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"health"954 articles archived since 1845

Meet the Feeders: Getting Off by Getting Fat

“If I offered you a million dollars if you could have an orgasm in the next 60 seconds,” said the psychologist to the woman, “what would you do or fantasize about in order to achieve that orgasm as quickly as possible?” “I would use my vibrator and probably run the other hand over the thicker [...]

August 2, 2013 — Jesse Bering

NCCAM features musical training lecture

Although music therapy is a hot topic, its mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), a division of the federal government that investigates unconventional therapies, invited Aniruddh Patel to talk about the possible effects of musical training on language and speech processing.

July 31, 2013 — Princess Ojiaku
The Komodo Dead: What Really Kills in The Walking Dead

The Komodo Dead: What Really Kills in The Walking Dead

You don't need a gun. You don't need a knife or a machete or an axe. If you find yourself in a post-apocalyptic world filled with shambling swallowers of human flesh, what you really need is good hygiene.

March 25, 2013 — Kyle Hill

The ethics of opting out of vaccination.

At my last visit to urgent care with one of my kids, the doctor who saw us mentioned that there is currently an epidemic of pertussis (whooping cough) in California, one that presents serious danger for the very young children (among others) hanging out in the waiting area.

June 29, 2013 — Janet D. Stemwedel

Fussy eaters: the favoured food of Salmonella

As antibiotic resistance increases the search for new anti-bacterial treatments becomes more and more important. One way to design anti-bacterials is to find specific biochemical pathways that the bacteria require to survive, and develop drugs that block off these pathways.

July 13, 2014 — S.E. Gould

Sauerkraut: bacteria making food

Last week my husband needed some jars for cooking purposes. Tesco sell jars for somewhere around £3 each. However they also sell large jars full of sauerkraut for £1 each.

July 26, 2014 — S.E. Gould
The Emergence of Death and Dying as We Know It

The Emergence of Death and Dying as We Know It

Once upon a time, people died in their homes. Up until the time of death they were cared for by friends, family members, and appointed religious leaders.

November 26, 2014 — Krystal D'Costa
How Networks Are Revolutionizing Scientific (and Maybe Human) Thought

How Networks Are Revolutionizing Scientific (and Maybe Human) Thought

Science and common sense are alike grounded in human experience. Yet these ways of thinking about things are often in conflict. Sometimes the simplicity of most commonsense explanations can make it hard to win people over to the complexity and uncertainties of most scientific arguments.

December 12, 2014 — John Edward Terrell, Termeh Shafie and Mark Golitko
Elegy for Rural Community Hospitals

Elegy for Rural Community Hospitals

In a pattern being repeated across the country, the Boothbay, Maine peninsula's hospital has been shuttered, and the communities just lost their bid to even have a 24 hour urgent care on the peninsula.

December 11, 2014 — Judy Stone
The Art and Science of Peppermint

The Art and Science of Peppermint

I love the latest video from the folks at USC Dornsife, all about the art and science of peppermint. In addition to being a fun, fast paced and visually pleasing film, this work gives us a lot of basic information about peppermint from diverse points of view including psychology, history, art, neurobiology — and more.

December 11, 2014 — Carin Bondar
Strange bedfellows

Strange bedfellows

“You wanna talk? Let’s talk.” The 42-year-old man sits up straighter in the hospital bed and grins a toothless grin.

November 29, 2014 — Ilana Yurkiewicz
How an Agnostic Science Writer Celebrates Winter Solstice

How an Agnostic Science Writer Celebrates Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice, darkest day of the year, is fast approaching. So once again I’m posting an edited version of a column I originally wrote for The New York Times more than a decade ago, when I was still married and living in a Hudson Valley hamlet.

December 19, 2014 — John Horgan
Dr. Fist-Bump

Dr. Fist-Bump

Image Credit: Ghareeb et al. (2013), Journal of Hospital Infection Source: Fist Bumps for Germophobes by Christina Agapakis on Oscillator The thought of outlawing handshakes and making fist bumps mandatory for hospital employees might strike you as rather amusing.

August 7, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Europe Should Reject the Call to Eliminate Its Science Adviser

Europe Should Reject the Call to Eliminate Its Science Adviser

More and more often, societies around the world are facing a conflict that puts us all at risk. People reject scientific evidence when it does not fit their worldviews and values, challenging governments to make evidence-based policies that do the most good for the most people over the long term, but also respond to short-term [...]

August 13, 2014 — David Ropeik
Food fears: A social issue?

Food fears: A social issue?

From high-fructose corn syrup to lean finely textured beef, health or safety concerns about specific food ingredients can capture the public's attention and have the potential to significantly impact the food industry.

July 25, 2014 — Julianne Wyrick

Ebola and Priorities in Drug Development

News is rapidly changing regarding Ebola. Even as I've been writing this post, we've gone from "There is no treatment except supportive care" to NIH's Dr.

August 5, 2014 — Judy Stone