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Posts Tagged "Science Communication"

Anthropology in Practice

#NYCSciTweetUp is Coming!

What are you doing next Thursday? I’ll tell you what—if you live in the New York City area, you’re going to the #NYCSciTweetUp! Join the gang on March 29th, at the Peculier Pub in NYC for an informal evening of science and networking.. Updated details can always be found on the Facebook page. And as per [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Making, Education, and Innovation: Inspiring Makers in Underrepresented Communities

Maker Faire invites young Makers to enter a world of innovation and imagination. If you can dream it, you can build it—particularly as experienced Makers are on-hand and willing to share what they know. How can we better encourage a broader participation in this science and technology showcase by underrepresented groups—beginning in the very neighborhood [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

#NYCSciTweetUp Follow-Up

The third #NYCSciTweetUp was a huge success! Thanks to all who came out to The Peculier Pub. It was a pleasure seeing so many new faces mingling with familiar ones! What is the tweetup, you ask? It’s an informal monthly (or so) gathering for the science community in New York City. As Story Collider‘s Ben [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Interested in Science? Come to the #NYCSciTweetUp on Aug. 9th

Every month or so, the science community in New York City gathers to talk science over beer. The event—or TweetUp if you will—began as a means of connecting the online science community offline, which is why it bears a hashtag in its name. While the gathering is still in its infancy, turnouts have been fairly [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Are We Hoarding Connections?

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Ed Note: This article is from the Anthropology in Practice archives, and was originally posted on August 24th, 2010. I’ve elected to repost it given the introduction of the Google+, which offers (necessitates?) a new means to connect. Incidentally, if you would like connect with me on G+, you can find me at gplus.to/krystaldcosta. Facebook [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Picturing Science: Secrets of the Museum Revealed

To the public, museums are mysterious, magical places. Science, history, and context are carefully preserved and displayed—though the guy-wires are carefully hidden so as to not disturb the experience of the visitor. The work that goes into constructing the fancy dioramas and exhibits, the science that helps construct the scenes that we view as visitors [...]

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Compound Eye

Facebook’s “I F*cking Love Science” does not f*cking love artists

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Elise Andrew runs the most popular Science page on facebook. I know so, because I see her content reshared dozens of times daily in my news feed. Well, it’s not really her content, but I’ll get back to that in a minute. The point is, I F*cking Love Science is big. By posting photos, cartoons, news [...]

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Compound Eye

The Art of the Science Caption

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I am not going to tell you what this animal is. At least, not yet. Instead, I’d like to use the absence of a caption to mention the importance of accompanying science images with the right text. Why? Artists and photographers spend enough time crafting images that it’d be a waste to lose potential viewers [...]

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Cross-Check

Ebola “Fear Mongering” Critiqued by Medical Anthropologist

Newsweek cover story on Ebola is "horrible and racist," says medical anthropologist Theresa MacPhail.

A new semester has just started at Stevens Institute of Technology, and I’m more excited than usual—that is, less depressed that summer vacation is over. My division, the College of Arts & Letters, just hired two scholars to beef up our programs in Science and Technology Studies and Science Communication. One is historian of science [...]

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Guest Blog

Science Education and Changing People’s Minds: Writing to convince

I find online science communication fascinating. I am enthusiastic about its possibilities and intrigued by its challenges. With an interest in online communication, comes an interest in text. While videos, animations and images are powerful too, the written word is often the simplest and the default mode of online communication–-think blog posts, tweets, status updates, [...]

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Image of the Week

Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

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Artist: Darren Naish Source: Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on… it’s about monitor lizards, by Darren Naish on Tetrapod Zoology If you’re not a herpetologist, you may be of the mindset that lizards all look the same, but that would only expose you for what you are: a human primate, finely attuned to the faces [...]

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Not bad science

Unique Science Communication: Isabella Rossellini

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I recently wrote an article about science communication, and in it mentioned that people can communicate science in many different ways using many different types of media. One more unusual way is what Isabella Rossellini has adopted. Using real animal behaviour science, she conveys it by dressing up as the animal in question, and presenting [...]

