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Posts Tagged "India"

Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selections: More on Syphilis, Education in India, and Classifying Things in Archaeology

Part of my online life includes editorial duties at ResearchBlogging.org, where I serve as the Social Sciences Editor. Each Thursday, I pick notable posts on research in anthropology, philosophy, social science, and research to share on the ResearchBlogging.org News site. To help highlight this writing, I also share my selections here on AiP. This week [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Indian Vultures Are Dying for Some Good News

white rumped vulture

When a species experiences catastrophic population declines as high as 99.9 percent, any bit of good news is cause for celebration—even if the news isn’t exactly great. India’s vultures now have some. The birds were almost completely wiped out by a veterinary drug called diclofenac, but a new study finds that the number of deaths [...]

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Extinction Countdown

3 New Species of Weird, Endangered Fish Discovered in India, U.S and Colombia

Kryptoglanis shajii

“It’s a strange world. Let’s keep it that way.”—Warren Ellis You can find some pretty weird things when you go poking around in holes in remote parts of the globe. The past month brought three examples of that rule of thumb as scientists announced the discovery of three extremely strange and endangered new fish species. [...]

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Extinction Countdown

14 New Species of Endangered “Dancing” Frogs Discovered in India [Video]

dancing frog

Say “Hello, my baby. Hello, my darling…” to 14 newly described frog species that kick and dance like Michigan J. Frog from the classic Warner Brothers animated cartoon, One Froggy Evening. These “dancing” frogs don’t sing, however—the males of these various species all kick and stretch their legs to their sides as a visual cue [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Forest Owlet

forest owlet

Scientific fraud almost led to this tiny owl’s extinction. Species name: Forest owlet (Heteroglaux blewitti). Known locally as dongar dudaa. Where found: About a dozen locations in the forests of central India. The small, stocky bird species went unseen by scientists from 1884 until its rediscovery in 1997, mostly because of a scientific fraud in [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Century-Old Egg Answers Mystery about Critically Endangered Bird

jerdon's courer egg

Few people have ever seen a Jerdon’s courser (Rhinoptilus bitorquatus), a critically endangered nocturnal bird that lives in a tiny scrub forest in southeastern India. And until recently it was thought that no one had ever seen a Jerdon’s courser nest or egg. But it turns out that a single egg from one of these [...]

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Extinction Countdown

What Do Tigers and Kiwi Have in Common? The Answer Lies in Their Genes

bengal tiger

At first (and probably second) glance you wouldn’t think that tigers and kiwis have all that much in common. Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) live in India and the surrounding countries, where the predators can weigh more than 220 kilograms. Little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii) live exclusively in New Zealand, where the flightless birds weigh [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Who Will Save the Last Hoolock Gibbons? [Video]

western hoolock gibbon male

Primates that spend their entire lives in trees tend not to survive after those trees are cut down. Sadly, that’s what’s happening in northeast India, where the forest habitats for one of the world’s rarest apes are rapidly disappearing. The western hoolock gibbon (Hoolock hoolock) has lost an estimated 90 percent of its population over [...]

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Extinction Countdown

‘Extinct’ Indian Gecko Rediscovered After 135 Years

Geckoella jeyporensis

In 1877 a British lieutenant colonel and naturalist named R.H. Beddome looked under a rock in the Indian state of Orissa and discovered a new gecko species. That was the last time it was ever seen. Until now. After more than 135 years, the Jeypore ground gecko (Geckoella Jeyporensis) has been rediscovered by a team [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Rhino Poaching: An Extinction Crisis

white rhinoceros

In 2010 a black rhinoceros female named Phila survived two separate and brutal attempts on her life. In the first, poachers used a helicopter to attack the private game reserve where she lived in South Africa. Another rhino died in the assault. Phila escaped with two gunshot wounds. She was lucky, but her ordeal was [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Updates from the Brink: Dying Devils, Disappearing Vultures and a $473,000 Fish

When I last wrote about Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) this past December, the species was in pretty dire straits. A contagious cancer known as Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD) had, at that point, wiped out at least 70 percent of devils in the wild, forcing scientists to resort to captive breeding, a sperm bank and [...]

