via Fotopedia.

Imaging of the tonoplast intrinsic protein in Arabidopsis roots. Image courtesy S. Gattolin et al via Fotopedia.

 

 

If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living.

-Jules Henri Poincaré (1854-1912), French mathematician.


 

The first time they tell you that the world’s turning and you just can’t quite believe it ’cause everything looks like it’s standing still…. I can feel it. The turn of the Earth. The ground beneath our feet is spinning at 1,000 miles an hour and the entire planet is hurtling around the sun at 67,000 miles an hour, and I can feel it. We’re falling through space, you and me, clinging to the skin of this tiny little world, and if we let go….

-The Doctor, “Rose”

 

Sun over Earth. Image courtesy NASA.

Sun over Earth. Image courtesy NASA.

 

(Originally published at En Tequila Es Verdad)

Image credits and references:

1. Monarch Life Cycle by SidPix.

2. NGC 6302 by NASA.

3. Arp 194 by NASA. More info at Wired.

4. Sharpless 2-106 by NASA.

5. Chemical Compound Being Drawn by DARPA.

6. Aerogel Cube & Peter Tsou by NASA.

7. Chlorion Aerarium by USGS.

8. Curiosity: Robot Geologist and Chemist by NASA.

9. Hubble Ultra Deep Field by NASA.

10. The Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein by S. Gattolin et al.

11. Earth and Sun by NASA. Modified version of image 44.

Dana Hunter About the Author: Dana Hunter is a science blogger, SF writer, and geology addict whose home away from SciAm is En Tequila Es Verdad. Follow her on Twitter: @dhunterauthor. Follow on Twitter @dhunterauthor.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.



Previous: Men, STEM, and Balance: Gilbert More
Rosetta Stones
Next: Look, Ma, I’m on NASA!




Rights & Permissions

Add Comment

Add a Comment
You must sign in or register as a ScientificAmerican.com member to submit a comment.

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Back To School

Back to School Sale!

12 Digital Issues + 4 Years of Archive Access just $19.99

Order Now >

X

Email this Article



This function is currently unavailable

X