ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "molecular biology"

Guest Blog

How Overeating May Contribute to a Metabolic “Traffic Jam”

Oooh, donut! (Mark H. Anbinder/Flickr)

In what has been dubbed “The Great Crawl of China”, in August 2010 commuters in Beijing accumulated along a 74.5-mile-long stretch of road for a preposterous 11 days straight. No mere rush-hour delay, the absurdity of this pile-up—one of the worst in recorded history—suggests that multiple factors were to blame. Just as fewer cars and [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

The Hallmarks of Cancer 9: Reprogramming Energy Metabolism

Cancer cells consume more glucose than normal cells. This is exploited when imaging cancer. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combined with Computer Tomography (PET/CT) is used to detect the absorption of the glucose analogue fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) by tumours. In this image, besides the normal accumulation of the FDG molecule in the heart, bladder, kidneys, and brain, liver metastases of a colorectal tumor are visible in the abdominal region. (Image credit: Jens Maus, Wikimedia Commons)

The Hallmarks of Cancer are ten underlying principles shared by all cancers. You can read the first eight Hallmarks of Cancer articles here. The ninth Hallmark of Cancer is defined as “Reprogramming Energy Metabolism”. Uncontrolled growth defines cancer. Growth requires a cancer’s cells to replicate all of their cellular components; their DNA, RNA, proteins and [...]

Keep reading »
Life, Unbounded

Notes From The Frontier: Life’s Origins

(Credit: Wikipedia/Swollib)

I spent some of last week at a fascinating and lively symposium on the origins of life and the search for life in the universe, held at the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. To say that the science under discussion was broad in scope would be the understatement of the [...]

Keep reading »
Life, Unbounded

Your Grandmother Was A Molecule

70s_atrna

Well, perhaps your great-to-the-hundred-millionth-grandmother was. Understanding the origins of life and the mechanics of the earliest beginnings of life is as important for the quest to unravel the Earth’s biological history as it is for the quest to seek out other life in the universe. We’re pretty confident that single-celled organisms – bacteria and archaea [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

Using Light to Monitor and Activate Specific Brain Cells

Artist's rendering of a spatial light modulator fires precise beams of laser light at neurons targeted by researchers, triggering those neurons to fire. (Courtesy of Hausser Lab/UCL)

The past several years have brought two parallel revolutions in neuroscience. Researchers have begun using genetically encoded sensors to monitor the behavior of individual neurons, and they’ve been using brief pulses of light to trigger certain types of neurons to activate. These two techniques are known collectively as optogenetics—the science of using light to read [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Scientific American Mind Digital

Get 6 bi-monthly digital issues
+ 1yr of archive access for just $9.99

Hurry this offer ends soon! >

X

Email this Article

X