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Posts Tagged "healthcare"

Anthropology in Practice

Standards of Healthcare in Your Medicine Cabinet

What story would your medicine cabinet tell about you? Medicine cabinets are amazing spaces. They can contain a multitude of pills, pastes, syrups, and wrappings that we know we can reach for to manage many types of pain, ailments, and illnesses ourselves. They can provide a window into a person’s well-being—really? you’ve never peeked after [...]

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Guest Blog

Mandatory Shots: Should Hospitals Force Health Care Workers to Get the Flu Vaccine?

A growing number of U.S. hospitals now compel health care workers to get vaccinated against the flu and other infectious diseases to protect patients from communicable diseases. In the case of the flu, the need is obvious: hospitalized patients who become infected have an elevated risk of developing complications or dying. Yet the vaccination requirement [...]

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Guest Blog

How Clinical Guidelines Can Fail Both Doctors and Patients

A physician holds a stethoscope.

Any confusion over the recent news of cholesterol guidelines in the U.S. is perfectly understandable. On the one hand, the guidelines suggest that nearly half the population should use statins to stave off heart attacks and strokes. On the other, use of the drugs is not with potential side effects and, to many, will offer [...]

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Guest Blog

Caring for the Patient When the Patient Doesn’t Care

Homeless man in Los Angeles, CA

In medical school, we learn that our job is to help our patients. This point seems so obvious that we take it for granted; we tell ourselves that this is the purpose served by the endless hours in the library and late nights on the wards. In the abstract, it seems like a simple concept. [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

Hospital merger déjà vu

For past decades I’ve vacationed in mid-coast Maine, an enjoyable respite from sweltering Washington, D.C. weather. When I returned to Boothbay Harbor last week, I was dismayed to learn that local St. Andrews hospital will be closing its emergency room, part of its merger with Miles Hospital in Damariscotta, 20 miles away. While I have [...]

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Observations

Socioeconomic Gender Gap Is Closing Worldwide, but Far from Eliminated

An image promoting gender equality, a man and woman holding hands, in Denmark

The world’s gender gap along economic, political and other social dimensions continues to narrow, according to a new report released by the World Economic Forum, but lack of equality for women remains a major roadblock in most countries, including the U.S. The report quantified how close countries have come to gender parity and shows improvement [...]

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Observations

U.S. Falls Short in New Measure of Human Capital

A female worker adding protective coverings to new Pinot Noir plantings

Businesses in Switzerland, Finland and Singapore milk the most economic value out of their workers—and the U.S. lags pretty far behind them. According to the World Economic Forum’s new Human Capital Index, in which researchers attempt to quantify the factors that help a country unlock the capabilities of its workforce, the U.S. has a lot [...]

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Observations

Newer Docs Might Be Driving Up Health Care Costs

doctor experience health care cost

Health care spending increases have slowed over the past couple years. Still, we are spending some $2.6 trillion—that’s trillion with a “T”—a year on health costs, which is a higher percentage of our GDP than any other developed country. And we don’t seem to be getting that much healthier. So economists and policy researchers are [...]

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Observations

Electronic Sensors That Dissolve Could Keep Tabs on the Body from the Inside [Video]

Most people appreciate electronics that are durable and can last for years before needing to be replaced. If the device in question is a medical implant or a sensor for monitoring environmental conditions, however, designers might prefer the gadget to simply biodegrade without a trace once its purpose is fulfilled. University of Illinois researchers, working [...]

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Observations

What’s the Price of Climate Change? $14 Billion in Lost Lives and Health Care

2003-southern-california-wildfires

Flood, famine, fire and disease—climate change is expected to have an impact on all of these threats, by altering the earth in many ways, from changes in the planet’s water cycle to making a broader swath of the planet amenable to insect-born illnesses such as malaria. A new study in the November issue of Health [...]

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Observations

Cost of cancer care projected to jump nearly 40 percent by 2020

cost of cancer treatment projected to rise in next decade

Thanks to medical advances in recent decades, many millions more people are surviving for years beyond a cancer diagnosis. These leaps, however, have not come cheap. And with an aging population and expected rising costs in medical care, the financial burden of cancer is expected to rise precipitously in the next 10 years—despite decreasing incidence—according [...]

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PsiVid

India Trip to Examine Issues in Child Survival: How Science and Engineering Help

Back in October, I opened my email to find an interesting invitation for me to apply for a trip to India as part of a special International Reporting Project bloggers’ trip focusing on child survival and related issues of health and development. The trip described in full “The trip will focus on issues of child [...]

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