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Posts Tagged "vi hart"

Roots of Unity

Some Infinities Are Bigger than Other Infinities, and Some Are Just the Same Size

How to count potatoes by pairing them with numbers. Image: Yen Duong.

Warning: contains minor spoilers for The Fault in Our Stars. I recently read The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, now a major motion picture that has led to theft in Amsterdam and a shortage of dry eyes in movie theaters around the world. One of the ideas that resonates with Hazel, the 16-year-old narrator [...]

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Roots of Unity

Nothing Is More Fun than a Hypercube of Monkeys

More Fun than a Hypercube of Monkeys, a sculpture by Henry Segerman and Will Segerman. The monkeys do not all look like they are the same size, but that is due to the stereographic projection technique used to visualize a 4-dimensional object in 3-d. (Similarly, if one part of a 3-d object is closer to a surface than another part, it will appear larger when projected to that surface.) Image: Henry Segerman and Will Segerman.

Monkeys! Mathematical groups! 4-dimensional geometry! Together at last! This sculpture, called More Fun than a Hypercube of Monkeys, answers an open question: has the quaternion group ever appeared as the symmetry group of an object? Thanks to mathematician Henry Segerman and mathemusician Vi Hart, the answer is now yes. Their very readable paper about the sculpture [...]

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Roots of Unity

A Mathematical Thanksgiving Celebration

A more realistic picture of how Borromean rings can occur in the real world. Image: public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

Last year, the inimitable Vi Hart made a Thanksgiving video series, describing how to imbue your holiday celebration with more mathematics. My favorite video is the one about Borromean onion rings, perhaps because I’ve been slightly obsessed with Borromean rings for a while. Borromean rings are three circles that are connected so that if you [...]

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Roots of Unity

The Top n Math Videos Involving Food

Romanesco, a cruciferous, fractal vegetable. Image: cyclonebill, via Wikimedia Commons.

It’s food week here on the Scientific American blog network. Food is a really important part of our health, and there’s a lot to learn about the science of food: taste, health, agriculture, how we eat. You could be reading enlightening, important articles about GMO labeling and antibiotic use in farming, or the first posts [...]

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Roots of Unity

A Twelve-Tone Trip Down Memory Lane, Courtesy of Vi Hart

Isn't that pretty?

Last week Vi Hart posted a wonderful 30-minute video on twelve-tone music, and it really took me back! (If the video doesn’t load for you, watch it on YouTube.) Ten years ago, I hadn’t yet decided I wanted to do math. In fact, I was enjoying my music theory classes immensely, and I thought I [...]

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