ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "HIV"

Bering in Mind

The Opposite of “Protection”: A Fetish for Used Condoms

Using condoms is a good thing. Using used condoms, well, not so much. In a 2009 article published in Sexually Transmitted Infections, the British medical author Vincent Tremayne explains the fetish for prophylatics. Now, not all manifestations are particularly problematic. “For someone with a condom fetish,” Tremayne explains, “this might mean gaining pleasure from [merely] [...]

Keep reading »
Bering in Mind

Is male circumcision a humanitarian act?

So there’s this fellow—an inquisitive sort, even if not particularly bright—whom one day is asked by his ogress of a wife to drive to the store to buy a ham. Obediently, he does so, finds an impressive specimen of meat at the store, returns home and, grinning widely, places it proudly on the kitchen table [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Beyond medicine: Delivering on the promise of food security in the context of the AIDS epidemic

Facilitating HIV prevention, care, and treatment through dance and drama, TASO, Kampala. Photo Credit: Terrance Roopnaraine

The relationship between HIV/AIDS and food security is incredibly complex. For this guest post, I invited two experts on this issue to share their knowledge, insight, and experience. I’m delighted to introduce the article’s two authors. Suneetha Kadiyala is a Senior Lecturer in nutrition-sensitive development at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), in [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

In Africa, Climate Change Wages War on Bodies, Not Just Lands

Dr. Kassahun Desalegn and patient

While the African Union concentrates on strategies to mitigate the devastating financial effects climate change is having on Africans, I worry instead about its impact on our bodies. As a doctor working in my native Ethiopia, I see the results of our warming planet, not just in the dry earth or the torrential skies, but [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Trials Bolster Case for Preemptive Use of HIV Drugs to Reduce Transmission Rates

Cross-posted from Nature Medicine‘s Spoonful of Medicine blog Results from two trials released today provide the first evidence that taking antiretroviral drugs can prevent HIV infection among heterosexual men and women. The preventative strategy, known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), was first shown to be effective among gay men. But PrEP suffered a setback in April [...]

Keep reading »
Molecules to Medicine

Over-the-counter OraQuick HIV test: What does this mean for you?

The FDA has just announced approval for the OraQuick In-Home HIV test, by OraSure Technologies. That’s great news on some fronts, but the test raises new questions, as well. As I’ve just been catching up on my vacation reading with Marya Zilberberg’s helpful new book, “Between the Lines,” the first thing that caught my eye [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

The Quest: 6 Facts about Aging and Aging Research

Fact #1: With about $2.5 billion in annual funding, aging research is in the top 20 research categories supported by the National Institutes of Health.* That gives me another opportunity to test my contention that taking a couple of seconds to think about where to start searching for medical information instead of automatically calling up [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

The Quest: $84,000 Miracle Cure Costs Less Than $150 to Make

What are the likely manufacturing costs for sofosbuvir (Brand name: Sovaldi), the newly approved miracle drug that cures hepatitis C at a cost of $84,000 for the full 12-week course of treatment? Anywhere from $68 to $136 for the full course, according to an analysis that was published in Clinical Infectious Disease (CID) in January—which was [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Supreme Court Strikes Down Anti-Prostitution Pledge Tied to Global AIDS Funding

supreme-court-breast-cancer

The Supreme Court today struck down a federal requirement that forced private health organizations to denounce prostitution in order to get funding for programs aimed at preventing or treating HIV/AIDS. The decision marks a major victory for human rights and global health advocates who charged that the requirement was a U.S. government overreach that blocked [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Pediatricians Group Praises Benefits of Circumcision for Male Infants

benefits male newborn circumcision

Evidence for the long-term health benefits of circumcision for newborn boys has been mounting for years. Today the influential group the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) declared that the procedure is, indeed, beneficial—and that it should be covered by public and private health insurance plans. The recommendation was published online August 27 in Pediatrics. Previously [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

How Computers Could Reduce the Spread of HIV

computer model spread hiv prevention program

Condom use, earlier treatment and increased education have gone a long way to reducing HIV spread in the U.S. Nonetheless, some 4,000 inhabitants of New York City still became infected with HIV in 2009. Injection drug users make up a small portion of the new infections (just over 4 percent in NYC, and about 9 percent [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

The Most Exciting Moment of My Scientific Career

HIV,AIDS, Africa

Thumbi Ndung’u left Kenya 1995 to study medicine at Harvard. He later returned to Africa on a mission to exploit HIV’s vulnerabilities. Now the head of the HIV Pathogenesis Program at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, Ndung’u spoke with Scientific American contributor Brendan Borrell about a research breakthrough early in his career that [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Hepatitis C Now Killing More Americans Than HIV

doctor and patient diagnosis

The number of people who die from HIV-related causes each year in the U.S. is now down to about 12,700—from a peak of more than 50,000 in the mid-1990s—thanks to condom education and distribution campaigns, increased testing and improved treatments. But now a different infectious disease is quietly killing even more people than HIV is: [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

World AIDS Day Marks Progress Toward Prevention

world aids day 2010 december 1 globe with aids awareness ribbon

Wednesday marks the 22nd annual World AIDS Day. In the past year several scientific advances have helped rekindle convictions that progress is being made against the spread of HIV and AIDS. Last week researchers presented findings in The New England Journal of Medicine that prophylactic antiretrovirals—along with counseling and other prevention services—reduced HIV infection rates [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Perpetrators of HIV crimes uncovered through “evolutionary forensics”

hiv phylogenetic analysis can show transmission path

DNA evidence has been used to link suspects to crime scenes and even to people they might have infected with HIV. Now, using tools from evolutionary biology, researchers have shown that they can establish the direction of transmission of HIV in criminal cases involving men who intentionally infected women partners during unprotected sex. A new [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

What does HIV sound like? [Audio]

sounds of hiv dna music album

There is no question that HIV is an ugly virus in terms of human health. Each year, it infects some 2.7 million additional people and leads to some two million deaths from AIDS. But a new album manages to locate some sonic beauty deep in its genome. Sounds of HIV (Azica Records) by composer Alexandra [...]

Keep reading »
PsiVid

OTC HIV Testing Kit Hits Shelves in the US

OTC testing kit for HIV

World AIDS Day is approaching on December 1. As I was looking up more about World AIDS Day and awareness and testing guidelines/suggestions, I discovered there are several other similar days for awareness including National HIV Testing Day (NHTD), June 27, an annual observance to promote HIV testing. There are also days set aside for [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

You’ve never really seen a virus until you see this

13-011FEATURE

Artist Luke Jerram is a UK-based sculptor whose glass sculptures of microscopic life make the invisible visible. I was instantly transfixed by his sculptures’ delicacy and intense beauty. For me, something is captured in these sculptures that is lost in the false-color scanning electron microscope images we typically see of viruses and other extremely small [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Dinosaurs

Get Total Access to our Digital Anthology

1,200 Articles

Order Now - Just $39! >

X

Email this Article

X