ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "Science Communication"

Absolutely Maybe

Teenage Mutant Ninja Journal! Celebrating an Open Access Birthday

Cartoon Teenage Mutant Ninja Journal

“The world of medical journals needs a fresh infusion of idealism.” And with those words from PLOS founders, Mike Eisen, Pat Brown, and Harold Varmus, the first issue of PLOS Medicine launched 10 years ago today. Its “mutant” superpower was being open access. Then – as now – it was bold, idealistic, and an active [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

5 Shortcuts to Keep Data on Risks in Perspective

Cartoon in Heaven's Department of Epidemiology

“Risky” is definitely not a one-size-fits-all concept. It’s not just that we aren’t all at the same level of every risk. Our tolerance of risk-taking in different situations can be wildly different, too. Our judgments about our own vulnerability and how we feel about what we might gain or lose can make a risk loom [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Blink! This Contact Lens Post Could Make Your Eyes Water

Cartoon of rose-colored glasses for reading about contact lens risks

He would dab on a bit of cocaine to anesthetize his eyes first. Then, to prevent air getting in, Müller would insert the lenses with his eyes under water. And they would help his myopia … for about half an hour. Wearing them much longer was intolerable. It was 1889 and August Müller was a 25-year-old [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Science: Add Humor and Stir – Wocka, Wocka, Wocka!

Cartoon of Angus doing stand-up PhD Defense

Laughter can be a joyous shortcut between people. It’s relaxing, and a playful way to engage our minds. Science, on the other hand, can be tough to explain and digest. Traditional methods can be hard-going. So many of us reach for humor when we talk science. Comedy makes things accessible. Except, of course, when it [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Is a Baby Aspirin a Day the New Apple?

Cartoon of a shelf of aspirin

His first big clue came when people started hemorrhaging after chewing gum. Lawrence Craven did tonsil and adenoid surgery in his office. And it usually went well. But in the mid-1940s, “an alarming number of hemorrhages were evidenced in disturbing frequency,” he said. He figured it was the aspirin chewing gum people were using for [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Resveratrol Hangover: Waking Up After Hypothesis Bingeing

Cartoon of a tottering house of cards

Outbreaks of science myth-busting can be a bit of a puzzlement. The science behind a popular headline-maker might be a tottering house of cards, but it can be impressively sturdy nevertheless. New studies might re-arrange it a little here or there, but it doesn’t usually topple. Only those studies that reinforce the narrative seem to [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Vacation: What’s the Point?

Cartoon - what did you do on vacation? Went cherry-picking

It’s not really news when a journalist goes cherry-picking for juicy tidbits to fit a narrative, is it? We all fall into the trap of going too easy on the things we want to believe. So what is it about a piece about vacations in Vox that got me rushing to the keyboard? Science journalist [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Science in the Abstract: Don’t Judge a Study by its Cover

Cartoon in a lab - You said to do an abstract

A competition for attention lies at the heart of the scientific enterprise. And the abstract is its “blurb.” A scientific abstract is a summary used to attract readers to an article and to get a piece of research accepted for a conference presentation. Other than the title, it’s the part of an article that is [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

The Disease Prevention Illusion: A Tragedy in Five Parts

Cartoon of an early bird catching no worms

Act I: An ounce of “prevention.” “Prevention is better than cure.” Aphorisms like this go back a long way. And most of our dramatic triumphs against disease come from prevention: clean water, making roads and workplaces safer, antiseptic routines in hospital, reducing smoking, immunization, stemming the spread of HIV. Many of our cultural superstitions and greatest [...]

Keep reading »
Absolutely Maybe

Open access 2013: A year of gaining momentum

Cartoon of old school closed science library

Was this the year open access for science reached critical mass? One hypothesis suggests that a transformative group needs to reach one-third to be prominent and persisting. Rogers’ theory on the diffusion of innovations that will eventually reach saturation level says the first 2.5% are innovators. By the time you get to 16% the phase [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

#NYCSciTweetUp is Coming!