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Not bad science

How To Get Into Science Communication Online

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I recently taught a class on science journalism and science communication. Although there have been a few articles on this topic already (in particular I’d recommend reading Ed Yong’s and Carl Zimmer’s) I thought I’d share a bit of advice from my own experience. I became involved in science writing just a few years ago, [...]

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PsySociety

Knowledge, Knowledge Everywhere: Do Social Networks Spread or Drown Health & Science News?

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We live in an age of constant data. Between television, the Internet, and  our “real-life” social circles, society has never before had as much access to health and science news as we now enjoy — and it has never been so easy for anyone to access an entire encyclopedia of information about any health or [...]

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Roots of Unity

Apply Now for an AAAS Mass Media Fellowship

The 2012 Mass Media Fellows at orientation in Washington, DC. Image: Jessica McDonald.

I started writing about math and science in June 2012 thanks to an AAAS Mass Media Fellowship sponsored by the American Mathematical Society. Every year, the fellowship provides opportunities for math and science graduate students to work for mass media outlets such as Scientific American (where I worked), NPR, the Chicago Tribune, and so on. [...]

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SA Visual

Don’t Just Visualize Data—Visceralize It

Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew (December 7, 1972). Image courtesy of NASA Johnson Space Center

The title of this post borrows from ideas presented by Sha Hwang at the Visualized conference in New York City several weeks ago: He kicked off the data-visualization event with a talk that—in effect—challenged the audience to take a step back. Way back. And then to look again, with fresh unblinking eyes. What does a [...]

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Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

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For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

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Symbiartic

Now That’s a Wee Little Infographic

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  53 million years old, and it may be the smallest mammal that has ever lived. Batodonoides vanhouteni was a shrew-like mammal that scientific illustrator Jen Christiansen has deftly described in this illustration. In addition to being an illustrator, Christiansen is also Scientific American’s art editor of information graphics. Composing an illustration with only a few, [...]

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Symbiartic

Portraits of Bonsai at the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens

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As I write this, the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens is preparing an exhibit showcasing the work of Dick Rauh, a botanical illustrator who has distinguished himself as a master of botanical illustration since he picked up a pen and paper in his retirement. In a show called “Patience, Paper, Pen and Brush,” the Gardens will be [...]

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Symbiartic

In Case You’re Tempted to Think 3D Modeling All Looks the Same

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I initially contacted Bryan Christie to request permission to feature his spectacular cheetah illustration in this year’s blitz. He agreed, and so here it is, in all its glory: But he also tipped me off to his fine art work that is equally worthy of note: How could two such disparate styles emanate from the [...]

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Symbiartic

Mossy Drops of Water

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Mineo Mizuno is a sculptor whose fascination with water as a central part of our existence took him on a journey resulting in this stunning series of large-scale moss-covered ceramic discs. His desire to capture the nature of water – its luminous, almost spritely character – lead him to perfect the form of a flattened [...]

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Symbiartic

Who Illustrates the Murals at Museums?

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Have you ever wondered who illustrates the murals at our beloved museums, zoos, aquariums, and botanical gardens? Marjorie Leggitt is one such person. Based in Boulder, CO, she has spent her career illuminating science and natural processes through her art. This mural was made for the Denver Botanical Gardens in Denver, CO to illustrate the [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond

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The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station Washington Dulles International Airport Washington, D.C. Life: Magnified is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as [...]

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Symbiartic

Essential Social Media Sites for Science Illustrators

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During my recent talk at the AMI conference about social media and illustration, I skimmed this slide near the end. Talks were intended to be 20 minutes long and I don’t like to rehearse too much: I don’t read off of my slides so I tend to remind myself of the critical points and fret [...]

