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MAVEN Orbiter Preparation at NASA Considered “Emergency Exception”–Work Continues Despite Government Shutdown


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With only 3% of NASA employees currently at work during the government shutdown, the status of continuing work for the upcoming MAVEN orbiter launching to Mars to analyze the Martian atmosphere mid-November has been uncertain. Luckily it seems they’ve been quite industrious this past month in preparation:

The MAVEN spacecraft is shown in this time-lapse video during its Assembly, Test, and Launch Operations (ATLO) phase. MAVEN began ATLO procedures on Sept. 11, 2012 and was shipped to Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility on Aug. 2, 2013 to begin preparations for its scheduled launch on Nov. 18, 2013.

Now for the update. Bruce Jakosky, Principle Investigator on the project has released this announcement:

“Let me tell you the current status of MAVEN. I learned this morning that NASA has analyzed the MAVEN mission relative to the Anti-Deficiency Act and determined that it meets the requirements allowing an emergency exception.

MAVEN is required as a communications relay in order to be assured of continued communications with the Curiosity and Opportunity rovers. The rovers are presently supported by Mars Odyssey launched in 2001 and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter launched in 2005. Launching MAVEN in 2013 protects the existing assets that are at Mars today.

A delay in the launch date by more than a week past the end of the nominal launch period, or a delay of launch to 2016, would require additional fuel to get into orbit. This would have precluded having sufficient fuel for MAVEN to carry out its science mission and to operate as a relay for any significant time. Our nominal launch period runs from 18 November through 7 December, and we can launch as late as about 15 December without a significant impact on our combined science and relay activities. There is no NASA relay orbiter planned post-MAVEN.

Although the exception for MAVEN is not being done for science reasons, the science of MAVEN clearly will benefit from this action. Launching in 2013 allows us to observe at a good time in the eleven-year solar cycle.

We have already restarted spacecraft processing at Kennedy Space Center, working toward being ready to launch on Nov. 18. We will continue to work over the next couple of days to identify any changes in our schedule or plans that are necessary to stay on track.”

I for one am relieved because I have my travel plans all made to attend the launch, though am awaiting my official invite document. It seems I will have to wait a little bit more until NASA employees can return to work.

Joanne Manaster About the Author: Joanne Manaster is a university level cell and molecular biology lecturer with an insatiable passion for science outreach to all ages. Enjoy her quirky videos at www.joannelovesscience.com, on twitter @sciencegoddess and on her Facebook page at JoanneLovesScience Follow on Twitter @sciencegoddess.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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  1. 1. aakriti90feb 7:39 am 10/29/2013

    But it is alright now, see the link, NASA agains gears up for this mission.
    http://www.themoneytimes.com/featured/20131029/nasa-gears-maven-mission-probe-martian-atmosphere-id-1701713674.html

    Link to this

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