What are you doing next Thursday? I’ll tell you what—if you live in the New York City area, you’re going to the #NYCSciTweetUp! Join the gang on March 29th, at the Peculier Pub in NYC for an informal evening of science and networking.. Updated details can always be found on the Facebook page. And as per [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Making, Education, and Innovation: Inspiring Makers in Underrepresented Communities

Maker Faire invites young Makers to enter a world of innovation and imagination. If you can dream it, you can build it—particularly as experienced Makers are on-hand and willing to share what they know. How can we better encourage a broader participation in this science and technology showcase by underrepresented groups—beginning in the very neighborhood [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

#NYCSciTweetUp Follow-Up

The third #NYCSciTweetUp was a huge success! Thanks to all who came out to The Peculier Pub. It was a pleasure seeing so many new faces mingling with familiar ones! What is the tweetup, you ask? It’s an informal monthly (or so) gathering for the science community in New York City. As Story Collider‘s Ben [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Interested in Science? Come to the #NYCSciTweetUp on Aug. 9th

Every month or so, the science community in New York City gathers to talk science over beer. The event—or TweetUp if you will—began as a means of connecting the online science community offline, which is why it bears a hashtag in its name. While the gathering is still in its infancy, turnouts have been fairly [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Are We Hoarding Connections?

AiP_icon200

Ed Note: This article is from the Anthropology in Practice archives, and was originally posted on August 24th, 2010. I’ve elected to repost it given the introduction of the Google+, which offers (necessitates?) a new means to connect. Incidentally, if you would like connect with me on G+, you can find me at gplus.to/krystaldcosta. Facebook [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Picturing Science: Secrets of the Museum Revealed

To the public, museums are mysterious, magical places. Science, history, and context are carefully preserved and displayed—though the guy-wires are carefully hidden so as to not disturb the experience of the visitor. The work that goes into constructing the fancy dioramas and exhibits, the science that helps construct the scenes that we view as visitors [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

Facebook’s “I F*cking Love Science” does not f*cking love artists

IFLS_copyright

Elise Andrew runs the most popular Science page on facebook. I know so, because I see her content reshared dozens of times daily in my news feed. Well, it’s not really her content, but I’ll get back to that in a minute. The point is, I F*cking Love Science is big. By posting photos, cartoons, news [...]

Keep reading »
Compound Eye

The Art of the Science Caption

Haploembia2f

I am not going to tell you what this animal is. At least, not yet. Instead, I’d like to use the absence of a caption to mention the importance of accompanying science images with the right text. Why? Artists and photographers spend enough time crafting images that it’d be a waste to lose potential viewers [...]

Keep reading »
Cross-Check

Ebola “Fear Mongering” Critiqued by Medical Anthropologist

Newsweek cover story on Ebola is "horrible and racist," says medical anthropologist Theresa MacPhail.

A new semester has just started at Stevens Institute of Technology, and I’m more excited than usual—that is, less depressed that summer vacation is over. My division, the College of Arts & Letters, just hired two scholars to beef up our programs in Science and Technology Studies and Science Communication. One is historian of science [...]

Keep reading »
Doing Good Science

More on rudeness, civility, and the care and feeding of online conversations.

composite-square-01

Late last month, I pondered the implications of a piece of research that was mentioned but not described in detail in a perspective piece in the January 4, 2013 issue of Science. [1] In its broad details, the research suggests that the comments that follow an online article about science — and particularly the perceived [...]

Keep reading »
Doing Good Science

Academic tone-trolling: How does interactivity impact online science communication?

composite-square-02

Later this week at ScienceOnline 2013, Emily Willingham and I are co-moderating a session called Dialogue or fight? (Un)moderated science communication online. Here’s the description: Cultivating a space where commentators can vigorously disagree with a writer–whether on a blog, Twitter, G+, or Facebook, *and* remain committed to being in a real dialogue is pretty challenging. [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Science Education and Changing People’s Minds: Writing to convince

I find online science communication fascinating. I am enthusiastic about its possibilities and intrigued by its challenges. With an interest in online communication, comes an interest in text. While videos, animations and images are powerful too, the written word is often the simplest and the default mode of online communication–-think blog posts, tweets, status updates, [...]

