ADVERTISEMENT
Roots of Unity

Roots of Unity

Mathematics: learning it, doing it, celebrating it.

  • A Few of My Favorite Spaces: The Topologist's Sine Curve

    A Few of My Favorite Spaces: The Topologist's Sine Curve

    By Evelyn Lamb | 3 hours ago |

    There are four basic properties of sets that beginning analysis and topology students see: open, closed , compact, and connected. Of those properties, it seems like connectedness should be the easiest. Connected has a pretty clear meaning in English. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Proof, Pudding, and Pi: Math Books that Will Make You Hungry

    Proof, Pudding, and Pi: Math Books that Will Make You Hungry

    By Evelyn Lamb | May 24, 2015 |

    This spring delivered not one but two books containing both mathematics and recipes to my doorstep. The first,  How to Bake Pi  by  Eugenia Cheng , is “an edible exploration of the mathematics of mathematics,” category theory. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Grapefruit Math

    Grapefruit Math

    By Evelyn Lamb | May 19, 2015 |

    I taught a topology and geometry class this semester, and one of the topics we covered was spherical geometry. One of the interesting properties of spherical geometry is the fact that on a given sphere, the angles in a triangle completely determine the side lengths and area of the triangle. […]

    Keep reading »

  • A Few of My Favorite Spaces: Fat Cantor Sets

    By Evelyn Lamb | April 30, 2015 |

    Last month, I wrote about the Cantor set , a mathematical space that is an interesting mix of small and large. It’s small in the sense that its length is 0. But it’s large in the sense that it’s uncountable. Once a mathematician get their hands on an object, one of their first instincts is to tweak it and see what happens. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Mathematics, Live: A Conversation with Katie Steckles and Laura Taalman

    By Evelyn Lamb | April 24, 2015 |

    Katie Steckles is a math communicator based in Manchester, England. Laura Taalman is a Professor of Mathematics at James Madison University who has been on leave to work first as the Mathematician-in-Residence at the Museum of Mathematics in New York City, and now as Senior Product Manager for Education at the 3D-printer company MakerBot in Brooklyn. […]

    Keep reading »

  • In Praise of Fractals and Poetry

    In Praise of Fractals and Poetry

    By Evelyn Lamb | April 20, 2015 |

    A portion of the Mandelbrot set, which may be the world's most famous fractal. Image: Wolfgangbeyer, via Wikimedia Commons. This year for Math Poetry month , I read Proportions of the Heart: Poems that Play with Mathematics , a collection of poems by Emily Grosholz. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Lambert on Love and Hate in Geometry

    Lambert on Love and Hate in Geometry

    By Evelyn Lamb | April 13, 2015 |

      Johann Heinrich Lambert. Image: public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.   The history of hyperbolic geometry is filled with hyperbolic quotes , and I came across a beautiful one earlier this semester in my math history class. […]

    Keep reading »

  • The Cantor Function: Angel or Devil?

    The Cantor Function: Angel or Devil?

    By Evelyn Lamb | March 31, 2015 |

    When you’re looking at it, it just stays there, constant and still. But if you turn your back for just an instant at a point in the Cantor set, the function grows impossibly quickly. It’s not a Weeping Angel , it’s the Devil’s staircase, or, if you’re a little less whimsical, the Cantor function . […]

    Keep reading »

  • A Few of My Favorite Spaces: The Cantor Set

    A Few of My Favorite Spaces: The Cantor Set

    By Evelyn Lamb | March 26, 2015 |

    Last month, I wrote about the π-Base , a website that serves a similar function to the book Counterexamples in Topology . I’m teaching a topology class this semester, and it’s been fun to revisit some good counterexamples. As a new series on the blog, I’ll be writing about some of these strange and interesting mathematical spaces. […]

    Keep reading »

  • What’s so Great about Continued Fractions?

    What’s so Great about Continued Fractions?

    By Evelyn Lamb | March 17, 2015 |

    The more I learn about continued fractions, the more enamored I am with them. Last week, when I wrote about how much better continued fractions are than the arbitrary decimal digits we usually use to describe numbers , I mentioned that continued fractions tell us the “best approximations” of irrational numbers. […]

    Keep reading »


Show More

The perfect movie companion to
Jurassic World

Add promo-code: Jurassic
to your cart and get this digital issue for just $7.99!

Hurry this sale ends soon >

X

Email this Article

X