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Symbiartic

ScienceArt Exhibits Heat Up This Summer

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Take a break from the heat this summer to step into some cool galleries exhibiting scienceart. If the exhibits keep pouring in at this rate, I’ll have to split up this post by region. There are five scienceart exhibits in New York alone! But for those of you who are not in the NY-region, don’t [...]

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Symbiartic

Learning the Art of Science Illustration

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If you’ve ever wondered what it would take to combine your love of science and art, there is a conference on the horizon that might just be the inspiration you’ve been waiting for. This summer in Boulder, CO, the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators is hosting its annual conference and it is not to be [...]

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The Urban Scientist

If you can’t be a good example, be a warning. How EcoInternet’s #Scicomm #Fail can make you a more culturally aware science communicator

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When I started grad school I was excited. Excited because I saw the pursuit of knowledge as the this special calling, free of the BS that my friends who worked in corporations or the government or even education had to deal with. I was apart of this fraternity of knowledge-seekers. Yea, there’s some hazing of [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Dr. Dr. Buddhini Samarasinghe and Jargon Wall

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Welcome to the thirteenth installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. Introducing…Dr. Buddhini Samarasinghe We travel back to the UK to meet Dr. Buddhini Samarasinghe. Dr. Samarasinghe earned her PhD from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom. [...]

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The Urban Scientist

I want to see Season 3 of The Fab Lab with Crazy Aunt Lindsey!

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I began blogging – at Urban Science Adventures ! © as an outlet and tester for my bigger, bolder dream – to create and star in my own Science Television program. At the time, 2006, there were no people of color, no women, and no Black Women at all who had served as a host [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Diversity in Science Writing addressed at 2014 ScienceWriting Conference

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The annual ScienceWriters meeting is a joint meeting of the National Association of Science Writers and the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing.  It is a meeting for science writers, by science writers, with content to appeal to both the newest writers and seasoned professionals. This year I am attending for the first time [...]

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The Urban Scientist

#NABJ14 #HealthyNABJ Recap: Cultivating Diversity in Science Communication

Healthy NABJ Panel with (l-r) Mark Luckie, Kiratiana Freelon, me (Danielle Lee) and Robert Bertsche

I attended the 2014 National Association of Black Journalists meeting in Boston, Massachusetts July 30-August 2014 (NABJ Program book). This was the second NABJ conference I have attended, this time with assistance from the National Science Writers Association. My participation as a panel speaker and networking helped continue a conversation concerning media diversity in science [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Pinar Gurel and CauseScience

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Welcome back to You Should Know, my weekly #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. This is installment number 12. Introducing…Pinar Gurel and CauseScience Pinar is one half of the writers behind CauseScience, a blog where scientists are passionate about…. Science! CauseScience is a new science blog, founded in April 2014 by [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Amber Bullingham and Sciency Things

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Welcome back to You Should Know, my weekly #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. This is installment number 11 and for the first time, we hop across the pond. Introducing…Amber Bullingham and Sciencey Things Amber Bullingham is a Biologist that has always had a passion for writing. She started her blog, Sciency [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Going to #NABJ14 and I’m bringing #SciComm with me!

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I am en route to Boston, headed to the 2014 National Association of Black Journalists Meeting in July 30– August 3, 2014. The Theme is Revolution to Evolution, Shaping Our Future and I will be there representing Science! I believe that a science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) communication are revolution. Deliberately and consciously communicating [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Interested in Science Communication? Apply for Science Writers 2014 Diversity Travel Fellowship

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Interested in Science Communication? Are you a scientist or engineer interested in science communication and journalism? Are you a journalist interested in covering more science, tech, health, medicine, nutrition, environment or engineering news? Are you a student majoring in journalism, communication or science, engineering? Either way, it doesn’t matter. If you are interested in science, [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Shareef Jackson

Welcome to my second installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may have been sleeping on. Introducing…. Shareef Jackson and ShareefJackson.com Shareef Jackson shares interesting STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) news related stories at his website/blog of the same name. He discusses science [...]

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