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Roots of Unity

Roots of Unity


Mathematics: learning it, doing it, celebrating it.
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    Evelyn Lamb Evelyn Lamb is a postdoc at the University of Utah. She writes about mathematics and other cool stuff. Follow on Twitter @evelynjlamb.
  • Math Twitter Bots, Reviewed and Rated

    Math+Twitter Image: Design Shack.

    In the course of being a math person on Twitter, I have run across some math-related Twitter bots and feeds. It would just be mean to grade my human tweeps, but I have no qualms about rating the bots! Taking a page from the Aperiodical’s integer sequence reviews, I’m rating them on a scale of [...]

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    The Shocking Failure of British Rail Travel to Respect the Triangle Inequality

    A British train approaches a station. Image: Ingy the Wingy, via flickr.

    I spent about a month in the UK earlier this summer, and that meant I took a lot of train trips. I love riding trains: the feeling of endless possibility I get when I look at the departure boards, the countryside rolling by, the fantastic people-watching, the two-hour delay between Edinburgh and Manchester because a [...]

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    Some Infinities Are Bigger than Other Infinities, and Some Are Just the Same Size

    How to count potatoes by pairing them with numbers. Image: Yen Duong.

    Warning: contains minor spoilers for The Fault in Our Stars. I recently read The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, now a major motion picture that has led to theft in Amsterdam and a shortage of dry eyes in movie theaters around the world. One of the ideas that resonates with Hazel, the 16-year-old narrator [...]

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    British Objects of Constant Width

    Several British objects of constant width. Image: Evelyn Lamb.

    As I wrap up a trip to the UK, I reflect on the many objects of constant width I encountered here. I’ll let Numberphile tell you a little more about objects of constant width. Almost immediately after getting off the plane at Heathrow, I got some breakfast and some change in the form of metal [...]

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    Really Big Numbers (Book Review)

    Really Big Numbers by Richard Schwartz, will be published by the American Mathematical Society on July 3, 2014.

    “Now and then we pluck numbers from the blur…numbers which have no names except the ones we might now give them…souvenirs from alien, unknowable worlds.” -Really Big Numbers by Richard Evan Schwartz Really Big Numbers by Richard Schwartz, a mathematician at Brown University, is the first children’s book published by the American Mathematical Society. (Disclosure: [...]

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    The Most Mathematically Perfect Day of the Year

    Paley9-perfect.svg

    Whether you write it 6/28 or 28/6, today is a perfect day. A perfect number is a number that is the sum of its factors besides itself, and 6 (1+2+3) and 28 (1+2+4+7+14) are the first two perfect numbers. Hence, June 28 is a perfect day. Perfect numbers are few and far between, so don’t [...]

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    2, 4, 6, 8, What Does Not Associate?

    facebookmathproblem

    Last month, I wrote about group theory via monkeys, and it got me thinking about the associative property. A mathematical group consists of a collection of stuff: integers, or rational numbers, or even something more abstract; and an operation that combines any two elements of your stuff into another element of stuff. One of the [...]

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    How to Make “e-1″ Salad Dressing

    Delicious salad not included in this dressing recipe. Image: Geoff Peters, via flickr.

    What does math taste like? Andrea Hawksley recently posted a recipe for Fibonacci lemonade, a drink that is inspired by the famous Fibonacci sequence: 1,1,2,3,5,8, and so on. It is a thing of beauty to behold, and as you drink it, you actually taste successive approximations of the golden ratio due to the relationship between [...]

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    How Not to Be Wrong (Book Review)

    How Not to Be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg. Image courtesy of Penguin Press.

    How Not to Be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg. Image courtesy of Penguin Press. How Not to Be Wrong, the first popular math book by University of Wisconsin-Madison math professor Jordan Ellenberg, just hit the shelves. In addition to a Ph.D. in math, Ellenberg has an MFA in creative writing and has been writing about math [...]

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    A Higher Murder Rate than New York and Los Angeles Combined

    Non-Violence, a sculpture by Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd in Malmö, Sweden. Image: Francois Polito, via Wikimedia Commons.

    Today on the radio, I heard an announcer say, “Chicago has a higher murder rate than New York and Los Angeles combined.” The compassionate human being in me cringed, and the statistical pedant in me also cringed. What does that mean? When I heard, “New York and Los Angeles combined,” I intuitively thought of combining [...]

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