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Guest Blog

Engineering Is a Man’s Field: Changing a Stereotype with a Lesson from India

Among rude people, the women are generally degraded; among civilized people they are exalted. —James Mill, The History of British India Two years back, we were putting together a report on the employability (job-readiness) of engineering students in India based on the results of AMCAT, a job-skills test my company and I developed (Aspiring Minds [...]

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Observations

Solar Power Helped Keep the Lights On in India

india-overloaded-grid

Every day, at least 400 million Indians lack access to electricity. Another nearly 700 million Indians joined their fellows in energy poverty over the course of the last few days, or roughly 10 percent of the world’s population. Oddly enough, some of the formerly energy poor—rural villagers throughout the subcontinent—found themselves better off than their [...]

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Observations

India’s City Dwellers at Greater Risk Than Americans for Heart Disease

india city heart disease risk

Diabetes, heart disease, stroke and other afflictions that once primarily plagued wealthier, western countries are now accelerating in poorer nations. A new study reveals that risk factors for heart disease in Indian cities are now more prevalent than they are in the U.S. or Western Europe per capita. And with a population of more than [...]

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Observations

Drug-resistant genes found in cholera and dysentery strains in New Delhi water supply

drinking water dnm-1 antibiotic resistant bacteria gene in cholera and dysentery

Poor sanitation can foster transmission of all sorts of nasty bacterial bugs. But a new study has found that among common bacteria, antibiotic resistance is brewing in the New Delhi water supply—and spreading in at least 20 strains, including some that cause dysentery and cholera. Genetic adaptations that help bacteria combat pharmaceutical assaults give strains [...]

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Observations

Obama and (climate) change: Indian edition

The U.S. launched this week a historic program to advance clean energy in India—where simply moving the 40 percent of the South Asian nation’s citizens who still burn coal, dung or wood to electricity could deliver major improvements for development, clean air and climate. Last week, it was a similar historic program to advance clean [...]

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Plugged In

Map Monday: 50+ Shades of Air Pollution

One-fourth of the world is breathing unsafe air. Courtesy of Hsu et al/The Atlantic

In today’s installment of Map Monday, I wanted to focus on air pollution as mapped by Hsu et al and The Atlantic. Go to this link to see the full interactive map, which details air pollution by country and city. Below, I have copied in a global snapshot with some perhaps unsurprising shades of pollution [...]

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PsiVid

More EXPOSED: The Global Epidemic of TB

Mumbai Physician with his mHealth device to assist with drug compliance in TB patients

A few weeks back, I shared with you of the first episode of a series of videos about the persistent and rising problem of the global epidemic of TB. Since then, the three final episodes have been released. In February, I was in India with the International Reporting Project to look at Issues of Child [...]

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PsiVid

India is Drowning in its Own Excreta-Can Science and Engineering Come to the Rescue?

3 puppies resting in the shade cast by 50 gallon water drums

Just a few weeks ago, I flew into India to join other new media specialists and journalists with the International Reporting Project to examine issues of child survival and health. (Before I continue, I simply must extend thanks to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for providing a portion of the IRP funding to make [...]

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PsiVid

A Visit to an India Full of Science and Engineering

I am writing this to you from New Delhi, India as I am here with the International Reporting Project as a New Media Specialist! We have been in the crowded, bustling, port city of Mumbai, the central city of Nagpur (home of several tiger refuges), the rural village area of Gadchiroli, and finally to the [...]

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PsiVid

India Trip to Examine Issues in Child Survival: How Science and Engineering Help

Back in October, I opened my email to find an interesting invitation for me to apply for a trip to India as part of a special International Reporting Project bloggers’ trip focusing on child survival and related issues of health and development. The trip described in full “The trip will focus on issues of child [...]

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