ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "vaccines"

Guest Blog

The Lesson of the Fear of Vaccines.

Time for Society to Say Enough is Enough.          The science community laments that people deny the evidence science produces. Usually this complaint is merely descriptive, intellectual frustration sometimes tinged with arrogance. Sometimes the criticism of denialism also offers solutions, which usually include education and communication to make the deniers stop denying, to make [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Short Story Science: Lenina versus the Pneumococcus

Today is January 28, and Lenina has a smashing headache; she is a Streptococcus pneumoniae researcher. Not that this was the main reason for the headache, but an important meeting was being held today to launch the Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network’s [PMEN] new paper in Science. Oddly enough, her role at the meeting is to [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

The impossibility of responsible nuance in the vaccine discussion

Yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled 6–2 in Bruesewitz v. Wyeth, a case involving parents’ rights to sue vaccine manufacturers. Before getting into the particulars, here’s some important background: In the early 1980s, literally hundreds of lawsuits were filed in civil courts claiming children had been harmed by the whole-cell pertussis component of the diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT) [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Review: How the Internet is being used to hijack medical science for fear and profit

In his new book, Tabloid Medicine: How The Internet Is Being Used to Hijack Medical Science for Fear and Profit, Robert Goldberg, PhD, explains why the Internet is a double-edged sword when it comes to health information. On the one hand, the Web can empower people with quality medical information that can help them make [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

The Huffington Post and the ongoing fear that vaccines might cause autism

Almost exactly 13 years ago, Andrew Wakefield addressed a group of reporters in a conference room at London’s Royal Free Hospital to discuss a 12-child case study he and some colleagues had written up positing a theoretical connection between the measles-mumps-rubella virus and gut disorders and then between those gut disorders and autism. Before the [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

The perception gap: An explanation for why people maintain irrational fears

A number of wonderful books decry the public’s seemingly irrational perceptions of risk. Seth Mnookin’s The Panic Virus is the latest, and builds on Michael Specter’s Denialism and Chris Mooney’s Unscientific America. Strong as each book is, unfortunately none get to the heart of the matter, and describes not how we feel, but WHY. Why [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

In the wake of Wakefield: Risk-perception and vaccines

Last May British medical authorities stripped Dr. Andrew Wakefield of his license to practice medicine. In case the name isn’t familiar, Wakefield was the lead author of the 1998 paper published in The Lancet (and later retracted) that set off worldwide fear of vaccines. Now the British Medical Journal has jumped in, publishing an investigative [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Getting Killed for Saving Lives

Three suicide bombers stormed the office of the International Red Cross in Jalabad, Afghanistan earlier today and at least one guard has been killed. No one has so far claimed responsibility, but al-Qaeda has targeted the group in the past whereas the Taliban has not, according to the Wall Street Journal. The incident follows an [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Election: Romney and Obama Tied on Vaccines

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

How do you know that a real-live human being is behind the past 14 weeks of blog posts exploring the individual questions posed to presidential candidates by ScienceDebate.org? Because people make mistakes. Last week I inadvertently posted the vaccine answers to the analysis about rare earth elements. Thanks to sijodk for politely pointing out the [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

What Really Happened in Malta This September When Contagious Bird Flu Was First Announced

malta ESWI meeting

A controversy over whether the U.S. government should allow details of a deadly new flu strain to be published in scientific journals has recently caught fire in the media. But I first heard the news of the mutated virus months ago in Malta at the European Scientific Working group on Influenza (ESWI) meeting. The morning [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Nearly 400 Accidents with Dangerous Pathogens and Biotoxins Reported in U.S. Labs over 7 Years

working in biosafety level-4

A workplace accident might mean a paper cut or spilled coffee for many—or even loss of life or limb for others. For a select few scientists, however, a little slipup on the job could release a deadly virus or toxin into the environment. Some 395 reported “potential release events” of “select agents” occurred in U.S. [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Vaccine for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Remains Safe

vaccination

By now, you’re probably aware of the hype over a vaccine associated with these three letters: HPV. Designed to prevent people from acquiring human papillomavirus, some strains of which can lead to cervical, vulval, anal and vaginal cancer in women not to mention cancers of the anus and penis in men, the HPV vaccine has [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Science Merit Badges

ScienceMeritBadges-01

I was only in the Girl Scouts for a few years, but I really like the idea of merit badges: you do a task, master a skill, learn something new, and you get a physical token of your achievement to display on a sash. I wish I was still earning badges for things like getting [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Limited Time Only!

Get 50% off Digital Gifts

Hurry sale ends 12/31 >

X

Email this Article

X