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Posts Tagged "art history"

Brainwaves

A Brief History of Mental Illness in Art

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“Historically, many cases of demonic possession have masked major psychiatric disorder[s].”-Kazuhiro Tajima-Pozo et. al. BMJ Case Reports 2009 “Juana (also known as Joanna and Joan) of Castile was born in Toledo, Spain on 6 November 1479, the third child of Queen Isabella of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon. Not long after her marriage [...]

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Roots of Unity

The Slowest Way to Draw a Lute

Man Drawing a Lute, by Albrecht Dürer. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

Last month, I went to a talk by mathematician Annalisa Crannell of Franklin and Marshall College called Math and Art: the good, the bad, and the pretty. She talked about how mathematical ideas of perspective show up in art and how it can help us create and appreciate art. One of my favorite parts of the [...]

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Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

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For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

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Symbiartic

A Wondrous Look Inside a Tuft of Grass

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500 years ago, artist and engraver Albrecht Dürer took the time to carefully and meticulously paint the >Great Piece of Turf. In both the Northern and Southern European Renaissance, studies in preparation of a larger painting were not uncommon. One of the many remarkable features of Dürer’s study is that it appears to have been [...]

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Symbiartic

Mossy Drops of Water

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Mineo Mizuno is a sculptor whose fascination with water as a central part of our existence took him on a journey resulting in this stunning series of large-scale moss-covered ceramic discs. His desire to capture the nature of water – its luminous, almost spritely character – lead him to perfect the form of a flattened [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond

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The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Ultramarine

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The Virgin in Prayer, 1640-50, by Sassoferrato. National Gallery, UK. When I write these Pinch of Pigment posts, alternate, catchier titles come to mind. This one could be called “Why Blue is a Girl’s Colour” or “The Economics of Symbols”. Ultramarine Blue is one of the most important pigments in Western fine art history. And [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Quinacradone Burnt Orange

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The first time I had ever heard of Quinacradone Burnt Orange (C20H12N2O2) was after starting to work for an art supply company, DeSerres, that I worked for for the next 10 years. That was also when I first started becoming fascinated by pigments. A number of the staff were excited about trying different pigments, and [...]

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Symbiartic

Can Machines Produce Art that Moves Us?

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This happens more often than you’d think: You tell someone you are an illustrator. They ask you a few questions and then get to what’s really on their mind: “So, do you do all your work on the computer or do you draw everything by hand?” When you respond that you do some (or all) [...]

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Symbiartic

For Admirers of Audubon & Sibley, Two Recurring Art Exhibits

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If you appreciate John J. Audubon’s exacting detail and beautiful compositions and you marvel at the encyclopedic knowledge and delicate illustrations in the famous Sibley Bird Guides you may be interested to know that there are many contemporary masters following in their footsteps today. Their names may be less well-known, but their work is equally [...]

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Symbiartic

The Other Immortality

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Students like I once was, Copying studies like Dürer once made, Of a skull, once with a name. Just like our genes, little carbon marks drift little changes over time.

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Cobalt Blue

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Cobalt Blue is a fascinating colour with a much longer history than many pigments in use today. It’s also the only goblin hiding in the Periodic Table. Cobalt, is symbol Co on the periodic table with an atomic weight of 27. While in it’s natural, raw state it’s a somewhat burnished silver colour, it is [...]

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