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Posts Tagged "art history"

Roots of Unity

The Slowest Way to Draw a Lute

Man Drawing a Lute, by Albrecht Dürer. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

Last month, I went to a talk by mathematician Annalisa Crannell of Franklin and Marshall College called Math and Art: the good, the bad, and the pretty. She talked about how mathematical ideas of perspective show up in art and how it can help us create and appreciate art. One of my favorite parts of the [...]

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Symbiartic

What Can We Learn From Renaissance Vegetables?

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Just throwing this out there. Has there been an attempt to track the meandering flow of selective breeding of fruits, vegetables and flowers by using still life paintings since the Renaissance? Are any vegetables significantly different in say, these face illusions by Giuseppe Arcimboldo (~1526-1593) than they would appear now? According to the Carrot Museum, [...]

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Symbiartic

Father Time Overcome by Hope, Love and Beauty

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It is not enough to see the ugliness of 2014 overcome by the grind of time and the ball drop of New Year’s Eve. We should want the exhausting and terrible year to be overcome by memories of 2014′s hope, love and beauty, just as in this Baroque era painting by French artist Simon Vouet. [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Can Black Paint be Vegan?

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Vegan, but not edible. [Photo by the author] A surprising amount of art can be made by tools that have been burnt in a fire. Willow or vine charcoals are made from charred willow or vine branches. Verona Brown is the ancient pigment Terre Verte after being exposed to high heat. And there are paints [...]

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Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

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For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

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Symbiartic

A Wondrous Look Inside a Tuft of Grass

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500 years ago, artist and engraver Albrecht Dürer took the time to carefully and meticulously paint the >Great Piece of Turf. In both the Northern and Southern European Renaissance, studies in preparation of a larger painting were not uncommon. One of the many remarkable features of Dürer’s study is that it appears to have been [...]

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Symbiartic

Mossy Drops of Water

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Mineo Mizuno is a sculptor whose fascination with water as a central part of our existence took him on a journey resulting in this stunning series of large-scale moss-covered ceramic discs. His desire to capture the nature of water – its luminous, almost spritely character – lead him to perfect the form of a flattened [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond

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The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Ultramarine

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The Virgin in Prayer, 1640-50, by Sassoferrato. National Gallery, UK. When I write these Pinch of Pigment posts, alternate, catchier titles come to mind. This one could be called “Why Blue is a Girl’s Colour” or “The Economics of Symbols”. Ultramarine Blue is one of the most important pigments in Western fine art history. And [...]

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Symbiartic

Pinch of Pigment: Quinacradone Burnt Orange

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The first time I had ever heard of Quinacradone Burnt Orange (C20H12N2O2) was after starting to work for an art supply company, DeSerres, that I worked for for the next 10 years. That was also when I first started becoming fascinated by pigments. A number of the staff were excited about trying different pigments, and [...]

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Symbiartic

Can Machines Produce Art that Moves Us?

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This happens more often than you’d think: You tell someone you are an illustrator. They ask you a few questions and then get to what’s really on their mind: “So, do you do all your work on the computer or do you draw everything by hand?” When you respond that you do some (or all) [...]

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