Keep reading »
Image of the Week

Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

DarrenNaishVaranidFEATURE

Artist: Darren Naish Source: Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on… it’s about monitor lizards, by Darren Naish on Tetrapod Zoology If you’re not a herpetologist, you may be of the mindset that lizards all look the same, but that would only expose you for what you are: a human primate, finely attuned to the faces [...]

Keep reading »
Not bad science

Unique Science Communication: Isabella Rossellini

hqdefault

I recently wrote an article about science communication, and in it mentioned that people can communicate science in many different ways using many different types of media. One more unusual way is what Isabella Rossellini has adopted. Using real animal behaviour science, she conveys it by dressing up as the animal in question, and presenting [...]

Keep reading »
Not bad science

How To Get Into Science Communication Online

pic1

I recently taught a class on science journalism and science communication. Although there have been a few articles on this topic already (in particular I’d recommend reading Ed Yong’s and Carl Zimmer’s) I thought I’d share a bit of advice from my own experience. I became involved in science writing just a few years ago, [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

On the Origin of White Power

KKK square

A new book argues race and genetics explain “the rise of the West.” Bad science explains the downfall of its ideas. Nicholas Wade is not a racist. In his new book, A Troublesome Inheritance, the former science writer for the New York Times states this explicitly. “It is not automatically racist to consider racial categories [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

The Allure of Gay Cavemen

"Cave Painting" by Nathaniel Gold

Third genders, two spirits, and a media without a clue. Author’s Note: Earlier this month the UK Daily Mail reported on continued excavation at an archaeological site near Prague where researchers described an individual with an alternative gender identity. The following post originally appeared at Neuron Culture hosted by Wired after the original report last [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Apes in the Suites and the Streets: Participatory Organizing from #Scio12 to #OccupyWallStreet

"@BoraChimp" by Nathaniel Gold

Conferences are social grooming events for relatively hairless apes. A few will stand before the multitude, beaming with pride or shaking with nervousness (as the case may be), and present the latest research in contemporary ape thought. As their vocalizations reach a crescendo, those sitting demurely below will produce flesh-slapping noises that indicate they were [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

The Uses of the Past: Why Science Writers Should Care About the History of Science – And Why Scientists Should Too

"The Anatomy Lesson of Homo sylvestris" by Nathaniel Gold

Whether we are exploring our family genealogy or the genetic tree of our primate ancestors, all of us have a common yearning to know from whence we came. Origin stories captivate our imagination and offer a narrative structure for better understanding where we are today. The reality is that a knowledge of the history of [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Probing the Passions of Science: Carl Zimmer Delves Beneath the Surface of Science Writing

Zimmer Square.jpg

Click here for Part One: Carl Zimmer on the Art of Science Writing Carl Zimmer has an uncanny knack for getting under your skin, quite literally. While travelling through the village of Tumbura in southern Sudan he encountered invisible monsters that live inside the subcutaneous tissue of their innocent victims. Under a microscope these creatures, [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Probing the Passions of Science: An Interview with Carl Zimmer on the Art of Science Writing

Zimmer Square.jpg

Click here for Part Two: Carl Zimmer Delves Beneath the Surface of Science Writing Carl Zimmer is one of the most insightful and trenchant science writers working today. Whether he is delving into the soul of the scientific revolution or exposing the precise horror of parasites to reveal our relationship with the natural world, he [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Male Chauvinist Chimps or the Meat Market of Public Opinion?

"Chimp with Monocle" by Nathaniel Gold

Author’s Note: The following originally appeared at Nature Network. It was subsequently selected as a PLoS ONE Pick of the Month, as a Finalist in the 2009 Quark Prize in Science and appeared in the 2009 edition of The Open Laboratory: The Best Science Writing on the Web (buy it here). You can still nominate entries for [...]

