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Get Your “Awwws” and “Squeees” Here! Wild Sea Otter Cam Delights


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Most everyone who follows me on social media is aware I have a weakness for two animals: otters and sloths. I’m happy to promote efforts that encourage conservation and well being of these animals. Good news, if you ever desire to infuse your day with adorableness, you can now watch otters in the wild, for fun, education, and your daily dose of “awww” and “squeee”, thanks to a webcam at Elkhorn Slough.

Watch this mom and her pup at Elkhorn slough

Here’s mom having a bit more trouble with her feisty pup!

These videos come courtesy of the wildlife cam

From the Elkhorn Slough webcam website:

With counts exceeding 100 animals, Elkhorn Slough has the highest concentration of southern sea otters on the California coast. It is in this estuary habitat that researchers have observed sea otter behavior not seen in other sea otter populations. The Elkhorn Slough Otter Cam is a joint program of Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Elkhorn Slough Foundation and Friends of the Sea Otter that allows the public to view sea otters in the sheltered channels of the Elkhorn Slough.

Otter 501 and her pup. Image courtesy of Robert Skoals

Watch these live wild otters HERE

Speaking of otters on camera, last year, I watched and reviewed the movie, “Saving Otter 501″. I am so pleased to announce that “Saving Otter 501″ will be PBS’ Nature premiere on October 16th. Little baby Otter 501 was rescued from the Monterey Bay area and the movie shows her being raised and trained to be released back into the wild by the staff and a surrogate mother otter at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Be certain to tune in especially if you missed any of the previous screenings of the movie.

Since I wrote about Otter 501, she has become a mom! It is so encouraging to see her successful re-introduction into the wild after a rough start. Congratulations, Otter 501! And congratulations, Seaotters.com for your successful campaign along with all of your partners who work to keep these precious animals in the front of our minds as they still need our protection and assistance.

Joanne Manaster About the Author: Joanne Manaster is a university level cell and molecular biology lecturer with an insatiable passion for science outreach to all ages. Enjoy her quirky videos at www.joannelovesscience.com, on twitter @sciencegoddess and on her Facebook page at JoanneLovesScience Follow on Twitter @sciencegoddess.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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