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Posts Tagged "media"

Anthropology in Practice

Catfishing: The Truth About Deception Online

Red-tailed Catfish (Phractocephalus hemiliopterus). | Click on image for license and information.

The growing popularity of online dating The dating scene has been changing over the last decade. According to the Pew Internet and American Life Project, approximately 6% of Internet users who are in a marriage or other committed relationship met online, compared to 3% who reported this in 2005. Additionally, 42% of Americans know someone [...]

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Cross-Check

The Genuine Articles: Why I’m Upbeat about Science Journalism’s Future

Which topic are science journalists most likely to talk about when they get together? A) The epistemological issues raised by multiverse theories; B) The revival of social Darwinist ideas in Tea Party rhetoric; C) The relevance of experiments on sea slug brains to the debate over free will; D) Statistical evidence linking global warming to [...]

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Food Matters

An Open Letter to Dr. Oz: You’re Cheering for the Wrong Team.

Screen Shot 2014-06-20 at 9.34.04 AM

Dear Dr. Oz: I caught the senate hearing earlier this week during which you answered for using “flowery language” to describe a number of weight-loss supplements that do not have (as you admit) the scientific backing for your claims. I’d like to think that you mean well. You are called “America’s Doctor.” You have huge [...]

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Guest Blog

Technogenic Disasters: A Deadly New Normal for the Media

Some go to school to become journalists. Others hit the road with a notebook, camera and insatiable curiosity, while others have a shocking moment of awareness of the complexity of the human condition and want to document it. I decided to enter the field when a war journalist showed me a roll of images from [...]

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Guest Blog

Weinergate: Private Records in a Public Age

History is littered with private indiscretions made public—some have just been more public than others: · It is believed the Leonardo da Vinci was a passionate instructor to his students; one in particular remained in da Vinci’s favor for 26 years. · Cleopatra made no secret of the nature of her political alliances, which included [...]

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Guest Blog

All about Stories: How to Tell Them, How They’re Changing, and What They Have to Do with Science

Communicating science is all about telling stories. A few days ago at the World Science Festival, a stellar panel of science journalists and writers sat down to discuss the ways in which the Web is shaping and changing how those stories are told. Moderating the "Telling Science Stories in Print and on the Web" discussion [...]

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Observations

Here’s What Happened When I Told Fox News I Wanted to Talk about Climate Change

moyer fox and friends

This morning I appeared on the nation’s number-one-rated morning show, Fox and Friends. Afterwards I tweeted out a few things that have garnered some attention, including this: Fox & Friends producer wanted to talk about future trends. I said #1 will be impacts of climate change. I was told to pick something else. — Michael [...]

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Observations

Fox News Distorts Climate Science; In Other News, the Pope Is Catholic

Pie chart showing 93 percent misleading

For anyone with an interest in journalism, it’s no surprise that Fox News Channel and the opinion pages of The Wall Street Journal lean well to the right. Editorially, these two jewels of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. have a long history of denying human-induced global warming, in keeping with certain ideological interests. New data support [...]

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Observations

Neuroscience Coverage: Media Distorts, Bloggers Rule

Media Hype and the Brain

“Superwoman has been rumbled,” declared a Daily Telegraph article in 2001 that chronicled how the human brain’s inability to “multitask” undercuts the prospects for a woman to juggle career and family with any measure of success. The brain as media icon has emerged repeatedly in recent years as new imaging techniques have proliferated—and, as a [...]

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Observations

Giant Dino exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History, or why I should not be a photojournalist

As the Blog Editor at Scientific American, I come to New York City about once a month to work in the office, attend editorial meetings, and prepare the blog network for launch some time in the near future. This week, I was in town at just the right time to join our intrepid team of [...]

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Observations

Crowd-sourced data hold potential for positive change and human rights abuses

street map with pin-drops

Social media has scored big successes in helping crowds to gather and communicate online to challenge oppressive regimes in recent weeks, but digital gathering places that are basically public—and the crowd-sourced data they generate—also carry risks. Crowds are forming so rapidly online—the photo-sharing app Instagram reported enrolling one million users in the past six weeks—that [...]

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Observations

Science bloggers gather to wrestle down myths about research and themselves

ScienceOnline2011 logo

DURHAM, North Carolina­­­­—TV pundit and Washington Post columnist George Will has a history of misrepresenting climate science—and it’s bloggers who typically make sure the record is set straight on such points. For instance, a 2009 Will editorial in the Washington Post asserting, among other things, that the extent of global sea ice today is the [...]

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Observations

The line between science and journalism is getting blurry….again

Human #1: "Hello, nice weather today, isn’t it?" Human #2: "Ummm…actually not. It’s a gray, cold, windy, rainy kind of day!" Many a joke depends on confusion about the meaning of language, as in the example above. But understanding the sources of such confusion is important in realms other than stand-up comedy, including in the [...]

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Plugged In

Tweeting to Save the Day

So Superstorm Sandy comes and pretty much knocks everybody on their butts – and then what? Where to go? Shelters? Food? Which streets are open, and which are flooded? Is somebody dropping off blankets or chain saws somewhere? When? According to Julie Macie, a graduate student at the University of North Carolina working towards a [...]

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Symbiartic

It’s time for Illustrators to take back the Net

The Copyright Sheriff is in town... (© Glendon Mellow)

“If you put an image online, expect it to be stolen.” “I got it from Google Images; it’s free.” “Why do you care if people steal your work? It’s free exposure.” Illustrators, photographers artists and painters have likely all heard these lines or ones like them before. As the information-carrying capacity of the internet has [...]

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Talking back

On “Media Refusal and Conspicuous Non-Consumption: The Performative and Political Dimensions of Facebook Abstention”

I just did something that I’m sure is not on any “helpful tips” list for aspiring science bloggers. To write this post, I just copied a title from an academic journal and hit <CTRL> V in the headline field of WordPress. I wouldn’t usually do a cut and paste, but this title brought a big [...]

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Voices

Media Watch: An Essential Tool in Diversity

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Diversity brings excellence to science, the workplace and other human endeavors, as research is showing. And the media plays a crucial role in shaping how society views its members, second perhaps only to the entertainment industry in such influence. So how we in the media business express the news could set back efforts for a [...]

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The White Noise

Artist Draws Self Portraits for Dozens of Drugs. Good or Bad?

Butalbital

An artist drew dozens of self-renderings while under the influence of varying drugs, and the series has found its way to a scrollable media platform where it’s touted as “all kinds of cool”. Check it out. Commenters congratulate the artist; point out hilarity they find in some of the work; empathize with some of the [...]

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The White Noise

Colorado Shooting and ‘Bath Salts Zombie’: Troubles of Public Health Reporting

Bat_balloon

I have a perpetual burr in my side on aspects of drug and addiction coverage. It’s hard to expect altruism in every avenue of journalism (innumerable slideshows about Katie Holmes prove the fallacy of that wish), but I want to outline problems in public health coverage I see now and again, in hopes that we [...]

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