Keep reading »
The Primate Diaries

Frans de Waal on Political Apes, Science Communication, and Building a Cooperative Society

Frans de Waal by Nathaniel Gold

“It’s the animal in us,” we often hear when we’ve been bad. But why not when we’re good? This is the question that has driven Frans de Waal for the past 30 years. From his pioneering research on alliance formation in Chimpanzee Politics, to reconciliation behavior in Peacemaking Among Primates and Good Natured, to the [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Knowledge, Knowledge Everywhere: Do Social Networks Spread or Drown Health & Science News?

Southwell_Picture

We live in an age of constant data. Between television, the Internet, and  our “real-life” social circles, society has never before had as much access to health and science news as we now enjoy — and it has never been so easy for anyone to access an entire encyclopedia of information about any health or [...]

Keep reading »
Roots of Unity

Apply Now for an AAAS Mass Media Fellowship

The 2012 Mass Media Fellows at orientation in Washington, DC. Image: Jessica McDonald.

I started writing about math and science in June 2012 thanks to an AAAS Mass Media Fellowship sponsored by the American Mathematical Society. Every year, the fellowship provides opportunities for math and science graduate students to work for mass media outlets such as Scientific American (where I worked), NPR, the Chicago Tribune, and so on. [...]

Keep reading »
SA Visual

Don’t Just Visualize Data—Visceralize It

Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew (December 7, 1972). Image courtesy of NASA Johnson Space Center

The title of this post borrows from ideas presented by Sha Hwang at the Visualized conference in New York City several weeks ago: He kicked off the data-visualization event with a talk that—in effect—challenged the audience to take a step back. Way back. And then to look again, with fresh unblinking eyes. What does a [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

14-043FEATURE

For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Now That’s a Wee Little Infographic

shrews_J_Christiansen_mini

  53 million years old, and it may be the smallest mammal that has ever lived. Batodonoides vanhouteni was a shrew-like mammal that scientific illustrator Jen Christiansen has deftly described in this illustration. In addition to being an illustrator, Christiansen is also Scientific American’s art editor of information graphics. Composing an illustration with only a few, [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Portraits of Bonsai at the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens

14-038FEATURE

As I write this, the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens is preparing an exhibit showcasing the work of Dick Rauh, a botanical illustrator who has distinguished himself as a master of botanical illustration since he picked up a pen and paper in his retirement. In a show called “Patience, Paper, Pen and Brush,” the Gardens will be [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

In Case You’re Tempted to Think 3D Modeling All Looks the Same

14-037FEATURE

I initially contacted Bryan Christie to request permission to feature his spectacular cheetah illustration in this year’s blitz. He agreed, and so here it is, in all its glory: But he also tipped me off to his fine art work that is equally worthy of note: How could two such disparate styles emanate from the [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Mossy Drops of Water

14-033FEATURE

Mineo Mizuno is a sculptor whose fascination with water as a central part of our existence took him on a journey resulting in this stunning series of large-scale moss-covered ceramic discs. His desire to capture the nature of water – its luminous, almost spritely character – lead him to perfect the form of a flattened [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Who Illustrates the Murals at Museums?

14-032FEATURE

Have you ever wondered who illustrates the murals at our beloved museums, zoos, aquariums, and botanical gardens? Marjorie Leggitt is one such person. Based in Boulder, CO, she has spent her career illuminating science and natural processes through her art. This mural was made for the Denver Botanical Gardens in Denver, CO to illustrate the [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond

14-029FEATURE

The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Essential Social Media Sites for Science Illustrators

socialmediabuttons

During my recent talk at the AMI conference about social media and illustration, I skimmed this slide near the end. Talks were intended to be 20 minutes long and I don’t like to rehearse too much: I don’t read off of my slides so I tend to remind myself of the critical points and fret [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Heat Up This Summer

14-021FEATURE

Take a break from the heat this summer to step into some cool galleries exhibiting scienceart. If the exhibits keep pouring in at this rate, I’ll have to split up this post by region. There are five scienceart exhibits in New York alone! But for those of you who are not in the NY-region, don’t [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Learning the Art of Science Illustration

14-020FEATURE

If you’ve ever wondered what it would take to combine your love of science and art, there is a conference on the horizon that might just be the inspiration you’ve been waiting for. This summer in Boulder, CO, the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators is hosting its annual conference and it is not to be [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

I want to see Season 3 of The Fab Lab with Crazy Aunt Lindsey!

Crazy Aunt Lindsey

I began blogging – at Urban Science Adventures ! © as an outlet and tester for my bigger, bolder dream – to create and star in my own Science Television program. At the time, 2006, there were no people of color, no women, and no Black Women at all who had served as a host [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Diverisity in Science Writing addressed at 2014 ScienceWriting Conference

SciWri14-splash

The annual ScienceWriters meeting is a joint meeting of the National Association of Science Writers and the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing.  It is a meeting for science writers, by science writers, with content to appeal to both the newest writers and seasoned professionals. This year I am attending for the first time [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

#NABJ14 #HealthyNABJ Recap: Cultivating Diversity in Science Communication

Healthy NABJ Panel with (l-r) Mark Luckie, Kiratiana Freelon, me (Danielle Lee) and Robert Bertsche

I attended the 2014 National Association of Black Journalists meeting in Boston, Massachusetts July 30-August 2014 (NABJ Program book). This was the second NABJ conference I have attended, this time with assistance from the National Science Writers Association. My participation as a panel speaker and networking helped continue a conversation concerning media diversity in science [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Pinar Gurel and CauseScience

Spotlight Pinar Gurel

Welcome back to You Should Know, my weekly #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. This is installment number 12. Introducing…Pinar Gurel and CauseScience Pinar is one half of the writers behind CauseScience, a blog where scientists are passionate about…. Science! CauseScience is a new science blog, founded in April 2014 by [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Amber Bullingham and Sciency Things

Amber Bullingham Sciency Things Blog

Welcome back to You Should Know, my weekly #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. This is installment number 11 and for the first time, we hop across the pond. Introducing…Amber Bullingham and Sciencey Things Amber Bullingham is a Biologist that has always had a passion for writing. She started her blog, Sciency [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Going to #NABJ14 and I’m bringing #SciComm with me!

NABJ14 logo

I am en route to Boston, headed to the 2014 National Association of Black Journalists Meeting in July 30– August 3, 2014. The Theme is Revolution to Evolution, Shaping Our Future and I will be there representing Science! I believe that a science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) communication are revolution. Deliberately and consciously communicating [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Interested in Science Communication? Apply for Science Writers 2014 Diversity Travel Fellowship

SciWri14-splash

Interested in Science Communication? Are you a scientist or engineer interested in science communication and journalism? Are you a journalist interested in covering more science, tech, health, medicine, nutrition, environment or engineering news? Are you a student majoring in journalism, communication or science, engineering? Either way, it doesn’t matter. If you are interested in science, [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Shareef Jackson

Welcome to my second installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may have been sleeping on. Introducing…. Shareef Jackson and ShareefJackson.com Shareef Jackson shares interesting STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) news related stories at his website/blog of the same name. He discusses science [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

#Scio14 Expanding the Dialogue on Diversity: Privilege and the Pursuit of Science

BBW do science

As I was completing my doctorate studies, I was mounting an insane amount of student debt. I needed to finish. I wanted to finish. However, working an outside job or even a teaching assistantship kept taking up mind space and time and prevented me from just getting things done. I was so financially strapped that I was [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Free live stream of 2014 AAAS Science Communication Session #AAASmtg #Scicomm

DNLee at the iPad

I will be speaking  at the 2014 Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS on Thursday, February 13. I am speaking in the Communicating Science Sessions. It includes three panels. Engaging with Journalists with Cornelia Dean (moderator) and speakers Carl Zimmer, Robert Lee Hotz, David Baron, and Paula Apsell. Engaging with [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Back To School

Back to School Sale!

12 Digital Issues + 4 Years of Archive Access just $19.99

Order Now >

X

Email this Article



This function is currently unavailable

X