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Unlocking the Secrets of the Inner Earth: The Deep Carbon Observatory

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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We are all well aware of the immense role that carbon plays in our lives. However, have you ever thought about the immense reservoir of carbon that exists deep beneath the earth’s surface? The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) is a group of scientists with members spanning the globe, who’s ultimate aim is to unlock the mysteries of the carbon stores in the inner earth. In their own words:

The Deep Carbon Observatory is a global research program to transform our understanding of carbon in Earth. At its heart, DCO is a community of scientists, from biologists to physicists, geoscientists to chemists, and many others whose work crosses these disciplinary lines, forging a new, integrative field of deep carbon science. To complement this groundbreaking research, the DCO’s infrastructure includes public engagement and education, online and offline community support, innovative data management, and novel instrumentation.

Today they released a short film based on their work, a collaborative effort with Smithsonian Media. It’s an extremely well produced piece that gives a clear idea of the focus and scope of the project. The animations and pacing are excellent, and the narration gives it a real ‘Hollywood’ feel. The film certainly piques my interest about the project. How about you?

Carin Bondar About the Author: Carin Bondar is a biologist, writer and film-maker with a PhD in population ecology from the University of British Columbia. Find Dr. Bondar online at www.carinbondar.com, on twitter @drbondar or on her facebook page: Dr. Carin Bondar – Biologist With a Twist. Follow on Twitter @drbondar.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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