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"science"

Why Rudolph Should Have Never Joined Santa's Reindeer

Why Rudolph Should Have Never Joined Santa's Reindeer

Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer had a very shiny nose, and if you ever saw it, you would even say it glows. Late one foggy Christmas Eve, Santa came to say, "Rudolph, with your nose so bright, won't you guide my sleigh tonight?" Rudolph declined, noting that when flying around in foggy conditions, a bright red [...]

December 23, 2013 — Kyle Hill

The Need for Belonging in Math and Science

From her earliest memories, Catherine Good was good at math. By second grade she was performing at the fourth grade level, sometimes even helping the teacher grade other students’ work.

October 21, 2013 — Scott Barry Kaufman
Back off, Texas — More NC Science Crazy

Back off, Texas — More NC Science Crazy

Okay you know who’s happy today? The people of North Carolina and the people of Texas, whose legislative antiscience crazy doesn’t seem especially off the hook given the nationwide legislative crazy we have going on.

October 2, 2013 — Scott Huler
Aiming Too High (Or Too Low) When Communicating Science

Aiming Too High (Or Too Low) When Communicating Science

I recently had the opportunity to take part in a workshop for researchers about communicating science to the public. At one point the speaker suggested that the first step for anyone would be to learn how to translate scientific concepts so that a child would be able to understand them.

January 27, 2015 — Amanda Baker
An Intricate 3D-Printed Dress, No Assembly Required

An Intricate 3D-Printed Dress, No Assembly Required

One of the most inspired design studios working at the intersection of science, art, and technology today is Nervous System, a Massachusetts-based team led by Jessica Rosenkrantz and Jesse Louis-Rosenberg.

January 25, 2015 — Kalliopi Monoyios

The Science of Growing Smarter with Annie Murphy Paul

Science writer Annie Murphy Paul’s fresh perspective on intelligence and personality prompt a heart-to-heart about learning, intelligence assessments, growth mindsets and rethinking intelligence.

November 24, 2014 — Scott Barry Kaufman
Is There Anything the Mimic Octopus *Can’t* Do?

Is There Anything the Mimic Octopus *Can’t* Do?

According to science comic, xkcd, the answer is no: For the past 25 days, we have been showing off a different artist each day who is working at the intersection of science and art.

September 26, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios

This Is What We Don’t Know About The Universe

In recent days I’ve had some interesting conversations. There’s a giddiness going around, related to an outpouring of science love – the kind you get from President Obama introducing TV science shows, the kind that has wonderful visuals, but is, well, a wee bit simplistic (a sin that none of us could ever, ever be [...]

March 12, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

Our Microbial Organ – The Good and Bad Bugs of the Human Gut

Ever since coming to Harvard, I’ve been involved with a graduate student group called “Science in the News.” At SITN, the goal is to bring the fascination with scientists that graduate students have to a wider audience, and the flagship effort of the group is a series of lectures held every Autumn and Spring that [...]

November 25, 2013 — Kevin Bonham
This Image is Not Photoshopped

This Image is Not Photoshopped

It would be easy enough to photoshop a geometric pattern onto an image of a waterfall, and if that was how this image had been created I would still have nodded in appreciation of the originality and execution.

September 2, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Can Machines Produce Art that Moves Us?

This happens more often than you’d think: You tell someone you are an illustrator. They ask you a few questions and then get to what’s really on their mind: “So, do you do all your work on the computer or do you draw everything by hand?” When you respond that you do some (or all) [...]

May 19, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

Artist: Darren Naish Source: Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on... it's about monitor lizards, by Darren Naish on Tetrapod Zoology If you’re not a herpetologist, you may be of the mindset that lizards all look the same, but that would only expose you for what you are: a human primate, finely attuned to the faces [...]

May 22, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios